#1
I have been trying to write songs for the past 6 months. I have played guitar for 3 years down and a decent rhythm player.

But whenever I write I can't seem to get over using the same 3 chords per song. The chords change depending on what the song is, but what 3 or four chords are in the intro, I use throughout the whole song.

One of the guitarists in my band (who is also my best friend) told me everything I write is really boring to play. Looking back at all I wrote, I can easily notice it now. I guess where I'm a vocalist I tend to write easier stuff since I don't really play too much guitar.

So how exactly can I break this? And the link below is an mp3 of my favorite song I have written, but also shows what I'm talking about.

Link to song

Thanks
#2
It'll come to you eventually. You can't force it. The only thing you really can do is study chord progressions in a lot of different styles of music.
#4
Start trying to riff. Just get away from simple chord progressions for a while and then it will come easier.
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This, stockylachy, if i was a woman, i would want you to have my babies...

Wait...
#5
Well it also could be because u're writing too generic, With that said i kind of mean that u just blur out alot of songs without actually, Feeling them/Paying Attention.

This could be because like you said, You are the singer of the band so u prolly pay more attention to what you're singing/lyric writing.

This COULD be you're problem, It is what i had like a year ago, Since then i payed more attention to my guitar then my lyrics.


(Now it's the other way around cause now i neglect my lyric writing XD)
ALL HAIL HYPNOTOAD

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#6
Quote by ltd v100
the more you write full songs the easyer it will become for you


i don't totally agree as ive been trying to write songs for years. i can make up all the instruments but never the words. i keep trying but it just doesnt work. help?
#7
You're having trouble writing songs because you're not a very good songwriter. Songwriting is a skill like any other, and becoming good at it takes large amounts of practice. Start practicing.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#8
Quote by Archeo Avis
You're having trouble writing songs because you're not a very good songwriter. Songwriting is a skill like any other, and becoming good at it takes large amounts of practice. Start practicing.

Most people wold take that as a smartass answer, but that actually enlightened me. What are things I could work on to improve songwriting?
#10
Quote by ChevyChe 23
Most people wold take that as a smartass answer, but that actually enlightened me. What are things I could work on to improve songwriting?


I assure you, it wasn't intended as a smartass answer.
Music theory won't make you a good songwriter, but it will give you the tools you need to understand and communicate what you're writing. I therefore strongly recommend learning as much theory as you can. A good place to start would be the crusades articles on this site. Another set of essential skills are aural skills. You should be able to hear a simple melody in your head and play it on your instrument perfectly. Practice listening to melodies on the television (say, the Simpson's theme) and playing them on your instrument. Work on memorizing the sounds of different intervals to make it easier.

The next is obviously to practice writing itself. Start by identifying exactly what it is that you're having trouble with. Are you having trouble writing a melody? Try this: Pick three notes at random. Spend some time exhausting every melodic possibility contained within those three notes (and there are a lot of them). Explore every permutation of those notes, every note value, every time signature, and every key (trying playing in different harmonic contexts). Once you exhausted every possibility, add another note, and repeat the process over again. Putting yourself in a box like this forces you to get the most out of what little you have available (a lot of people, when presented with the freedom to do anything, tend to do nothing).

Having trouble writing chord progressions? Study counterpoint and harmony (A good book on the subject would be Piston's Harmony). Learn how different chords within a key function and lead to and from one another. Practice creating a releasing tension with a progressions. Practice modulating to different keys, and pay attention to the effect is produces.

Having trouble developing a theme? Study different forms within Western music. Pick apart your favorite songs and see exactly how the theme is developed throughout the work. Study sonata form (thematic development perfected) and study works in sonata form and, again, pick them apart and see exactly how the theme is developed. Then, practice doing the same thing. Take a melody you've created and write a short little piece and have it mirror the development of a work you're particularly fond of.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#11
Quote by Archeo Avis
I assure you, it was intended as a smartass answer.
Music theory won't make you a good songwriter, but it will give you the tools you need to understand and communicate what you're writing. I therefore strongly recommend learning as much theory as you can. A good place to start would be the crusades articles on this site. Another set of essential skills are aural skills. You should be able to hear a simple melody in your head and play it on your instrument perfectly. Practice listening to melodies on the television (say, the Simpson's theme) and playing them on your instrument. Work on memorizing the sounds of different intervals to make it easier.

The next is obviously to practice writing itself. Start by identifying exactly what it is that you're having trouble with. Are you having trouble writing a melody? Try this: Pick three notes at random. Spend some time exhausting every melodic possibility contained within those three notes (and there are a lot of them). Explore every permutation of those notes, every note value, every time signature, and every key (trying playing in different harmonic contexts). Once you exhausted every possibility, add another note, and repeat the process over again. Putting yourself in a box like this forces you to get the most out of what little you have available (a lot of people, when presented with the freedom to do anything, tend to do nothing).

Having trouble writing chord progressions? Study counterpoint and harmony (A good book on the subject would be Piston's Harmony). Learn how different chords within a key function and lead to and from one another. Practice creating a releasing tension with a progressions. Practice modulating to different keys, and pay attention to the effect is produces.

Having trouble developing a theme? Study different forms within Western music. Pick apart your favorite songs and see exactly how the theme is developed throughout the work. Study sonata form (thematic development perfected) and study works in sonata form and, again, pick them apart and see exactly how the theme is developed. Then, practice doing the same thing. Take a melody you've created and write a short little piece and have it mirror the development of a work you're particularly fond of.
Fix'd?

Anyway, completely agree. To add to this, I think people should force themselves to write music.
#12
To add to this, I think people should force themselves to write music.


I agree with this agreement with my post.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#13
Quote by Archeo Avis
I agree with this agreement with my post.
I agree to this agreement of my post of agreeance.
#14
Quote by demonofthenight
I agree to this agreement of my post of agreeance.


I acknowledge your agreement and reestablish my agreement with it.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#15
Quote by Archeo Avis
I acknowledge your agreement and reestablish my agreement with it.
Your tertiary agreement is duly noted and complimented with another agreement.

Okay, this is going to get idiotic and ban worthy in a few moments.
#16
Okay, this is going to get idiotic and ban worthy in a few moments.


I agree.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#17
I see what you did thar, seriously though that was a great post Archeo. It helped me and I was just browsing not expecting to be educated.

Thanks
#18
Quote by Helpy Helperton
I see what you did thar, seriously though that was a great post Archeo. It helped me and I was just browsing not expecting to be educated.

Thanks


I aim to please.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.