#1
Hi all, I've been lurking for a while and finally made an account. Yay. Anyways, I've been playing for a good 6 months or so, and in this time I've learned the major chords, minor chords, some 7th chords, and barre chords some scales, some riffs from songs i like. I can transition barre chords fluidly and my alternate picking is pretty good, but other than that i feel I'm out of the loop for how long I've been playing. So I've made a practice schedule.

1. 20-30 minutes alternate picking scales with a Metronome.

2. 10-20 minutes of chord transitions(mostly CAGED) with a metronome.

3. 10-20 minutes of theory.

Tell me if there is anything i can add to make it more efficient.

My questions:
-Can anyone point me in the direction of new scales to learn? Such as which ones and where to find them?
-I can't find anywhere with a nice easy to understand lesson on theory, so if someone could point me in the right direction there as well I'd be very grateful.

Thanks a load in advance.
#2
I'm on a book called Fretboard Mastery (i think its called) by Troy Stetina. i really like his books, and there're not just for metal. good for ur theory. I like them

I think ur schedule is fine, good for u that ur practice is constructive. I asume u know pentatonics, do u know modes? I would just get a method/theory book and work through it
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#3
Modes? I've heard that a lot in relation to scales, but I don't know what it is. i learned the scales i know from a friend, so i don't know where to find more.
#4
Quote by CrusaderKing
Hi all, I've been lurking for a while and finally made an account. Yay. Anyways, I've been playing for a good 6 months or so, and in this time I've learned the major chords, minor chords, some 7th chords, and barre chords some scales, some riffs from songs i like. I can transition barre chords fluidly and my alternate picking is pretty good, but other than that i feel I'm out of the loop for how long I've been playing. So I've made a practice schedule.

1. 20-30 minutes alternate picking scales with a Metronome.

2. 10-20 minutes of chord transitions(mostly CAGED) with a metronome.

3. 10-20 minutes of theory.

Tell me if there is anything i can add to make it more efficient.

My questions:
-Can anyone point me in the direction of new scales to learn? Such as which ones and where to find them?
-I can't find anywhere with a nice easy to understand lesson on theory, so if someone could point me in the right direction there as well I'd be very grateful.

Thanks a load in advance.


Well, all your stuff, is just, boring...

Try puttign in some time to learn songs you like and stuff like, thats important of ull lose motivation quick...
#5
Well before all I really did was look for easy songs I liked and play them, but I'm dissapointed at how fast I'm improving. Thus, the practice schedule.
#6
best way to improve...
learn one new song each day... not the intro, not one of the riffs, but the entire thing...
try 3 doors down... their songs are good for beginner/novice players...
etays69 is right... if u just practice boring stuff u ll lose motivation...
but the stuff u do IS important too...
#7
From what you've posted there you're doing a bit too much practicing and not enough playing - remember exercises are a means to an end, not an end in themselves. You do picking exercises to improve your technique, you learn scales to help you understand music better, both when learning other people's songs and writing your own. There's little point amassing this knowledge unless you're going to be using it. You're not going to improve any faster with your practice schedule, all you'll do is get good at the exercises you're repeating and that ain't playing the guitar. 6 months is a very short time, that's barely enough time for your body to get to grips with the basic mechanics of it all so don't expect miracles. This all takes a long time, and yes, it IS frustrating not being able to do what you want with the instrument but that's just the way it goes.

That means start getting some songs under your belt, there's no point "learning" any more scales as you're not actually using the ones you already know. Also I'm assuming that you haven't actually learned the scales themselves, but rather one or two single positions which again is of limited use. Far better to focus on learning and understanding one scale and figuring out how to use it rather than learning isolated bits. Remember, if you haven't learned theory then you haven't learned anything about scales....have a read of Josh Urban's Crusade articles in the columns section.
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#8
Quote by CrusaderKing
-I can't find anywhere with a nice easy to understand lesson on theory, so if someone could point me in the right direction there as well I'd be very grateful.

steven seagull already said it, but here's the link:
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/search.php?s=crusade&w=columns
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#9
Thanks for the link manbox, and for the helpful info Steven. I'd like to improve as quick as possible, as when I jam with my friends I feel a bit left out when they have such a larger base of knowledge of music than I do. I realize that there isn't a magic method to make me a guitar god, I am just looking for the most efficient practice routine possible. I'm willing to put all the time and effort in, so I may reap the rewards later.
#10
I'm a beginner myself , but anyways I'll give my two cents:

My own schedule consists of this (and i have a lot of time on my hands, so don't worry much about practicing a ton, but make sure you do it correctly and not sloppily).

1.Warm-ups (1/2 hr), you know something to get the fingers going, i usually do some simple frettboard exercies using all of my fingers

2. Scales (1 hour), i try to do 4 tones, going up and down two-octaves,in a few types (major, minor, pentatonic, etc...)

3. Chords (1 hour), I'll usually do a few simple basic chord progressions , and then work on new ones

4. Music Theory (2 hours), this part is the more tedious part, looking through books and stuff, not much guitar playing, but a core element to being a good musician

5. Work on new material (1-2 hours), this is where i work on getting down new songs, or licks. i'll usually break anything i'm doing down into smaller managable parts

6. Play stuff i already know (1 hour), this is the fun part, which is what i like to end off a tedious day with. I play stuff i like and know well so i don't become rusty and forget things


A little note on music theory, if you can't find a teacher (which is the best bet), a really good theory book is "the complete idiot's guide to music theory", i've reviewed a few and it seems to be the best. Another good set of guitar books are the guitar grimoire series.

well thats all i have to say
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#11
Looking through your schedule I was thinking pretty much what Mr. Seagul said, that you need some simple songs to practice with as well. I think what you are doing is fine, but every other day I would work on a song or two. Listen to the first couple podcast on theory from Desi Serna: http://www.talkshoe.com/talkshoe/web/talkCast.jsp?masterId=37557&cmd=tc

He does a nice job framing the basics.

Also www.justinguitar.com has lots of nice suggestions for begining players.
#12
I think the major issue with your schedule is your focus on time. Time is irrelevant when you want to improve. What's better, doing 20mins or being able to state what you achieved? I would lose the timings and instead replace them with targets that you want to try and meet each session.

How fast do you want to play (metronome mark)? How much do you want to learn (number of bars)? What theory (knowledge gained)? Etc. . .

If at the end of each session you can say that you have made positive steps towards your targets you will know you have practised well and will have a greater sense of achievement. Much more so than if you can merely tell yourself how many minutes you did.