#1
Here they are,

what notes would be in the eb harmonic minor scale?
What notes would be in the f# melodic minor scale?
What notes would be in the c natural minor scale?
What notes would be in g harmonic minor scale?
what notes would be in b harmonic minor scale?
and what notes would be in a# melodic minor?


Thank you so much for taking the time to read this thread, any help is greatly appreciated!

~andrew
#2
Learn how to figure it out yourself dude. We can help you


All you do is take the root of the scale you want, build the major scale off of it, and then make the necessary changes in intervals to get the new scale. Let's try it with Eb Harmonic Minor:

Eb major: Eb, F, G, Ab, Bb, C, D

Now change it to harmonic minor. Harmonic minor's intervals are: 1, 2, b3, 4, 5, b6, 7

So, flatten the 3rd and 6th to get Eb Harmonic Minor. Now we get:

Eb, F, Gb, Ab, Bb, Cb, D


Do that with the rest and you're golden

Try it yourself and I'll help ya out
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#3
So F# melodic minor,


major scale:
F# G# A# B C# D# E# F#

So with the melodic minor you sharp the 6 and 7th steps, so D# becomes Dx? and E# becomes Ex?
#4
Mmm... So that's how it is! I believed that you're supposed to flatten the 7th after you've constructed the natural minor scale, but that's not true, as you raise the 7th on a natural minor to make it harmonic...

Yeah, silly me. I took notes on all the chord formulas and was thinking idiotic. Thanks TS!

Edit for above: you'd raise the 6 and 7th degrees of the Natural minor to make it melodic. to change the major scale to melodic minor you'd just flatten the 3rd.
If you play guitar, please don't waste your time in The Pit, and please instead educate yourself in the Musician Talk forum, where you can be missing out on valuable info.
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#6
Quote by andrew6986
Wait so was I right?

No. You said that to change the F# major scale to melodic minor you just raise the 6th and 7th. That's not true. You do that when you're changing from a natural minor:

F# Major: F# G# A# B C# D# E# F#
F# minor: F# G# A B C# D E F#
Minor scale: 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7

F# minor: F# G# A B C# D E# F#
F# melo minor: F# G# A B C# [D#] [E#] F#
[]-indicates raised notes.

To change it from Major to melo minor:

F# Major: F# G# A# B C# D# E# F#
F# melo minor: F# G# A B C# D# E# F#
Melo minor: 1 2 b3 4 5 6 7 8

Holy crap, I hope I got this. Most likely. I'm an idiot.
If you play guitar, please don't waste your time in The Pit, and please instead educate yourself in the Musician Talk forum, where you can be missing out on valuable info.
Quote by DiminishedFifth
It's like you read my mind!

I got meself a self-approving sig. Kick. Ass.
#7
http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/guitar_scales.php

Type in the scale, type in where u want too play it on the neck, type in if u want 3 notes per string or not and get the scale degree formula to the left.

And you get it in Tab form, note form, and " guitar neck" form.

And if u select shifted u get it in a view that takes u from lower frets to higher frets, to connect it all.

Site also has all chord, all arpeggios, and some chord progressions.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Nov 11, 2008,
#8
I think the whole "Make adjustments to the major scale" method is kind of confusing, no offence Metal4all.

There are 3 minor scales, and one major scale, so just remember the 4 formulas, they're all simillar anyways.

Major: Root, Major second, Major third, Perfect Fourth, Perfect Fifth, Major sixth, Major seventh.
Or: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 (All the intervals are major, and the 4 and 5 are perfect.

Natural Minor: 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 (The "flattened" intervals are minor instead of major)

Harmonic Minor: 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 7 (Same as the natural minor, but with a major 7th degree for awesome resolutions.)

Melodic Minor: (Ascending) 1 2 b3 4 5 6 7 (Descending) 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 (Same as natural minor)

Hope that helps. Just memorize those 4 formulas and you're good. I've pretty much restated what Metal4all said, but I just think it's easier to write em out right away rather than make changes to the major scale. Less chance for errors, imo.
#9
There are 3 minor scales


This is misleading. Harmonic and melodic minor describe conventions within minor harmony/melody (respectively); they are generally not treated as scales in their own right.

I think the whole "Make adjustments to the major scale" method is kind of confusing


I don't see how. Scales are described according to their relationship with the major scale anyway. You don't see anyone describing harmonic minor as 1-2-3-4-5-6-#7.
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#10
Quote by andrew6986
Here they are,

what notes would be in the eb harmonic minor scale?
What notes would be in the f# melodic minor scale?
What notes would be in the c natural minor scale?
What notes would be in g harmonic minor scale?
what notes would be in b harmonic minor scale?
and what notes would be in a# melodic minor?


Thank you so much for taking the time to read this thread, any help is greatly appreciated!

~andrew
Seems as though you got some homework on the natural minor, harmonic minor and melodic minor scales huh.

Write out the scale formulas.
Natural Minor = 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7
Harmonic Minor = 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 7 = (natural minor scale with maj7)
Melodic Minor = 1 2 b3 4 5 6 7 = (natural minor scale with maj6 and maj7)

Now you can start with the major scale and make the alterations as necessary since all scale formulas relate back to the major scale.

So the natural minor scale is the major scale with a flatted 3 6 and 7,
Harmonic Minor is the major scale with flat3 and 6.
Melodic Minor is the major scale with a flat 3.

Or you can start with each minor scale and make alterations as necessary.
To get Harmonic Minor start with the natural minor and raise the 7th a semitone to a major 7.
For the melodic minor start with the natural minor and raise the 7th and 6th a semitone to a major7 and major6.

So the example you used already F#.

You could start with the
Major scale 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 (F# G# A# B C# D# E#)
Lower the third to get Melodic Minor 1 2 b3 4 5 6 7 (F# G# A B C# D# E#)

Or you could start with
Natural Minor 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 (F# G# A B C# D E)

Raise the 7th degree of the Natural Minor Scale by a semitone to a major 7 and you have the
Harmonic Minor 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 7 (F# G# A B C# D E#)

Raise the 7th and the 6th of the Natural Minor by a semitone each to a major 7th and major 6 and you have the
Melodic Minor 1 2 b3 4 5 6 7 = (F# G# A B C# D# E#)

Good Luck with the rest of your homework. Post it up and we'll check it for you if you want.
Si
#11
Quote by Archeo Avis
This is misleading. Harmonic and melodic minor describe conventions within minor harmony/melody (respectively); they are generally not treated as scales in their own right.

Yeah, but I think the TS just needed to write them out. You're right though, and I guess it's something I forgot to mention.


Quote by Archeo Avis
I don't see how. Scales are described according to their relationship with the major scale anyway. You don't see anyone describing harmonic minor as 1-2-3-4-5-6-#7.

Yes, but there are only 4 formulas, and I don't think they're that hard to remember. And if you remember the changed intervals, why go through the process of adjusting the major scale, why not just write out the intervals right away. It's a good learning process though (making the changes to the major scale).

And I think it's far easier to remember something like Phrygian as "minor scale with a flat 2" rather than "Major scale with a flat 2, 3, 6, 7".

But anyways, it's just an opinion, others may think otherwise.

EDIT: Yes, it should be noted that the major scale is the "default" scale.
#12
TBH, looking at this and your other thread, either you theory teacher isn't doing a very good job or you're not listening in class.

A teacher should set a homework that a class can do, not one that you have to ask an online forum to do for you.