#1
So I've been wondering for a while, what makes a certain scale mesh with chord progression? Obviously, a minor scale is going to fit over something in, say, d minor. But I'm asking about things like what makes a harmonic minor scale not fit over dominant 7. Isn't that the chords have to be based off the notes of the scale or something like that?

Also, a harmonic or melodic scale would fit over power chords, correct?
-Andrew H
band: syncopated groove punch
#2
Assuming you mean the Dominant 7 chord of the tonic, the chord is the 1 3 5 b7 of a Major scale and you're talking about Minor scales here.

Any scale fits over any chord that is composed of notes all found in said scale.

Power chords are neither major nor minor, so they go both ways.
#3
Oh, I see.
Thanks. I get it now. I just needed some clarification.
-Andrew H
band: syncopated groove punch
#4
Quote by fagelamusgtr
Oh, I see.
Thanks. I get it now. I just needed some clarification.

So you know which kind of 7th chord works with harmonic minor?
Si
#5
Quote by 20Tigers
So you know which kind of 7th chord works with harmonic minor?


I think it could work with m7 chords. I'm not sure which others yet. But I do know it would sound fine over minor chords. Just learning this stuff now.
Could you tell me?
-Andrew H
band: syncopated groove punch
#6
Quote by 20Tigers
So you know which kind of 7th chord works with harmonic minor?


Harmonic minor describes a convention within minor harmony in which the dominant chord is made to be major. Asking which chords work under harmonic minor is pointless, since harmonic minor itself describes the chords being used. If you for some reason want to treat harmonic minor as a scale and build chords with it (and I don't see why you would), just start stacking thirds and see what it gets you.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#7
Quote by Archeo Avis
Harmonic minor describes a convention within minor harmony in which the dominant chord is made to be major. Asking which chords work under harmonic minor is pointless, since harmonic minor itself describes the chords being used. If you for some reason want to treat harmonic minor as a scale and build chords with it (and I don't see why you would), just start stacking thirds and see what it gets you.


I was just using harmonic minor as an example. I'm finally getting around to teaching myself some theory, and i wasnt sure what works and what doesnt work under certain chord progressions.
-Andrew H
band: syncopated groove punch
#9
Quote by bangoodcharlote
To teach yourself theory, read the lesson in my sig, the lessons in Freepower's sig, and the Crusade articles.



Yeah, I read the crusade acticles. They helped A LOT.
And thanks, I'll give ur sig a try.
-Andrew H
band: syncopated groove punch
#10
Quote by Archeo Avis
Harmonic minor describes a convention within minor harmony in which the dominant chord is made to be major. Asking which chords work under harmonic minor is pointless, since harmonic minor itself describes the chords being used. If you for some reason want to treat harmonic minor as a scale and build chords with it (and I don't see why you would), just start stacking thirds and see what it gets you.
Wow, +1 actually not sarcasm, 'tis an awesome post

If you really wanted to use harmonic minor in a jazz "playing the changes" sort of way with a "seventh" chord of some kind, I'd say the best option is a mM7 (1 b3 5 7). It's a weird chord that I personally hate the sound of. Thankfully, I've never had to play one.

Quote by bangoodcharlote
To teach yourself theory, read the lesson in my sig, the lessons in Freepower's sig, and the Crusade articles.
Obligatory crusade suggestion is still relevant. Probably the best free theory articles known to man.
#11
Quote by fagelamusgtr
I think it could work with m7 chords. I'm not sure which others yet. But I do know it would sound fine over minor chords. Just learning this stuff now.
Could you tell me?

Well you would check out the 1 3 5 7 of the chord. In the case of the harmonic minor you would get 1 b3 5 7 - a minor triad with a major seven. This is a min/maj7.

A m7 is 1 b3 5 b7 which is outlined in the natural minor scale.

A maj7 is 1 3 5 7 which is outlined in the major scale.

A dom7 is 1 3 5 b7 which is outlined in "dominant" scales such as mixolydian etc.

Of course this is all in relation to chords built on the root of the scale.

As you mentioned the Harmonic Minor scale was used as an example and exercise only.

Since you had mentioned that scale already I just stuck with it and tried to stick with what it appeared to me you were trying to learn rather than try to show how smart I am by being "actual factual" about the "proper" use of the harmonic minor scale.
Si
#12
I'm really getting into learning some theory and i want to know where i can find the Crusade article!

I was also going to post something like this but found this thread instead, does this type of theory help you learn what kinds of scales/modes go over certain chords? I've been wanting to get to something like that in the level i'm playing at and am very curious on how to get that started.
#13
Quote by Kant
I'm really getting into learning some theory and i want to know where i can find the Crusade article!

I was also going to post something like this but found this thread instead, does this type of theory help you learn what kinds of scales/modes go over certain chords? I've been wanting to get to something like that in the level i'm playing at and am very curious on how to get that started.
Search crusade in the coloumn section of this website.