#1
Okay im going to be as kind as i can. but theres no use giving people a list of guitars and saying okay now which one should i get. you really have to pick for yourself, yes we can tip you on which ways to lean for a first guitar or whats best in a certain price range but its all up to you. You need to go try them out for yourself. otherwise your going to be buying a guitar based on how other people feel, only you can decided if you like the weight, look, feel, playability ect. so go try out some guitars and find out what you like talk to the guys at your local guitarstore, they are absolutley more than happy to help you out and show u guitars that suit what you like.

Dont let the mistake of choosing the wrong first guitar affect this awesome hobby/profession because once you start and get the gear which you like best. it will provide you with years and years of enjoyment and self satisfaction
Guitars
Jackson js30rr 6-string fixed bridge
Schecter Demon 6-sting fixed bridge
Ibanez RGR421EXFM 6-string fixed bridge
Amplifiers/Pedals
Peavy Envoy 110 40watt
Boss ML-2 Metal Core Distortion Pedal
MXR KFK-1 Ten Band Equalizer
#3
This might sound a bit daft, but...

As one who bought his first guitar (yes, it was a Squier) six months ago, I can safely say that whilst it's all well and good saying "try before you buy", it's only really applicable to players with enough background to be able to sensibly evaluate what they're trying, by which I mean they must have been exposed to guitars in some way, shape, or form before entering the shop.

Think about it like this...

Did you buy your first car before you learned to drive? I certainly didn't. By the time I got round to buying a car, I knew how to operate one. Consequently, when I test drove cars, I could make observations like "I don't like the clutch in this one", and "I like the engine in that one". Had I been unable to drive, it would have down to, erm, price and colour (not seat comfort, because unless you're actually operating the controls, you can't make that call), because making a reasonable judgement on the actual important points of the car would have been completely impossible because I wouldn't have been able to work one.

That's what it's like buying that first guitar for many folks.

Note : For an interesting, practical example of this phenomenon, next time you're in your local music store, go irritate the staff by asking to try out some flutes, then attempt to make a judgement as to which one's the best for you.

Note regarding the Other Note : This clearly doesn't work for existing flautists.
Oh, now I've gone and spilled my tea. This really won't do at all.
#4
yes we can tip you on which ways to lean for a first guitar or whats best in a certain price range but its all up to you.


i already said we have no problem helping but in the end its all up to how they feel about it. same goes for you do you go on car forums and ask which car should i buy out of these 3 :p sure we people on the forum can help but non the less shouldnt be making the decision for the person. the guitar should appeal to the person buying it not the people giving advise

and also people at guitarstores usually have no problems helping out begineers in choosing there first guitar it kinda called doing there job and part of being a salesperson.
Guitars
Jackson js30rr 6-string fixed bridge
Schecter Demon 6-sting fixed bridge
Ibanez RGR421EXFM 6-string fixed bridge
Amplifiers/Pedals
Peavy Envoy 110 40watt
Boss ML-2 Metal Core Distortion Pedal
MXR KFK-1 Ten Band Equalizer
Last edited by SorteDiaboli at Nov 12, 2008,
#5
Quote by CarpUK
This might sound a bit daft, but...

As one who bought his first guitar (yes, it was a Squier) six months ago, I can safely say that whilst it's all well and good saying "try before you buy", it's only really applicable to players with enough background to be able to sensibly evaluate what they're trying, by which I mean they must have been exposed to guitars in some way, shape, or form before entering the shop.

Think about it like this...

Did you buy your first car before you learned to drive? I certainly didn't. By the time I got round to buying a car, I knew how to operate one. Consequently, when I test drove cars, I could make observations like "I don't like the clutch in this one", and "I like the engine in that one". Had I been unable to drive, it would have down to, erm, price and colour (not seat comfort, because unless you're actually operating the controls, you can't make that call), because making a reasonable judgement on the actual important points of the car would have been completely impossible because I wouldn't have been able to work one.

That's what it's like buying that first guitar for many folks.

Note : For an interesting, practical example of this phenomenon, next time you're in your local music store, go irritate the staff by asking to try out some flutes, then attempt to make a judgement as to which one's the best for you.

Note regarding the Other Note : This clearly doesn't work for existing flautists.


I couldn't agree more. I got the same kind of advice when I asked a couple years ago. "You need to play it and see what you like best". I went to the guitar stores, held the guitar, picked at the strings, and tried to strum the open strings, but none of it mattered. I couldn't even form a chord. How was I supposed to know if it felt good or bad, or how it played? It wasn't until months later that I started to appreciate the sound, the playability, and the differences from one guitar to another. I'm fortunate that I've had a MIM strat and my Ibanez RG3 from the beginning because at first my wife thought she wanted to play too, so I've been able to quickly learn the differences in styles in terms of feel and sound, but when I was first buying, I had no idea. I chose my Ibanez because of the quilted maple top.

Unfortunately, if you're at the bottom looking up, the best thing you really can do is to trust the opinions of others. The hard part here is figuring out whose advice suits you best and isn't simply what they like best.
#6
What everyone else has said... You can't pick a guitar well if you've no (or little) experience of guitar in general. It's like asking someone who doesn't do wine tasting to distinguish between wines, it just won't work.