#1
Well, when I play, I mute unwanted noise from the strings with the bottom of my hand/top of my wrist. Whichever you want to call it...

Anyways, I've noticed that my picking blows on the low E and A strings. Not so much the D, but it's not as good as the G, B, or high E strings.

I also noticed this: When I mute the strings in this way, I hold my arm so that it lightly touches them. Then, when I get to the lower strings, it goes a little more limp. Like it's lazy...Like I'm lazy.

To fix this, I've started to hold my arm more sturdy when I get to these strings so that it doesn't go limp-er. Could this cripple my playing at all?

DON'T EVEN TELL ME I SHOULD START TO ANCHOR! I've had far too many people tell me this..."OMG what's so bad about anchoring? It helps with acuraccy!" BULLSH*T!
#3
Quote by telecastermetal
anchoring does help, but its not for everyone. it depends who you are. jsut do what ever feels good.


No. Read the sticky.

TS, I think that you are probably using the lower strings as a mild anchor without even knowing about it. You don't have anything as a reference point when playing the lower strings, so you're not in control (you're not in control anyway, but that's not the point). Play completely floating for a while, forgetting about muting, and just work on accuracy. This will also help your left hand mutes
#4
While it's true that many people do not use anchors, it has proved beneficial to many as well. Don't diss a technique simply because you don't use it. Everything is a tradeoff; there is no perfect technique. However, there are techniques that provide significant advantages over other techniques. Personally, I anchor with my pinky finger on the pickguard or by muting the strings, the latter of which IS a form of anchor. You might want to experiment with both and see if your picking improves. Just a thought.
Not the destination, but the journey...
#6
Quote by The.new.guy
Well, when I play, I mute unwanted noise from the strings with the bottom of my hand/top of my wrist. Whichever you want to call it...

Anyways, I've noticed that my picking blows on the low E and A strings. Not so much the D, but it's not as good as the G, B, or high E strings.

I also noticed this: When I mute the strings in this way, I hold my arm so that it lightly touches them. Then, when I get to the lower strings, it goes a little more limp. Like it's lazy...Like I'm lazy.

To fix this, I've started to hold my arm more sturdy when I get to these strings so that it doesn't go limp-er. Could this cripple my playing at all?

DON'T EVEN TELL ME I SHOULD START TO ANCHOR! I've had far too many people tell me this..."OMG what's so bad about anchoring? It helps with acuraccy!" BULLSH*T!


Put your hand in the picking position for those strings and drift your hand between the low and high e string, picking each as you reach it, attempting to maintain as little tension as possible in your arm and trying to iron out any differences in your pick hand position.
You may notice this reduces your ability to play the high e though, because you are relearning your positioning.
Originally posted by TapMaster
If you break a JEM you know your going to go to hell when you die

Only member of the 'This is too immature for me' club.
#7
Quote by The.new.guy
When I mute the strings in this way, I hold my arm so that it lightly touches them. Then, when I get to the lower strings, it goes a little more limp. Like it's lazy...Like I'm lazy.

To fix this, I've started to hold my arm more sturdy when I get to these strings so that it doesn't go limp-er. Could this cripple my playing at all?


In general, "limp" is a good thing. What I would try before "sturdying up" is focusing on the quality of individual pickstrokes on the E and A strings. As much as anything, this may be a simple lack of practice - how often do you play fast licks on the E and A strings?
#8
I didn't even know what anchoring was till the other day! Then i knew i didn't do it Or at least, i wasn't a serial anchorer. Then i decided to see what it was like...So i planted my hand on the bridge, and picked away. Accurate, and helpful. But obviously not as good as how i played normally, where i had much more freedom or movement, which i like when i play.
#9
Quote by Freepower
how often do you play fast licks on the E and A strings?

Not very often. However, there are licks that I've heard in my head that are moderately fast that use the E - D strings. Around 140 BPM using 16th notes.

EDIT: One quick question, 2nd on my priority list at the moment - I seem to tense up a bit more when I stand and play. Then, I sit down and all that tension goes away...very quickly. I own a Kramer Striker and it's a beast. No, not a beast as in it's really fast. It's as heavy as a Les Paul, yet only a little bigger than a Strat. Could this be promoting (I did not say 'causing') tension?
Last edited by The.new.guy at Nov 10, 2008,
#10
Quote by The.new.guy
Not very often.


Therein lies the problem then, you just need to practice using those strings more.
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#11
Quote by The.new.guy
Not very often. However, there are licks that I've heard in my head that are moderately fast that use the E - D strings. Around 140 BPM using 16th notes.

EDIT: One quick question, 2nd on my priority list at the moment - I seem to tense up a bit more when I stand and play. Then, I sit down and all that tension goes away...very quickly. I own a Kramer Striker and it's a beast. No, not a beast as in it's really fast. It's as heavy as a Les Paul, yet only a little bigger than a Strat. Could this be promoting (I did not say 'causing') tension?


To your 2nd priority; I do the same thing. I think 90% of all people do. I guess it's cuz of the learning to play sitting down kind of thing. I play better sitting down. (I play a LPstandard)

Just try to get your strap comfortable, preferably high up? Then relax. I usually move around when i play. Put on a jam track (usually a song) and just get relaxed and comfortable whilst standing.
#12
^ yep. It's the same thing with me. And as a result I have my strap so short that my guitar is way too high up to look good, but as long as it's comfortable, I don't care how it looks.

In response to the TS, you just have to play on the low E and A strings a bit more and get used to the difference in how they feel under your hand and against the pick compared to the B and high e. Take a look at some old Metallica stuff. I'd recommend anything from Kill 'em All or Master of Puppets. A lot of their riffs on those albums use a lot of strong, steady picking with palm muting on the lower strings.

P.S. It's a good thing that you have decided not to start anchoring. It can become a horrible habit that can be hard to break and anyone who tells you that it's a good thing doesn't know what they are talking about.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#13
Quote by Junior#1
P.S. It's a good thing that you have decided not to start anchoring. It can become a horrible habit that can be hard to break and anyone who tells you that it's a good thing doesn't know what they are talking about.

+10000000000000000000000000000 mate!

It pains me to say this, but in almost every single picking thread I've done on here, someone has told me to start anchoring. I used to anchor, and I was fine with it until I heard about people injuring themselves because of it. It took me months to quit and it's still comes back every now and then. Terrible, TERRIBLE habit that I had.
#14
Quote by The.new.guy

It pains me to say this, but in almost every single picking thread I've done on here, someone has told me to start anchoring. I used to anchor, and I was fine with it until I heard about people injuring themselves because of it. It took me months to quit and it's still comes back every now and then. Terrible, TERRIBLE habit that I had.


Yeah I'm one of those people who once did it and then injured myself. My wrist started to hurt and I went to the doctor and he told me I had developed tendinitis. It was shortly after that when I found UG and discovered what I was doing wrong.

And to the people who support anchoring, either listen to people like me, Z4twenny, Freepower, Bangoodcharlote, etc. or else continue in your ways and don't come complaining to us about how you damaged your wrist and can never play guitar again without pain.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
Last edited by Junior#1 at Nov 10, 2008,
#15
Quote by The.new.guy

EDIT: One quick question, 2nd on my priority list at the moment - I seem to tense up a bit more when I stand and play. Then, I sit down and all that tension goes away...very quickly. I own a Kramer Striker and it's a beast. No, not a beast as in it's really fast. It's as heavy as a Les Paul, yet only a little bigger than a Strat. Could this be promoting (I did not say 'causing') tension?


It might be due to the fact that they way your sitting is not similar to the way your standing playing up. I find that many people hunch their backs a little when they practice sitting down, but when they stand up and play their back back is straight. So if you do hunch your back while sitting, I suggest practicing with a straight back when you're sitting because you are not going to be hunching your back while playing standing up (I think hunching your back while standing up can cause tension in your back, for me at least). I don't know if you cant understand what I'm saying, I'm pretty bad at explaining things.

Quote by iwanttone93
While it's true that many people do not use anchors, it has proved beneficial to many as well. Don't diss a technique simply because you don't use it. Everything is a tradeoff; there is no perfect technique. However, there are techniques that provide significant advantages over other techniques. Personally, I anchor with my pinky finger on the pickguard or by muting the strings, the latter of which IS a form of anchor. You might want to experiment with both and see if your picking improves. Just a thought.


Anchoring is NOT a technique, it's just a lazy way of doing something. It's kind of like steroids to a bodybuilder, it can help you in the beginning but their are health risks and effects with prolonged use.

TS, you are smart to reject the idea of anchoring.
#16
Quote by Unledded
Anchoring is NOT a technique, it's just a lazy way of doing something. It's kind of like steroids to a bodybuilder, it can help you in the beginning but their are health risks and effects with prolonged use.

TS, you are smart to reject the idea of anchoring.

GO UNLEDDED! LAY DOWN THE LAW! Haha

Thanks for the advice too, by the way! You did a great job of explaining it, too.

EDIT: After carefully observing my posture when I stand and when I sit with the guitar, I slouch more when I stand. Kinda weird, huh?
Last edited by The.new.guy at Nov 11, 2008,
#17
How can you NOT anchor when palm muting? Hand on guitar= anchor. A palm mute is by definition an anchor.
Not the destination, but the journey...
#19
Ahh.... It makes sense. So it appears my problem was more of a problem of definitions than of technique...cool. This was really helpful.
Not the destination, but the journey...
#20
Quote by iwanttone93
Ahh.... It makes sense. So it appears my problem was more of a problem of definitions than of technique...cool. This was really helpful.

There's a reason it's called "Read this F***ing sticky! Almost everything is covered here."