#1
I understand how modes are formed, and I know the shapes, formulas, etc. but when I get down to playing a solo (without backing) say in, D Dorian, it never sounds right to finish on a D note. It only sounds like it is finished when I land back on the C, which is the tonic center (I think) of D Dorian. Whenever I finish on a D, it always sounds unfinished, and this happens with all the modes I play with except Ionian. Is there a way to stop this?

Thanks,

SMAiTY
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#2
do you use vamps?
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#3
Could be 2 things. You are either natural drawn to the major scale. Or u don't " hear" the sound of the modes yet.

Best is to play over a vamp.

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#4
At the minute, all you're doing is playing C major - if you are resolving to C, then you're playing "C Ionian". That's the first issue.

Can you play comfortably between C major and Am? That's a good place to start.
#5
Quote by Freepower
At the minute, all you're doing is playing C major - if you are resolving to C, then you're playing "C Ionian". That's the first issue.

Can you play comfortably between C major and Am? That's a good place to start.



The problem here is, is that ionian is naturally the strongest voice of the modes, especially without a vamp as a context. And if ur ear isn't trained enough to hear the other modes, you naturally go with the 1 that is the strongest too hear (major in his case).

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#6
So basically I just have to train my ear to listen to the different modes... Thanks!
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#7
Keep in mind, some modes are harder to resolve than others, and don't resolve the same way a major or minor key would. This is just due to the way they're structured. For example, I think Mixolydian is the easiest to resolve, while Phrygian and Locrian are harder.

It takes practice though. You should forget about the fact that they're built of the parent scale, and just treat them as an individual key (even though it's not).

I was in the same situation, but now my Dorian sounds like Dorian, and resolves on the proper note. Just keep practicing.
#8
It doesn't sound right because you're not using Dorian. The mode is determined by the tonal center, the order of the notes and your position on the fretboard are irrelevant. All you're doing is playing the major scale.

Again, I find myself recommending that you ignore modes and focus on learning the theory behind the major scale. Your question will answer itself after you do.
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#9
Quote by smaity
I understand how modes are formed, and I know the shapes, formulas, etc. but when I get down to playing a solo (without backing) say in, D Dorian, it never sounds right to finish on a D note. It only sounds like it is finished when I land back on the C, which is the tonic center (I think) of D Dorian. Whenever I finish on a D, it always sounds unfinished, and this happens with all the modes I play with except Ionian. Is there a way to stop this?

Yip there is a way to stop this.

STOP thinking of relative modes. You have it in your head that to play D Dorian you play the C major scale and finish on a D note. This is not playing modally. What you need is the power of parallel thinking.

The notes in C major and D Dorian are very very different. Though it is true they both use the same seven pitch classes, but the fact is they don't actually have a single note in common!! (If you think of scale notes in terms of scale degrees which is a far better method of comparison than comparing pitch classes.)

You don't need backing to make modes work but it does help you get into the feel and allow you to hear how each note functions differently because your root is right there to hear each note against. Be sure to practice D Dorian over a static Dm vamp.

But any idiot can make the C major scale sound Dorian by playing it over a Dm vamp right.

Going down the same lines as Freepower - can you play in a minor scale (without backing) and make it sound like it's resolving to the right place? For example when you play a Dm solo (again without backing) does it sound like resolves to D??

If you can do that you can play modally. All you need to do is sever the mental link that's holding you back. Namely that D Dorian is the C major scale with D as the root.

Forget about parent scales and relative modes for a while and start forming a new more productive link. Try thinking of D Dorian as D natural minor with a natural 6. After all, if you think about it, these scales actually have far more in common than D Dorian and C Major do. Dorian shares six notes with D minor.

D minor = D E F G A Bb C D
D Dorian = D E F G A B C D

If you can make D minor resolve to D then you can make D Dorian resolve to D.

Good Luck.
Si
#10
Assuming you're using modes correctly, the best way to resolve is usually by moving degreewise (as in by small diatonic steps) towards the tonic and finish on the tonic.

Sometimes you might want to add a leading tone (a major seventh) in minor modes, as this will help in resolution. Some people will argue that this isn't being modal though.