#1
When you strum chords, say all quavers....
On the right hand, when you switch, how do you convert the right hand from a C to a G say. Cause your strumming five strings on the up...and then all 6 on the down, and it seems to be hard to miss the 6th string on the last up strum of the C.
#3
Quote by Lum
When you strum chords, say all quavers....
On the right hand, when you switch, how do you convert the right hand from a C to a G say. Cause your strumming five strings on the up...and then all 6 on the down, and it seems to be hard to miss the 6th string on the last up strum of the C.


When playing the Open C Chord if you can wrap your thumb around on the top to mute the E string that would suffice.

Lank
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#4
yeah wrap your thumb on the E, strumming especially when faster doesnt have to be perfect
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#5
If you cant wrap your thumb around, like me, then use your ring finger to mute it. Just extend it slightly farther. Or.. if you're playing Cadd9/C2 then use your middle finger to mute it.
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#6
Yeh and what about playing D? because I wouldnt want to mute 2 strings...
#7
That one just requires accuracy. You can't really trick playing a clean D.

When you're strumming, your arm should not be the driving force. Your wrist should be.

What do I mean by that? Your wrist should be doing most of the strumming, not your arm. 70% wrist, 30% arm or so. Using your wrist will promote accuracy and control. If you use your arm, your whole arm will need to have extreme accuracy. If you strum with your wrist, all you need to control is your hand accuracy. Controlling your hand is much easier than controlling your whole arm.

A good strummer's arm will barely move up and down. The wrist will do most of the work. Strumming with your wrist is more of a rolling wrist action as opposed to strumming with the arm, which is an up and down motion.
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- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#9
The thumb is a bad habit.
Although effective.

Just play and practice, don't worry so much about this.
Eventually you will unknowingly play all your chords well.
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#10
I dunno, I wouldn't call it a bad habit. It's a bad habit if you're a strict classical player, but in the world of every day acoustic guitar playing, effective is what you want, not just proper. My brother always tells me that it's cheating, but I just reply back with "who plays better?" That usually shuts him up
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#11
Quote by captivate
That one just requires accuracy. You can't really trick playing a clean D.

When you're strumming, your arm should not be the driving force. Your wrist should be.

What do I mean by that? Your wrist should be doing most of the strumming, not your arm. 70% wrist, 30% arm or so. Using your wrist will promote accuracy and control. If you use your arm, your whole arm will need to have extreme accuracy. If you strum with your wrist, all you need to control is your hand accuracy. Controlling your hand is much easier than controlling your whole arm.

A good strummer's arm will barely move up and down. The wrist will do most of the work. Strumming with your wrist is more of a rolling wrist action as opposed to strumming with the arm, which is an up and down motion.



This actually helped me a lot with my strumming. I strummed (a while ago) my first chord about a year ago, very awkwardly and beginner like, so when I did it my friend says "Do it with your wrist not your arm, if you do it with your arm you won't be getting as good a rhythm as if you did it with your arm"

More then one benefit while using this technique.