#1
I have a problem. I need advice and I'd really appreciate it. My band played a show a few hours ago and right before we finished sound check my strap broke, my guitar fell, and my headstock absorbed the whole impact. My headstock broke clean off right above the nut.

It's an Epiphone G-400. It has an angeled headstock, but the break is almost perpendicular. There is a crack in the headstock itself.

I was wondering, does it look like I can fix it, and what would be the best way.

Thank you.


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#2
I dont see why it couldnt be fixed....

you will need to drill some holes.. and support it with wooden pegs.......

but the more important question....where is your truss rod?
Total Failure

If every dream is a wish, then to dream of zombies is to wish for an appetite without responsibility
#3
-sheds a tear-
I hope it gets fixed, man.
G-400's are great guitars...
Quote by J.Bass.M

I don't care about the f***ing radius of the f***ing inlay.
#4
thats exactly what I though. where is the truss rod?

And yeah, you can drill holes in the headstock and line them up Perfectly with 2 holes (which your going to need to drill) on the neck, Fill the holes in either the neck or the headstock with glue and then hammer the dowel in, then put glue in the other bit and hammer the 2 together, then clamp it up somehow while the glue dries.

Your headstock will always be weak now and it would be a very good idea to buy a new neck, but your neck it a set neck isn't it?

Also, your saying it broke just after (or before can't remember) sound check. So you didn't get to play the gig?
#7
Man, that it is the saddest thing I ever heard.

I sincerely hope you manage to resurrect her

If you need a good laugh to cheer you up tho, follow the link on Slovak_Ghost's sig and read all the threads/links etc - class.
EPILPSTDYamahaRBX100BassTanglewoodTW28/STRFenderchamp600CubaseStudio5Saffirepro40AlesisM1ActiveMKIIMAudioKeystation88RodeNT1AShureSM57KeeleyModTS9MackieMCUwww.myspace.com/cuthbertgriswald
#8
The truss rod is at the top of the neck.

I thought clamping would be a problem. To little tension would cause a weak joint, and too much tension could move the headstock because the crack is the center of the angle. That won't be a problem with wood pegs in place.

The neck is set, yes. I won't be able to replace that.

We did play the gig, I also have an LTD KH-203. It has old strings and an unbalanced bridge so tuning was a problem. My back up now is now going to be an acrylic guitar I bough for $100 when I had been playing for only a year. It has the most uncomfortable neck I've ever played, but it's better than having to end a set early, or to not even play.

What glue works good for gluing a headstock. I've heard that any wood glue works but I don't believe that.
#9
Quote by NakedJeff
The truss rod is at the top of the neck.

I thought clamping would be a problem. To little tension would cause a weak joint, and too much tension could move the headstock because the crack is the center of the angle. That won't be a problem with wood pegs in place.

The neck is set, yes. I won't be able to replace that.

We did play the gig, I also have an LTD KH-203. It has old strings and an unbalanced bridge so tuning was a problem. My back up now is now going to be an acrylic guitar I bough for $100 when I had been playing for only a year. It has the most uncomfortable neck I've ever played, but it's better than having to end a set early, or to not even play.

What glue works good for gluing a headstock. I've heard that any wood glue works but I don't believe that.

Use regular wood glue like tightbond as long as it's under pressure for 24 hours after you use it the new joint will be stronger than wood.
#10
Quote by 420 FREAK
Use regular wood glue like tightbond as long as it's under pressure for 24 hours after you use it the new joint will be stronger than wood.


Ding Ding! Tightbond would probably work best, a lot of the "super" glues out there with the fancy label and lots of advertising really aren't that great. You could even use the yellow carpenters glue, but the tightbond is a bit stronger. Just put glue on both broken pieces, I like to let it sit for a minute to let the glue get a little tacky first, then put the pieces back together firmly, and wipe up any glue that squeezes out at this stage because it is alot easier to do now. You will have to figure out a way to clamp it tight though. Just a tip on that though, if you are putting any of your clamps close to the break, and don't want to glue your clamp to the neck, you can put a piece of wax paper under your clamp to protect it, and then when everything is done, the wax paper just peels away.
#11
titebond ftw - nothing more, nothing less. only other thing id suggest is gorilla glue. super glue is good for certain things like filling little cracks in inlay routs, repairing pearl and building up small spots of fretboard chipping
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#12
Alright, thanks for the help, I really appreciate it. I'm going to start working on it tomorrow.
#13
Dear Naked Jeff

Yes It CAN be fixed...I've resurrected many LP wit angled necks. Get marine epoxy:

http://www.epoxy5050.com/cgi-supplies/shop.pl?type=topic&topic_name_value=epoxy_glue&cart_id=ffecac8eb187dcb1a8eaf3c22f6d615c

Set up a clamping system consisting of a strap ratchet clamp
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_hi?url=node%3D468240%2C328182011%2C551238%2C553150%2C553168&field-keywords=irwin&x=10&y=12

This has to be strapped vertically from the top of the headstock to the body near the strap button (should probably remove the button temporarily)

Also prepare a clamp like the quick hand clamps
http://www.amazon.com/IRWIN-SET150-6-Piece-Clamp-Set/dp/B00008WFT9/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=electronics&qid=1226785885&sr=8-1

One of these will go along the line of the crack
T Mix the epoxy correctly. and brush into every crevice of the wood. Then align the pieces perfectly. Then slowly tighten the strap clamp with the ratchet until the pieces are SLIGHTlY tight together and excess epoxy is pressed out. Get some wax paper to lay across the crack to prevent the epoxy from sticking to the strap material and the clamps. Then use a hand clamp to clamp across the crack over the wax paper. Try to tighten the strap clamp a little more before you finally tighten the hand clamp (It helps to ave someone elp you do this) Then let dry over night. The bond is generally strong enough on its own. But if you want to make sure, after this, rout out some vertical splints to splice across the crack and glue them with the same epoxy. Then sand finish and repaint. This should last forever.