#1
I searched and found some helpful topics, but didn't really answer all of my questions. I have been playing guitar for almost 10 years and have recently started playing lead in a new band I am writing for. I'm curious as to how much or how little is good for playing lead, though I assume it depends on the music and what sounds pleasing to the ear. We are playing a kind of alternative rock with screamo/metal parts as well.

I don't want to drown out the singer by playing some lick over the rhythm, so should I save the technical parts for intro's, or parts between verses, and then stick to simple stuff inbetween (very subtle, almost hard to hear)? I'm not really sure where to go, I'm starting by just playing a different octave of either the rhythm, or trying to match the vocal notes on the fretboard.

Also, should a lead guitarist always be playing something different than rhythm? It seems like you should, or else what is the point of having two guitars, but I really don't know. Thanks in advance.
#2
Well If u play quintuplet tapping licks when the singer is singing, it won't work.

Unless your steve vai: Check chorus of linked video.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O1jWq_pF37s&feature=related

You sayu have 2 guitars, try harmonies in the verse, or higher chords, double stops etc.

You generally don't play the same as the 2nd guitarist cause it would be overkill and drown everything out. However it depends what sound u want, there's really no rule for this.

Just experiment with stuff.

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??
Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Nov 11, 2008,
#3
Thanks for the reply. What are double stops? And by higher chords, you mean like playing the same chord but an octave up?
#4
Quote by Slick_KH
Thanks for the reply. What are double stops? And by higher chords, you mean like playing the same chord but an octave up?


well higher chords, yes an octave higher maybe. And double stops are 2 notes.

Example

First guitar 2nd guitar (you playing this on top)
e|----------------------|-----------------------------|
B|----------------------|-----------------------------|
G|----------------------|---9-9-----12-12-14-14|
D|-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-|--9-9-----12-12-14-14|
A|-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-|----------------------------|
E|-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-|----------------------------|

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??
#5
Two guitars requires cooperation. Frequently, the first guitar part should be written with the second part in mind. Or at least leave enough space for the second guitar to have a place to occupy. If the space isn't there, just double the part, play nothing, or add accents and fills in the spaces that the singer is giving you.

An example of accents would be the horn sections of a lot of funk songs.

Listen to Santana for some great examples of using fills between the vocals to keep the song moving.
#6
This may be my problem, in that I write the whole songs chord progression, then write the lyrics/melodies, THEN I write the leads after, so maybe I'm not giving myself adequate space for the leads. Perhaps I could break down the strum patterns a bit. Thanks for the tips guys.

Another question I have not necessarily related to my first topic, but to prevent from multiple threads. My singer just started playing guitar and he's very limited at it. He writes all his songs in open chords, with pretty basic progressions (three chords, typically). They are pretty catchy and sound good, but my problem now is turning them into something heavier. Do you guys run into this problem? I know I could turn them into power chords, but then it's just a simple three power chord song that's quite boring. Alot of heavy bands do an acoustic version of a song or two using open chords, but how would one go BACKWARDS from an open chord song...
Last edited by Slick_KH at Nov 11, 2008,
#7
You need to work with him while writing, it will give you a lot more room to work with instead of trying to "fix" or complicate a song after he's finished it.
Fender MIJ Blue Flower and Pink Paisley Startocasters,Fender White MIM 50's Strat with Noiseless Pickups,Fender Graffiti Yellow Tom Delonge with EMG-81, Gibson Les Paul Studio lite 91', Agile 3100 Purple Bird, Agile 2000 HSB slim, Agile 2500 white
#8
Quote by Slick_KH
This may be my problem, in that I write the whole songs chord progression, then write the lyrics/melodies, THEN I write the leads after, so maybe I'm not giving myself adequate space for the leads. Perhaps I could break down the strum patterns a bit. Thanks for the tips guys.

Another question I have not necessarily related to my first topic, but to prevent from multiple threads. My singer just started playing guitar and he's very limited at it. He writes all his songs in open chords, with pretty basic progressions (three chords, typically). They are pretty catchy and sound good, but my problem now is turning them into something heavier. Do you guys run into this problem? I know I could turn them into power chords, but then it's just a simple three power chord song that's quite boring. Alot of heavy bands do an acoustic version of a song or two using open chords, but how would one go BACKWARDS from an open chord song...


Nail the basic harmony, and experiment with it with adding little flavours, different rhythms etc.

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??
#9
Quote by Slick_KH
This may be my problem, in that I write the whole songs chord progression, then write the lyrics/melodies, THEN I write the leads after, so maybe I'm not giving myself adequate space for the leads. Perhaps I could break down the strum patterns a bit. Thanks for the tips guys.

Another question I have not necessarily related to my first topic, but to prevent from multiple threads. My singer just started playing guitar and he's very limited at it. He writes all his songs in open chords, with pretty basic progressions (three chords, typically). They are pretty catchy and sound good, but my problem now is turning them into something heavier. Do you guys run into this problem? I know I could turn them into power chords, but then it's just a simple three power chord song that's quite boring. Alot of heavy bands do an acoustic version of a song or two using open chords, but how would one go BACKWARDS from an open chord song...

Add a couple variations to the chords, like extensions, or only playing parts of the chord.
Or, like you said, you COULD make the open chords into power chords, and then just arpeggiate/sweep pick over them.
I'm that dude with the fro.
Quote by angus fan16
Long story short, a whale flew out of the ocean, landed next to me and shot like a wall of water straight into my face.
#11
Quote by Slick_KH
I searched and found some helpful topics, but didn't really answer all of my questions. I have been playing guitar for almost 10 years and have recently started playing lead in a new band I am writing for. I'm curious as to how much or how little is good for playing lead, though I assume it depends on the music and what sounds pleasing to the ear. We are playing a kind of alternative rock with screamo/metal parts as well.

I don't want to drown out the singer by playing some lick over the rhythm, so should I save the technical parts for intro's, or parts between verses, and then stick to simple stuff inbetween (very subtle, almost hard to hear)? I'm not really sure where to go, I'm starting by just playing a different octave of either the rhythm, or trying to match the vocal notes on the fretboard.

Also, should a lead guitarist always be playing something different than rhythm? It seems like you should, or else what is the point of having two guitars, but I really don't know. Thanks in advance.

You sound like your on the right thought process. But there is no rule of what to do so feel free to expirament and use your own taste and judgement to feel it out. Dont be afraid to ask the other band members what they think. I agree you dont want to drown out the singer. In many songs lead guitar plays nothing or like you said very subtle accents. You can have solos and instrumental bridges to get your chance to take the spotlight. Try to picture the whole picture. The best music is made when all bandmembers set aside their egos and work together to achieve something great. And you can double up with the rythem or expirament with harmonising and various other things. The best advice is communicate with your bandmates and keep an open mind and dont be afraid to try things. Go with your gut/ear. This is advice is all vague but its hard to answer this question in simple terms as its no pretaining to a specific passage of music. Good luck definatly sounds like you have some good ideas.

Also learning theory and putting a lot of thought into intervals and practicing over backing trakcs in your own free time will get that part of your brain working. Ive made vast improvments on my lead abilitys. Not so much tehcnically latley but most ly on knowing what notes to play at what time. Im focusing a lot on hearing intervals and how they sound over the different chords in the progression. I spend a good chunk of my practice time making up leads over progressions while putting thought into what notes are in the chords and what intervals make the sounds i want. Im still no warren haynes but im getting better which is all I care about.