#1
Is there a guitar teacher site? Dedicated for helping Teacher and stuff? If not we can make this a guitar teacher thread.
A.K.A. Titanguy
#2
sounds good. i teach fulltime i like it normally.

i find adult pupils exceptionally tough to teach tho. they seem to have learning difficulties compared to kids.
#3
right now i'm in the process of deciding if i should go to school for a degree in classical guitar,
or a degree in classical guitar/emphasized teaching

any opinions?
Quote by joshjhasarrived
Little does the government suspect that it's funds are being rapidly drained through funding infinite free cardboard boxes to bored teenagers on an internet forum.
#4
I have 4 adults tomm. and 2 kids. Im scared to be honest with you. I have a game plan and what i want to teach them. I'm teaching groups. 2,3,2. I have 40 minutes each with them. Im really excited but scared.
A.K.A. Titanguy
#6
Quote by victoryaloy
right now i'm in the process of deciding if i should go to school for a degree in classical guitar,
or a degree in classical guitar/emphasized teaching

any opinions?


Can't really help, sorry. Have you taught before? Do you teach? Do you like it?
#7
Quote by Freepower
Can't really help, sorry. Have you taught before? Do you teach? Do you like it?


Ye this. This is really a personal thing. You must decide for ur own if u wanna teach or not.

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??
#8
i wouldn't love to teach.. i've tought people before but they've all been friends, i loved it but i dont know about strangers.
i'd hate to see people come for a few weeks and quit.

i would prefer to just go to school for guitar, but after college what jobs are available for a bachelor of arts in classical guitar?


Edit:
Another way to put it is.. I want i career in music, and if the only way to go about it would be teaching, then yeah i wouldn't mind teaching.
Quote by joshjhasarrived
Little does the government suspect that it's funds are being rapidly drained through funding infinite free cardboard boxes to bored teenagers on an internet forum.
Last edited by victoryaloy at Nov 13, 2008,
#9
I'm starting to teach somebody. She doesn't have her own guitar yet, so obviously I'm limited to what I can show her (since she can't practice anything).

At the moment, I'm planning to teach her the basic open chords and a standard 1-2-3-4 chromatic exercise to get better at picking. Could anyone offer me any advice on what else I could add or how I could improve this?

Thanks for any help
#10
I would recommend giving her the guitar chords and stuff but don't burn them out on all the technical stuff. Teach them a few licks they can play around with and show off.
A.K.A. Titanguy
#11
Quote by michal23
I'm starting to teach somebody. She doesn't have her own guitar yet, so obviously I'm limited to what I can show her (since she can't practice anything).

At the moment, I'm planning to teach her the basic open chords and a standard 1-2-3-4 chromatic exercise to get better at picking. Could anyone offer me any advice on what else I could add or how I could improve this?

Thanks for any help

You could give her a suitable riff to practise instead of mind numbing chromatics. The 1-2-3-4 thing has been good for me when I have decided I am going to be disciplined but it could bore a begginer.
#12
If you are teaching for money and money alone then you are in it for the wrong reasons. You have to want to educate and assist. Teachers that purely do it for financial gain are the bane of my life.
#13
It's not an easy option. The money can be OK but to be a good teacher you need to put in the time outside of lessons to prepare properly.

There's also the danger of teaching how you were taught, or sticking to a prescribed syllabus. Each student is unique and it requires great flexibility to adapt to each ones needs. Don't assume because you taught them that they understood.

I see my role as a teacher to teach the student to teach themselves (mainly to listen properly). If they get to a stage where they can teach themselves and don't need me any longer then I'm very satisfied.
#14
^

At the minute because of the multi-instrumental nature of my work and the level of the students I'm probably doing as much prep as teaching.

Quote by RichieJovie
If you are teaching for money and money alone then you are in it for the wrong reasons. You have to want to educate and assist. Teachers that purely do it for financial gain are the bane of my life.


#15
Well, I like teaching sometimes. I don't like teaching if I have to go out of my way though. Like, if I'm practicing something I'm not going to stop and say 'Hey! Let me show you something!' Like, when I'm on here though - not actually practicing, but more like learning from other people's ideas, their mistakes, and Freepower - I love to pass on some of the knowledge I've taken from this site...and Freepower...Freepower has helped me to understand that I have to SLOW THE HELL DOWN before I can go into lightning fast licks...

I DO know that I like PLAYING for other people rather than teaching them.

By the way, if there are any teachers on this site from North-West Iowa...I'd be glad to take some lessons on technique and stuff. I do know that my technique isn't as good as it is and I also know that actual lessons would help me tremendously.

When people can take two years of lessons and be 5x better than me when I've been playing almost 5!...yeah, sounds to me like lessons would help me out a ton!


Ahem...I would like to take this time to thank Freepower, UG, Freepower, my first guitar teacher (Joe), Freepower, my second guitar teacher (Ruth), Freepower, my sh*tty band instructor (He has helped me with very little...nonetheless, he has helped), and most of all, Freepower.

Did I get my point across?
Last edited by The.new.guy at Nov 14, 2008,
#17
At the moment, I'm planning to teach her the basic open chords and a standard 1-2-3-4 chromatic exercise to get better at picking. Could anyone offer me any advice on what else I could add or how I could improve this?

I start with single note studies , and try to build up the repetoire as quickly as possible , its easy to see which technical areas need improving in the context of a song , and also whcih areas of thoery to cover .
some sort of a performance , (even to a mirror ? )
is important as soon as possible too , imho
#18
Quote by victoryaloy
right now i'm in the process of deciding if i should go to school for a degree in classical guitar,
or a degree in classical guitar/emphasized teaching

any opinions?

If you want a steady career and future, I would go into a concurrent teaching program. That's what I'm doing (second year).

Make sure you get another subject, maybe a popular one like english or math, and BAM, you're garanteed a job at a school. You could announce yourself as a full-time english teacher, and then tell them you are also qualified to teach music. It's a win-win situation.

Just my two cents though.

EDIT: With regards to actual teaching. I'm sort of an intern for a music teacher at a school and I help him with his ensembles to help them get ready for school functions and concerts, etc. Let me tell you, and I think Freepower would agree, it's not easy. You might think "Oh, teaching, it's just talking explaining stuff." Nah. You'll have moments where you want to rip the strings off your guitar and choke the student. But its the most rewarding thing when they say "Ohhhh I get it, thanks".

TL;DR It's hard, yet rewarding.
Last edited by one vision at Nov 14, 2008,
#19
^ oh yeah. You've really got to watch out for "the nod" as well.

Can you play A E and D, Jimmy?

*nod*

Play them for me.

*can't*

Watch for it because if pupils don't understand, they'll nod.

That can be pretty tough. Also, you wouldn't believe how out of time some kids get. One great thing about the place I teach is that there's always a spare drumkit to play to keep a solid pulse (not that I can drum, but I can play a beat or two ).