#1


So the picture is really bad quality but I think it get the image across.

Anyways, I recently changed my strings and while playing today, I noticed that the angle of my bridge was really high.

I can still play and everything but now, I can't use my whammy bar at all because the angle is so high, the bridge block inside the guitar is resting up against the wood of the guitar and I'm not sure if this will have any negative consequences in the future.

Do you guys know how to fix this and how to prevent this in the future?
#2
Did you go to a heavier gauge strings?

Anyway, the solution is to unscrew the plate covering the trem cavity on the back of the guitar. You want to tighten those springs so it pulls the bridge down.

And yes, this can have very negative consequences in the future. Fix it.
#4
detune your guitar DOWN detune your strings.. all of them .
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#5
That was caused by using heavier-gauge strings than your guitar is set-up for (i.e. 12's instead of 10's) . I did the same thing to my guitar and it effectively neuters the tremolo arm.

I've been using Ernie Ball Slinky's since but still notice that the bridge has never returned to its normal position.

So, while your guitar once had whammy bar functioning, it now works more like a fixed bridge. Oddly enough, I can whammy all day pulling pitches up without breaking strings but lowering it is near impossible.
#7
Higher gauge strings need to be at a higher tension to be in tune. That upset the default balance with the springs in the back cavity of your Strat. You can either add another spring as suggested or try really screwing the claw deeply in the guitar. Adding another spring will produce a different feel than trying to get by with just the trem claw in further. Neither feeling will really be the same as with the guitar set with 9s. I'm not saying worse, it should just be a little different. Also, when you change string gauges like that you're likely going to throw off your intonation.
#8
Thanks a lot guys.

I've fixed it for the most part. Just a bit of fine-tuning to do but I at least what to do.
#9
Quote by Discgolf
That was caused by using heavier-gauge strings than your guitar is set-up for (i.e. 12's instead of 10's) . I did the same thing to my guitar and it effectively neuters the tremolo arm.

I've been using Ernie Ball Slinky's since but still notice that the bridge has never returned to its normal position.

So, while your guitar once had whammy bar functioning, it now works more like a fixed bridge. Oddly enough, I can whammy all day pulling pitches up without breaking strings but lowering it is near impossible.


That's REALLY bad for the guitar if you leave it like that. See my first post in this thread and fix your guitar.
#10
Quote by tigerking615
That's REALLY bad for the guitar if you leave it like that. See my first post in this thread and fix your guitar.


Just to ask, I finished adjusting my bridge and now it's slightly lower than where it was before. Is that also going to be a major problem.
#12
You're lips are astonishingly red. And it bothers me...


Just tighten the trem springs down, or add another spring.
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#13
What the hell,from 9's to 10's and it went up that high?Are you sure you changed to 10's?
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#14
Um I had the same problem as BigNoobie so I tried to tighten the springs in the back but everytime I do the screws pop out. Any suggestions on what to do?
#15
MR roboto, loosen that screw add wood epoxy into that hole. let harden. redrill and rescrew into the hole. the screw should be good as new, if not better.

if that's beyond your usual fix it ability. unscrew the screw. add a toothpick.
with no springs attached. put A SLIGHTLY LONGER not thicker, screw back in, level with the other one. screw in thru the toothpick.


add an extra spring if you have 3 now, make sure you have 4.


the screw should hold and the springs will take tension off the screws.

your last and other easy option is to also block the bridge. put a block of wood at the correct thickness all the way to the right of this picture, so the trem bar cant move anymore.



Listen TS, this is why you dont over use those screws. when in doubt Add A SPRING.
or you can rip out a screw.


and like said. you want a balanced bridge, not one that dips or raises up.

there is a set up guide for fender styles at the top of the page too, tutorial first post.
Jenneh

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Last edited by jj1565 at Nov 13, 2008,
#16
Quote by tigerking615
You want it to sit level on the bridge. Check out this guide:
http://ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=614226

Go to the section where it says "tremolo angle for different kinds of FRs" and click yours. That should show you how the trem should sit.

Basically, if it's below the guitar, loosen the springs. If it's above, tighten.


Is that a Floyd Rose bridge he has? I can't tell from the picture.
#17
no it's not.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

Recognised by the Official EG/GG&A/GB&C WTLT Lists 2011