#1
I have been playing bass (self taught) for the past 2 years or so, an aim of mine is to get into a band and start doing some gigs.

I have been putting it off as im not sure if I would be able to hold my own in a band, i think it's because I have no experience of playing with outher musicians, as well as the fact that my music theory isn't quite as good as I'd like it to be!

Does anyone have theory/confidence tips for newbie musicians wanting to join a band?
#2
ask friends if they play, and if they do then ask if they want a bit of a jamming session??

then get them to ask their other friends and build it up from there.
#3
no experiance with other musicians?

go jam with some of your friends, everyone and their grandmother plays an instrument these days
#4
well first of all, you gotta be confident. if you dont put yourself out there and really think youre good, no one else will. if you have friends start by just jamming with them, theyll be less likely to criticize you harshly. as for music theory, lessons might be a way to go. i played for 2 years before i started lessons, and even if youre pretty good, it can be pretty humbling. there are some things that you just arent going to get about music without someone else showing them to you.
#5
cheers! none of my friends play anything... but i think lessons are a good idea!
#6
yeah definitely check out some local teachers in your area if you can afford it. your best bet is to probably look for a more private teacher. although they're a bit harder to find, they usually charge less and care more than like people from a big music store.
#7
The only way you'll get better is by playing with other musicians. This is the perfect oppertunity. This will help you interact on a musical level, improve your timing and rhythm, and allow you to really create musical fusion. I highly recommend you take this oppertunity to really express yourself. Otherwise you will find it incrediably hard to find a band later
#8
well do you think anyone else had band experience before they joined their first band? how would you get experience in a band otherwise?
Who decided that pie would be sold on Tuesday but not Wednesday?
#9
You sound exactly like me a few months ago. Playing for 2.5 years, self taught, limited theory, with next to no one the jam with.
Anyway I joined a band about 2 months ago and it was the best thing I could have done for my playing. Things were a bit rough to start with but after I got used to playing with other people everything was fine.
I say go for it.
#10
Yeah, this sounds familiar to me too. I've played guitar for 5 years and bass for 2, limited theory as well, but I did have some exp jamming with other musicians (not a ton, though). Still, I did my first audition as a bassist a few months ago for my band and am really, really glad I did. Just put your best foot forward and give it your best shot. If it turns out that that isn't enough, practice and learn more and try again later on. Good luck!
#11
knowing music theory is a little over rated. I know a little bit, but in all reality the most important thing is knowing what sounds good.
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#12
True, but theory can help you write stuff that sounds good.
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#13
this has been quite helpful in itself - I have been chatting to a few guys around uni and they seem pretty happy to jam sometime

here goes...
#15
^ +1

i still do this actually. playing with different people randomly playing different styles can open you up creatively too.
#16
My 2 cents: Play some covers. And don't make it really weird off the wall stuff that little to nobody else knows or likes. That way you'll have a much greater chance of finding others who can find themselves on the same page.

Learn entire songs ALL the way thru, and not just the favorite riff or the really cool chorus. Learn all changes and nuances. It will take you a long way. And be able to play it in your sleep. IMO, it's better to play just a few songs exceptionally well instead of playing a whole bunch all shaky and half-ass.

Understand some typical chord progressions ( for example a 1/4/5 blues progression, or Greenday style punk), and what musical key the song is in. by doing this, you'll be able to anticipate changes based on the groove of the music instead of pure memorization.

Does your city have any bars with open mic? It's like karaoke for instruments, and I've seen some cool improv jams that were inspiring. Plus, you'll get a feel for where you are compared to your fellow aspiring musician peers.
#17
Quote by JLT73
knowing music theory is a little over rated. I know a little bit, but in all reality the most important thing is knowing what sounds good.


You don't know what music theory is, do you?
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#18
Quote by Archeo Avis
You don't know what music theory is, do you?


You may know what sounds 'good' without much theory but to make intresting, and probably overall, better music you need to learn music theory!!!!!!!
#19
Quote by Archeo Avis
You don't know what music theory is, do you?


yes I do. I actually have taken a class, but what is most important is what sounds great. Knowing theory is great and all, but it is not essential.. Do you think every pro musician knows music theory inside and out? my guess is absolutely not.
My Gear
Guitars:
-Gibson Les Paul Studio
-Ibanez "lawsuit" Les Paul
-Ibanez S470
-PRS SE Custom

Amp:
Marshall TSL100
Marshall 1960a cab

Effects:
Dunlop 535q wah
Visual Sound Liquid Chorus

Pickups:
Guitarforce
MHD
#20
Quote by JLT73
yes I do. I actually have taken a class, but what is most important is what sounds great. Knowing theory is great and all, but it is not essential.. Do you think every pro musician knows music theory inside and out? my guess is absolutely not.


You said...

knowing music theory is a little over rated. I know a little bit, but in all reality the most important thing is knowing what sounds good.


...which is ridiculous, as it assumes that theory in any way seeks to affect whether or not you play what "sounds good". This strongly suggests that you don't understand what music theory is, let along any of its subject matter.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#21
Quote by Archeo Avis
You said...
...which is ridiculous, as it assumes that theory in any way seeks to affect whether or not you play what "sounds good". This strongly suggests that you don't understand what music theory is, let along any of its subject matter.


Didn't get enough attention from mommy and daddy today?

You're really reaching here as well as trying real hard to make a point that really has no relevance.

I will say it again...

knowing music theory is not essential to know what sounds good. Anyone can pickup an instrument and play something that sounds great but not understand why the notes sound good together or whether or not the progression they are playing is rudimentary correct or even if they are soloing and playing notes that are inbetween note in a scale, but it still fits.

My point as I stated before in an open ended question was: "Do you think every pro musician knows music theory inside and out? my guess is absolutely not." Sure Yngwie, stach, vai, gilbert those guys understand theory. But what about the classic rockers, metal guys, etc etc.
My Gear
Guitars:
-Gibson Les Paul Studio
-Ibanez "lawsuit" Les Paul
-Ibanez S470
-PRS SE Custom

Amp:
Marshall TSL100
Marshall 1960a cab

Effects:
Dunlop 535q wah
Visual Sound Liquid Chorus

Pickups:
Guitarforce
MHD
#22
Quote by JLT73
Didn't get enough attention from mommy and daddy today?

You're really reaching here as well as trying real hard to make a point that really has no relevance.

I will say it again...

knowing music theory is not essential to know what sounds good. Anyone can pickup an instrument and play something that sounds great but not understand why the notes sound good together or whether or not the progression they are playing is rudimentary correct or even if they are soloing and playing notes that are inbetween note in a scale, but it still fits.

My point as I stated before in an open ended question was: "Do you think every pro musician knows music theory inside and out? my guess is absolutely not." Sure Yngwie, stach, vai, gilbert those guys understand theory. But what about the classic rockers, metal guys, etc etc.


I 100% agree. Knowing basic theory can be helpful but in the end it's all about writting what sounds good. Theory in my oppinion is a guide to help you know what sounds good.
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