#1
I was just now thinking about this. Lets say you were to practice one exercise or solo VERY slowly and accurately for 10-15 mins every single day for 1 month. Would you get good at it? Would speed incrase drastically? I'm thinking of just practicing a lot of different solos and exercises for 10-15 mins instead of just focusing on one single thing all the time.
#2
You would definitely get good at it... practice the most challenging ones too.
#3
You would see major improvement if you practiced a solo or exercise slowly for 10-15 minutes every day for a month. If you did this 2-3 times a day it would be even greater improvement.
#4
Yes you will get faster and cleaner. I think it's good to practice a variety of things, limiting yourself to one solo for a long time can wear you out. Sit with a metronome for a while and slowly bring it up to speed, playing slowly and accurately sounds better than fast and sloppy, and it's how you learn to play fast and accurate. Dedication like that is a virtue, and it can be very boring and tiring, but in the end your reward is epic shredding skills.
#5
That should be the right approach but after enough practice at a certain speed, you should bring it up a bit to the point where it's slightly challenging but easy enough to play clean and smooth. Just make sure you increase the speed when you feel confortable with your current speed.
Also, 10-15 minutes might not be enough time each day for a particular song or solo, I think somewhere between 25 to 45 minutes depending on what you're practicing and that should really be sufficient; the key is not to practice too little or too much and not too slow or to fast.
#6
Quote by o_hai_dere
I was just now thinking about this. Lets say you were to practice one exercise or solo VERY slowly and accurately for 10-15 mins every single day for 1 month. Would you get good at it? Would speed incrase drastically? I'm thinking of just practicing a lot of different solos and exercises for 10-15 mins instead of just focusing on one single thing all the time.


Don't time it.

Just practice it until you can play it...... then play it.
shred is gaudy music
#7
Quote by emP
You would definitely get good at it... practice the most challenging ones too.


Ya that's what I plan to do
#9
Within a month of doing that, you will probably double your speed while keeping it clean (depending on how difficult the lick/solo is).
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#10
Quote by o_hai_dere
I was just now thinking about this. Lets say you were to practice one exercise or solo VERY slowly and accurately for 10-15 mins every single day for 1 month. Would you get good at it? Would speed incrase drastically? I'm thinking of just practicing a lot of different solos and exercises for 10-15 mins instead of just focusing on one single thing all the time.


Slow playing for a certain length of time is no guarantee of anything. Sorry. All depends
what you're doing in that time. You'll probably get some apparent muscle memory
benefits. But if your technique is inherently limited, what you'll get out will be limited.
#11
Quote by edg
Slow playing for a certain length of time is no guarantee of anything. Sorry. All depends
what you're doing in that time. You'll probably get some apparent muscle memory
benefits. But if your technique is inherently limited, what you'll get out will be limited.


What exactly are you saying? So then what do you recommend?
#12
Quote by o_hai_dere
What exactly are you saying? So then what do you recommend?


I'm saying setting a timer for 15 minutes and playing slowly for X days, doesn't guarantee
you anything. In other words, you don't automatically "level up" by gaining TPs (time
points). The missing components to the level up formula is attention and awareness.
The level of those directly determine how efficiently the time is used and the level
where you'll "max out".
#13
Quote by edg
I'm saying setting a timer for 15 minutes and playing slowly for X days, doesn't guarantee
you anything. In other words, you don't automatically "level up" by gaining TPs (time
points). The missing components to the level up formula is attention and awareness.
The level of those directly determine how efficiently the time is used and the level
where you'll "max out".


+1


TS:

that's why I say, " practice until you can play it, then.......... play it"
( you can of course spread the work over multiple practice sessions)


I would assert that if you really like playing music on your guitar ( for the music sake, not just for the sake of being " good"), then you won't need to time yourself. you'll just practice the piece of music you're working on ( because you happen to love that piece of music), until you can play it well, regardless of how long it takes. Then you can just enjoy playing it as part of your repertoire, and move on to new things.

Timing your practice sessions, in the way you suggest, is something that I could see doing for an activity that you really don't care for too much like homework or chores. you time them so that when your 15 minutes is up you can say "whew, I'm done with that crap, now I can go do something I like !!!!"


When you're doing something you love ( like playing the guitar), you play as long as you can because that's what you want to.


Anyway, to sum all that up, the time you put in isn't a realistic indicator of what you've achieved. How well you can actually play the piece of music is.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Nov 11, 2008,