#1
I've been looking through the lessons, and I can't find where I read what a note in parentheses means. It's a ghost note, right?
#3
Quote by anarkee
Correct, that is the way ghost notes are indicated on tabulature.

Okay, so just play it softer?
#4
I was going to write an explanation of my own, but the wiki article does it better than I can:

On the double bass and electric bass, as with the guitar, ghost notes can be performed by muting the strings, either with the fretting hand or the plucking/picking hand, which creates notes of indeterminate pitch that have a percussive quality. On the electric bass, ghost notes are widely used in the slap bass style, as a way of creating a percussive, drum-like sound in funk and Latin music. On the double bass, percussive ghost notes are sometimes performed by slapping the strings against the fingerboard, which creates a percussive, "clacky" sound. With the double bass, slap-style ghost notes are used in rockabilly, bluegrass, and traditional blues and swing jazz.
#5
Okay, last question is mute it from the beginning, giving it a quiet sound, or mute it immediatly after, making it more like a drum beat; a quick boom, then little to no sound.
#6
Its a mute completely. It's more of a percussive sound with little tone. There's a couple of you tube videos out there with good demonstrations of the technique.
#7
Quote by anarkee
Its a mute completely. It's more of a percussive sound with little tone. There's a couple of you tube videos out there with good demonstrations of the technique.

Okay, cool. Thanks for the help.
#8
Actually, I'm going to go against you here Tam. (DEAR LORD).

He actually asked for a note in brackets, like (2) rather than an x, which is how a ghost note is written.

If I get a note written between two brackets, I play it a lot softer than any other note in the given dynamic direction. For example, if I'm playing a forte piece, I would play that note piano, if not pianissimo.

Or Tam could be right. Who knows!
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#9
Its funny Chris--I always thought that ghost notes were tonal percussive notes as well and then I had someone correct me and say they weren't, but rather that they were merely percussive accents. I've also always been a bit confused on the difference between dead and ghost notes.

Ok...someone want to clear this one up?
#10
From Wiki:

The term ghost note, then, can have various meanings. The term anti-accent is more specific. Moreover, there exists a set of anti-accent marks to show gradation more specifically. Percussion music in particular makes use of anti-accent marks, as follows:

slightly softer than surrounding notes: u (breve)
significantly softer than surrounding notes: ( ) (note head in parentheses)
much softer than surrounding notes: [ ] (note head in brackets)

In jazz notation for wind instruments or string instruments, the intent of a composer for a note to be ghosted is often indicated by using an 'x' for a notehead rather than an oval.
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#11
Tab-wise anyway, I always take parantheses notes to be much softer, like a passing note, and an x to be a dead note (percussive).
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