#1
I was talking about this today with a friend. Professional musicians do have a busy life, they spend so much time on tour, then on studio writing, recording and maybe working with other bands as well, so do you think they practice like they used to, if they practice at all?

It's not like Vai does his 10-hour workout everyday or Petrucci 6 hours like when he started the band.

My point with this thread is how do you think its suppose to develop our ability even more (assuming that we're pros) with so much things going on?
#2
Sure they do they have reh on the way to gigs n stuff and they prolly practice n jam to write new material for more albums
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#3
I don't think so, especially if they have a wife and kids.
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#5
interviews in Total Guitar revieled that some profrssionals don't practice at all while touring, simply because playing the shows is practicing. While recording they might practice technique more to be able to record good quality tracks. But they generally don't practice as much.

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#7
I talked to this one bass player from Brazil on myspace and he said he practices at least 4 hours a day and went on how he has no life but music and blah blah blah. Also, John Myoung or w/e, bassist from Dream Theater warms up and 'cools down' after every show.
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#8
Music is their full time job. They'd be expected to work 40 hours/week, if not 60-70.

No, they don't spend 10 hours practicing every day, but they don't need to. An analogy: A surgeon spends many hours every week for many years training, but once they've trained that ridiculous amount, they're experts. They also do that kind of work on a daily basis.

I will note that in the booklet to my Satch CD, he says he needs "daily practice" for The Mystical Potato Head Groove Thing, so even the greats need to practice some stuff.

Yes, that is among the most bizarre song titles ever.
#9
after you've become a god it's not so much a practice thing, but a maintenance thing. gotta keep your mind and muscles strong.

like, if you'd be a virtuoso and stopped playing for a couple of years, it wouldn't take you lots of years to be amazing again, because you already 'knew' how to play, all you needed to do again was strengthening your muscles.

you don't just forget about theory also. or aural abilities.
#10
Quote by symba05
(assuming that we're pros)


That's a terrible assumption right there. Very, very few of us here are what most people would describe as 'pros.'

@bangoodcharlotte - great analogy!

I describe myself as a 'semi-pro' player. I've been playing for over 25 years, and have a degree in classical guitar. We play large festivals, concert theaters, and have gotten commercial radio and network television exposure - due largely to the release of our full-length CD.

I don't classify myself as a pro as the bulk of my income is not from doing music. Even in the years where I taught music in an actual school, I considered myself a 'pro' teacher, as I was being paid to teach. I was not being paid to play or make music, so I would not have called myself a 'pro' player.

With a wife, kids, writing, producing other bands, and my teaching job, my private teaching schedule, I really don't have time to practice. However, I can do everything I am ever called upon to do, so.... practicing doesn't really have any real current or short-term reward for me either.

CT
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#11
If you keep on practicing, one day you'll have the skill for a band.
Even more => gigs
Till one day, you''ll reach a skill level which is more then one needs in the usual riffs (solo's not included).
I'd think pro's would have achieved such skill level, en therefore only have maintenance to worry about, which is done by doing concerts and writing songs.

And even then, they'll slowly improve there efficiency. It's simply the experience of playing which will make you grow.

The 10 hours a day workout syou mention is more for the people who are tryign to become virtuoso's (sp?) within 3 or 4 years. (Notice how I said trying).
But im drifting away.

TLDR: No they don't need to practice

Disclaimer: things mentioned above are opinion based and not on true facts, for I have yet to gain personal experiences!
#12
Pro doesn't qualify as superior guitarplaying. It just means they play guitar in a professional setting (making records or music dvds, as wel as touring) Generally just living of making/playing music.

There are alot of "amateur" guitarplayers that can play better then some "professional" players.

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#13
Quote by RCalisto
like, if you'd be a virtuoso and stopped playing for a couple of years, it wouldn't take you lots of years to be amazing again, because you already 'knew' how to play, all you needed to do again was strengthening your muscles.

A couple of weeks off, yeah i'd agree. A couple of years?!

If I gave up guitar for a couple of years now it would take me ages for me to get to the standard I am now because my musles wouldn't be used to playing. Virtuosos have a lot higher skill than I do so they would have a lot more to lose in those couple of years. Also, there skill would be a lot more technical so would take longer to get back.

For example, in music a boy in my class played this really complicated Nocturne for his performance. Afterwards our teacher told us that he used to be able to play that but couldn't any more because he hadn't practiced as much as he needed to the retain that level of skill.

And the thing is, he hadn't even stopped playing piano, he played it all the time being a music teacher, he just hadn't practised that level of piece. And now that he couldn't play it, it wasn't just a matter of practising it again, he would have had to work really hard from much simpler (though still really hard, just relatively simple) and worked for a long time to get himself up to the right standard and even though he was a music teacher he just didn't have the time for that.

I think the virtuosos get away with not practising as much because they are playing such hard pieces that just playing them is a pretty good work out.
#14
I wonder what they would practise.

Unless I was improvising, I dont think I could practise for more than an hour.
#15
I'm sure playing gigs, doing soundcheck and warmup is more than enough practice for the real virtuosos. What they're playing is incredibly difficult.
#16
Quote by Avedas
I'm sure playing gigs, doing soundcheck and warmup is more than enough practice for the real virtuosos. What they're playing is incredibly difficult.


Relatively difficult.

If you practice for many years, you can play that stuff too. And just like talking, walking, driving a car, it doesn't need 6 or so hours practice after u've learned that stuff. It just needs maintenance.

The human brain naturally doesn't forget stuff (only by alzheimer or breakdown of it by age or other sickness)

It's like an attic. Everything is in a place, and u put stuff in boxses and on shelves. After a few years u will forget what u've put in the attic. If you after those years go tru ur stuff in the attic, you will remember again what u've put there and u will remember that for days or weeks after or even months/years. Then you will forget it again, depending on ur health (of ur brains).

Tl;tr:

Links u make in ur brain will stay there all ur life. But if u learn more and more stuff through life, the links will be lost in the "mess" in ur head. Untill you (maintenance) go through them again. And they will be back in "front"of all ur other memories/brainlinks.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Nov 9, 2008,
#17
I agree with12345. I can't play the stuff I played when I got my degree almost 15 years ago. The good news for me is that I don't have to maintain *that* skill level. It would take me probably a good year or so of practicing daily to get the wheels back on those pieces.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#18
Quote by axemanchris
I agree with12345. I can't play the stuff I played when I got my degree almost 15 years ago. The good news for me is that I don't have to maintain *that* skill level. It would take me probably a good year or so of practicing daily to get the wheels back on those pieces.

CT


Yes, but it's still relative. IF u practice the hard stuff until u can play it "in ur sleep". IT will stay there far longer.

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#19
Yes, it will, but very difficult material will be harder to dig up after a shorter amount of time. I'm talking about classical guitar pieces that pro classical guitarists who tour would play at their concerts. No matter how good you have it one day, it will fade without regular brushing up. That stuff, for me was almost 15 years ago. I would pretty much have to re-learn whole sections of it, and there's no guarantee at all that my level of technique will still be there to support that relearning without a good few months or so of practice.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#20
Quote by axemanchris
Yes, it will, but very difficult material will be harder to dig up after a shorter amount of time. I'm talking about classical guitar pieces that pro classical guitarists who tour would play at their concerts. No matter how good you have it one day, it will fade without regular brushing up. That stuff, for me was almost 15 years ago. I would pretty much have to re-learn whole sections of it, and there's no guarantee at all that my level of technique will still be there to support that relearning without a good few months or so of practice.

CT

+1

The level virtuosos are playing at are just so high that without practice you will lose it very quickly.

Say you can only play open chords on guitar, you might only need five minutes a day to retain that skill level. Say you are a virtuoso who plays incredibly technical pieces, you would probably need hours a day to retain that level. And the better you get the longer you need.

Now if both of these players stopped playing, the first would only be five minutes under what he needed every day, whereas the second one would be hours under. Also, the second one has a lot more skill to lose than the first one. This means the second one gets a lot worse compared to what they were than the first one.

Then to regain that you will have to start at whatever place you have slipped down to.

However, just by playing what they have to every day (performing, studio ect.) I think virtuoso musicians will be enough to retain their skill level, or for them to lose very little which can be recovered whenever they have a long time to practise.
#21
As I basically agree with bgc, here's an interesting point -

Shawn Lane basically quit guitar for 6 years, and then came back to his previous level within a year. He played piano throughout this time.

My boss played no bass guitar (his main instrument) for more than a year, but during this time was playing hand precussion.

In both cases, they said that they actually improved on their main instrument because of the other things they'd be doing. Anyone find anything similar?
#22
^Maybe with regards to understanding the instrument better.

I quit electric guitar for 3 months to get ready for a classical guitar audition, and when I came back to electric, I noticed a huge degradation in my technique. I only got it back in a month. I noticed my regular exercises (scale runs, etc) were extremely sloppy. I was literally freaking out. I was missing every other note on my sweeping. So... I don't think abandoning the instrument for a long period of time is a good thing. But that's just me.

But I passed my audition so it's all good.
#23
Quote by Freepower

In both cases, they said that they actually improved on their main instrument because of the other things they'd be doing. Anyone find anything similar?


In the fifteen years since I finished my B. Mus in classical guitar, I have taken ten years' worth of voice lessons, almost that much time learning to record stuff, spent some time doing some piano, brushing up a couple of times on my knowledge of concert band instruments (trumpet, trombone, flute, sax, etc.).

I feel that I have improved as an all-around musician. My ability to sing enables me to participate in a lot more things than ever before, and my ability to communicate with other musicians has improved tons. It has also strengthened my ear by leaps and bounds. My recording experience has made me more attuned to timing, tuning, and tone issues, and has sharpened my ability to communicate with other musicians with greater diplomacy.

I have also continued to play in cover bands and original bands. My songwriting and arranging abilities have improved I think.

My classical guitar playing though..... miles below where I was. I still vaguely recall parts of the pieces I used to play.... some pieces I can remember a full four or eight bars at a time, though sloppily. Other pieces that I'm positive I played look only vaguely familiar. My classical guitar playing has taken a huge hit.

You can't do everything though.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#24
I think once you reach a certain point, you stop practicing just for the sake of practicing.
You start to write and improvise all the time, which is still practicing and it keeps your chops up. It's just a different focus.

I don't sit down and run exercises to get fast or anything anymore. I usually am trying to come up with some lick or part and build on it, then maybe I'll loop it and improvise some lead parts over it.

If I am trying to hit a lead part that is somewhat difficult for me, then in that case maybe I would work on just that.

For the most part, I think you get to a point where you realize that just playing and writing will make you better just like practicing exercises or scales will. I actually think making music will improve your skills faster.
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#25
Quote by bangoodcharlote
I will note that in the booklet to my Satch CD, he says he needs "daily practice" for The Mystical Potato Head Groove Thing, so even the greats need to practice some stuff.

I saw Clapton discussing a Robert Johnson song. It was filmed recently (last five years or so by the looks of E.C.) He explained how he had to practice the song every morning for the last week so that he could play a difficult passage in the song for the film they were recording.

So on the one hand you've got Robert Johnson a guy who's guitar playing history spanned no more than 11 years.

And on the other hand you have a guy who's been regarded as one of the worlds best guitar players for more than forty years.

Yet the forty year veteran has to practice daily in order to tackle a technique played by a guy who should be a novice by comparison. Crazy shit.
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#26
I bet Petrucci still practices loads before touring and especially before recording an album

and I bet Broderick will always be a practice monkey.




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#27
Speaking of...do you all know anywhere where i can find what to do with Steve Vai's 10 hour workout?

I really wanna try it out and need something to keep me focused on practice and have been wanting to try it out. I have the Guitar Pro tabs but i'm sure there's other stuff to be played.
#28
Quote by Kant
Speaking of...do you all know anywhere where i can find what to do with Steve Vai's 10 hour workout?

I really wanna try it out and need something to keep me focused on practice and have been wanting to try it out. I have the Guitar Pro tabs but i'm sure there's other stuff to be played.
Theres a tab of it somewhere on UG. But I'm sure you want vai's commentary with it? Maybe you could search Steve Vai's personal website or it might be findable if you search some torrent website or google it with the phrase "rapidshare" (so your search would look like "10 hour workout" rapidshare vai or something).

The human brain naturally doesn't forget stuff (only by alzheimer or breakdown of it by age or other sickness)
Interesting. But surely there will be some difficulty in recall with older information?