#1
i was reading a list of chords and i came across Eb9 and it got me thinkingggg..

how would you distinguish Eb9 (e chord with a flat 9) from Eb9 (eb chord with a 9)?
#2
Eb9 denotes a chord built off of Eb with the following intervals: 1-3-5-b7-9
An Eb (I'm assuming you mean major) chord with as added b9 would be described as Ebaddb9 (1-3-5-b9). An Eb dominant chord with a lowered 9th would be described as Eb7b9 (1-3-5-b7-b9).
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#3
Eb9 is not E(b9)
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#5
Quote by Archeo Avis
Eb9 denotes a chord built off of Eb with the following intervals: 1-3-5-b7-9
An Eb (I'm assuming you mean major) chord with as added b9 would be described as Ebaddb9 (1-3-5-b9). An Eb dominant chord with a lowered 9th would be described as Eb7b9 (1-3-5-b7-b9).

I've never seen that, but I guess it makes sense in a confusing situation like this.
#6
Quote by one vision
I've never seen that, but I guess it makes sense in a confusing situation like this.


In most situations I'd be content just to call it an altered dominant, but I guess if you're deadset on having the b9...
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#8
An E with a b9 would hardly be used in 1 chord (generally transposed to a lead sheet). And if it would be use it would probably be set as an Emajb9 or Emaj(b9).

Or Some times, the b9 would be smaller written, like in math if u have; (number) to the power of (..). Number being the Chord tone (E) and the latter being the b9 written smaller.

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#9
Quote by one vision
I've never seen that, but I guess it makes sense in a confusing situation like this.

Eb9 --> E major with a dominant flattened ninth? 1-3-5-b7-b9
Eb9 --> E flat major with a dominant ninth? 1-3-5-b7-9
Ebb9 -->E flat major with a dominant flattened ninth? 1-3-5-b7-b9
Correct me if I'm wrong.
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#11
Froboarder, you are wrong on two accounts.

E major with a dominant flattened ninth = E7b9
E flat major with a dominant flattened ninth = Eb7b9

Your description of E7b9 labelled as Eb9 implies the same chord as your second example, Eb dominant 7 with a 9th, and your third example implies a dominant 9th chord built off Ebb (E double flat).
#12
I just learned chord construction, so forgive me.
BUT, from what I've learned:
Take E13, for example. 1-3-5-b7-(9)-(11)-13. That's an E major with a dominant 13th, but you wouldn't call it an E7(13).
So I was thinking the same would apply to this chord.
Also,when you add parantheses, doesn't it imply that it's an add chord, which it isn't?
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#13
TS Archeo summed it up.

You wouldn't come across the problem that was bothering you with a 9th chord.
An E chord with an added b9 is Eaddb9 = 1 3 5 9
An Eb9 chord is an extension of a Eb dominant 7 chord = 1 3 5 b7 9

However you could ask the same question with 6 chords.

How do you determine an E chord with an added b6 from an Eb chord with an added 6.
Eb6 = Eb chord with added 6 = 1 3 5 6
E(b6) = E chord with added b6. = 1 3 5 b6
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