#1
A friend was going to sell me his old guitar. Samick Les paul clone. Its a really great guitar and i love it. I love everything about it except for its color. I really want to strip the paint and apply another color, without covering the transparent wood marks .

Ive never done any of these things,nor would I like to wreck the guitar.... The only experience i have with building guitar is reviving a Squier Tele,replacing input jack and taking it apart and setting it back.

In short, I want to turn this


Into this


What's the risk of wrecking the action,and overall playability of the guitar?
#2
why would u ruin that lovely color?

oh, and having the pricetag on a guitar isnt the same as still having "the new car smell" on a car :P
Quote by ealtdharkon
Sorry to break this to you, but you "hardcore" fans don't HAVE mosh pits.
You have epileptic line dancing.


Quote by NotTheSun3290
Well... I AM a virgin, afterall...
#3
keep it like it is, u like the sunshine burst better
Just call me Julius, J, etc.
Taking an Internet break for a while, will come on when I can.
#4
Well painting like that is really hard. You have to have the right paints, and it takes alot of man time to do because you have to sand and re-sand it over and over. If you don't know what your doing youll just make it look horrible.

p.s. you probally wont mess up the action or playability unless you slather it in paint and the paint warps the wood somehow.
i enjoy head
#5
if u love it,keep it as it is, plus u barely see the color of the guitar when u play remeber kids:

1 sound
2 comfort
3 looks
Just call me Julius, J, etc.
Taking an Internet break for a while, will come on when I can.
#6
I have a samick strat clone and the sound it has is pretty bad
if the les paul model is anything like it, who cares if it is ruined
#7
I'm not familiar with that guitar, but I am guessing it's a cheaper model.

That being the case, it won't have (likely) a thick flamed maple top (the wood you can see).

So it will either be a Veneer (unlikely) or a transfer, ie. fake.

So. The colour may be on the transfer, with just some clear coat over the top.

Which means you can't do what you are suggesting.

The best way to check, is to remove a pickup and see if you can see the thickness of the "maple" part, to check if it is wood, veneer or "other".
#8
But I wouldn't really mess up the action and playability by taking things apart right ? (only one person made comment to that,thank you)

And if all else fails, would it be easier to make it white? By the way how would I make that black border line along the guitar body?( Or i could skip that part)

Ill give it a check after I receive the guitar. The guitar is GREAT!Sounds great and plays great, Its normally worth around 450-500 i think,and would be on sale secondhand for probably 200$. But since he doesn't care about it and I happened to ask him he just offered 60$.....

PS: Guitar shown in picture with price tag is found in google,not mine
#9
I can't believe everyone posting in this thread.

He doesn't like the f*cking colour and he wants to change it. What don't you guys get?

Howangcturtle, SkeetUK is right though, it is not likely to have a top that you can do another see through finish on.

It would be very easy to paint it white, all you would need to do would be to rough up clear coat with sandpaper and then spray the white, followed by all the appropriate sanding and multiple coating, followed by clear coat.

The black border is called binding. While the instrument is being made, the route a shelf into the top of the guitar, and take a plastic, wood, or shell strip (in this case plastic), and they glue it on. Maybe This tutorial

http://www.stewmac.com/freeinfo/Binding/Installing_binding/a-bindings.html

will help explain things. It is difficult to do, and another option is to just mask off an area and paint it black for the look of binding without the hassle.

Just forget what all these people say about the colour. If you want it different, it is your guitar, do what you like.

EDIT: And no, you can't really **** anything up with a paint job. You won't be altering the construction in any way, and as long as you can solder the electronics back together, you'll be fine.
Enjoi <--- Friend me
Quote by Scowmoo
Otter, you're my new god.
#10
Great!! thanks so much!!! Well opinions are great, but i'd like opinions AND constructive answers to my question. lol. but its all good,you guys have been much help.Especially Otter of course.

Just got it today, im not really knowledgable of guitars since all ive owned is a 1st hand acoustic, 2nd hand FREE squiere tele affinity series, and now this one ^^.

I think its quite buzzy in my opinion.and im booking an appointment with one of thoese repairing guys to look it up. But I haven't found a way to remove the neck away from the body....From what i see its a glued on.... So still trying to figure it out.

The guitar actually looks great though I might act on the painting thing later on depends.....
#11
Removing set (glued in necks) will destroy the neck, and requires you to route the neck out. You basically just remove wood to create a new pocket, and discard the old ruined neck.

It is not recommended, and your neck can probably be fixed the way it is.
Enjoi <--- Friend me
Quote by Scowmoo
Otter, you're my new god.
#12
Hmm if that's the case if i do paint it in the future ill just tape over the whole neck and it should be okay im guessing....


I was going to get the fret buzz and tune up the action at my music store...but charging 50$ minimum doesn't seem to cut it for me....for now anyways. Is there anyway i could fix it by myself? or find somebody that knows this stuff?
#13
So anyone have suggestions how I could fix this up? I thought about using wood filler. But im scared it won't be firm enough, and the strap pin would come off along with the whole wood filler mold in the middle of playing.....Just a thought


#14
Quote by howangcturtle
So anyone have suggestions how I could fix this up? I thought about using wood filler. But im scared it won't be firm enough, and the strap pin would come off along with the whole wood filler mold in the middle of playing.....Just a thought




If the screw does not hold the strap pin in.

Drill out the centre screw hole, to accept a suitable wooden dowel.

Glue the dowel in with Titebond and hammer it home (not too hard!)

Then re-drill a pilot hole for your screw and screw the strap button back on.

The lacquer you may be able to fix with some sanding and perhaps "drop filling".

Drop filling is using a brush etc to drip lacquer into cracks etc and allowing it to run in to them.

When dry you can gently buff it out.
#15
The screw hole I can put a screw in, put by the time i reach the end, The whole Strap pin sinks into that hole. (I assume my friend dropped the guitar really hard on the floor,causing strap pin to sink into the wood,breaking the lacquer too...)

So is it okay if I just get the lacquer and fill it? Can I use anything else?
#16
I would just fill and re-drill a hole a little further up or down and use that for the strap pin. Although the dowel suggestion is a little harder its probably a better solution to mine.
#17
Truth is I can't really picture how the dowel method is done..... Mind explaining again. Sorry to bump this post up again....
#18
Drill a hole, put the dowel in, file/sand it flush with the guitar.

Now there is no more hole at all. Drill a new one, put the strap pin in.
Enjoi <--- Friend me
Quote by Scowmoo
Otter, you're my new god.
#19
Quote by Øttər
Drill a hole, put the dowel in, file/sand it flush with the guitar.

Now there is no more hole at all. Drill a new one, put the strap pin in.


You don't need to fill it flush to the body.

I am assuming that the strap button sits in the wider hole slightly?

It's the central hole that you need to sort out.

Just find a hardware store or just get some round wooden dowel rod say 1/4 inch thick, which is about the thickness of ready made dowels.

Drill out that central hole with a 1/4 inch drill or slightly larger (5/16th), to a the depth of the dowel or about 1.5 inches. Pop some wood glue in the hole and around the dowel and tap it in the hole.

When it's dry, drill a small pilot hole, then screw your strap button back in.
#20
Sorry maybe I should be more clear,how could the dowel just fit into the hole? The dowels Ive seen in my life are definately too skinny to fill the hole. But i'll check around. Thanks =)

Wood glue? Would that hold in the dowel firm enough?
#21
Quote by howangcturtle
Sorry maybe I should be more clear,how could the dowel just fit into the hole? The dowels Ive seen in my life are definately too skinny to fill the hole. But i'll check around. Thanks =)

Wood glue? Would that hold in the dowel firm enough?




Do that.

Then pilot (small hole) into the dowel, then screw the the strap button in.

Wood glue bond, is stronger than the wood itself.
#22
Sounds good! thanks =)
I actually noticed the paint job does not come from the outside, rather the huge layer of lacquer or something else covered the painted wood... i don't know.Just want to get more information on that, since it might help me with the repainting in the future.