#1
Hey Pit, I was just wondering who could answer a quick AP Calculus problem.

It has to do with Derivatives of Exponential functions; I know that the derivative of (e^x)=(e^x) , but I don't know what to do with the coefficients and such, when dealing with more complex problems.

Basically, I'd like to know how to go about doing a problem like:

Find an algebraic expression for f'(x) given f(x)=(e^5)-4e^x

Any help is appreciated.
(by the way, it's hard to see the f prime symbol with this font, but the problem is finding the derivative of the function).

Sorry, mistyped the first time.
Last edited by manmanman133 at Nov 9, 2008,
#6
Quote by magic medicine
there is no x in that expression so the derrivative is zero

Sorry, a typo, it's corrected now.
#7
math thread
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#14
No no no no and no to the user above me...
This is how you do it...

f(x)=e^u
f '(x)=u'e^u

So for your problem...

f(x)=(e^5)-4e^x

(e^5) -> u=5 and u' =0
So 0(e^5)=0

-4e^x -> u=x and u' =1
So 1(-4e^x)=-4(e^x)

Therefore the answer is 0-4(e^x)
Last edited by MetropolisPt3 at Nov 9, 2008,
#15
I used to think that tabs was the closest thing to math the Pit could do
lol