#1
Ok, so i've been playing guitar for fair amount of time, and I feel like i am completely lost in regards to soloing. All i really know how to do is do stupid first couple of Minor Pentatonic patterns.

I really want to learn how to play melodically, but i have no idea how to. I've been trying to watch this video to help me:

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=5777562536751428345

but it is really too complicated for me. I really would like to one day play like Marty Friedman (he is such a beast) but i have no idea what i need to practice or how to get there. So what i really need is for someone with knowledge to tell me what to practice/how to get there from square one.
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#2
Basically you want to put more emphasis on the notes that are in time with the drum beat.
#3
Use your ears and brain more - start actually listening to the sounds your making and thinking about what sound you want next.
Actually called Mark!

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#4
Basically

If you want to play melodically take the minor pent of which you already know

and throw in some random notes that you wouldn't normally play in the minor pent and find ones you like. You'll actually find you are playing notes that are in the Natural Minor, Harmonic Minor or maybe even modes like Phygarian etc...

Fun times

Just remember your phrasing (Root Note sustained every 4 bars)



piece of piss
#5
I remember learning that you want to try and emphasize the root note of the chord being played at that time.

I was also looking at Marty's Melodic Control Video, and he stated how he took a chord and sort of "made up" his own scale with notes that he thought sounded good with it. Is that something i could possibly do?

Quote by steven seagull
Use your ears and brain more - start actually listening to the sounds your making and thinking about what sound you want next.


That's definitely something i'm not really doing. I am just taking a scale and pretty much (well not entirely) playing notes :-P. I remember hearing on the vid i was watching that you don't need to always be playing notes, and that taking some time to sustain a note not only sounds good but allows you to think where you are going next.
↓↑ MISDIRECT ↑↓


The (Rather Basic) Rig:
- 1982 Marshall JCM 800 2204 (Feels good, man)
- 1960 Marshall AV Cab (Vintage 30s, Feels good, man)
- A shitty MIM strat
- Fulltone OCD (Jizztastic)
- Dunlop Classic Crybaby
#6
Quote by Hirschberger

That's definitely something i'm not really doing. I am just taking a scale and pretty much (well not entirely) playing notes :-P. I remember hearing on the vid i was watching that you don't need to always be playing notes, and that taking some time to sustain a note not only sounds good but allows you to think where you are going next.

Don't worry...it's what EVERYBODY does at first, usually until somebody points it out to them

Just teach yourself to think musically - when you listen to a piece of music, no matter what it is, really listen to it. Try and pick out the rhythm and bassline and see how the melody line interacts with it. Likewise just listen to the backing chords or bass and see if they suggest a different melody line to you, or even a harmony line.

Pretty much all music will contain a bassline, some sort of backing to give you a tonal centre and a melody line over the top of it - the melody line will often be vocals or it could be a solo instrument. Whether it's a nursery rhyme, rock song, blues, pop, electronica...even a stupid advertising jingle they're all essentially the same. Learning to spot those components will help you understand how they all fit together and gives you a better understanding of music.

Just start thinking about sounds, forget your fingers for a while...forget the guitar even. Just listen to songs, or even the aforementioned advertising jingles and just hum a simple melody along with them. It doesn't have to be the same melody that's in the song even, just make noises and see if they fit - your ears should be able to tell you what sounds nice and what doesn't.

It's even better if you can record your humming - then you can simply play it back to yourself and figure out where it all appears on the guitar and see what scale you've ended up using...9 times out of 10 you'll have come up with something that either fits in the major or natural minor scale. Doing stuff like that trains your ears and helps you bridge the gaps between your ears, brain and fingers - it also gives you little seeds of ideas to play around with and develop.
Actually called Mark!

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...it's a seagull

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#7
The most important part of soloing is the elusive "phrasing." When we speak, we typically tend not to run on forever, and just like this, you shouldn't play a series of notes that stretches on forever, and call it a solo. To create a truly "melodic" solo, you must divide it into phrases which "silences" between.

Instead of playing steadily for four bars, play for a full bar, half the second, and wait to dive back in on bar 3, or something. Be expressive!

Another thing, melodies are more impressive when they are phrased within themselves successfully, meaning - points of interest are shown by great leaps in the music, or offbeat stops, or slowdowns or speedups.

But like everyone is saying, think musically, be expressive, and most of all, don't limit yourself to a scale, if anything, bend notes in the scale to ones that are either out of the scale, or to another note.

Happy soloing.