#1
Hi Guys

I have been playing now for about a year now and I know my minor and major pentatonic scales. I also understand where the root notes are in the scales aswell. But, man, my solos are just rubbish! I can only really follow the scale up and down with a real slight variation. I do start and end on the root note...Is that the right thing to do?

I hear solo's from people like Angus and I can't believe they are playing the same scale as what I am... I don't know where I'm going wrong...

Does anyone have any tips to help improving soloing...I seem to hear all these fast high notes being played by the greats when they are soloing... I want to do that but ain't got a clue where to pick up these techniques from...

Any type of suggestion would be great.

I'm really into ACDC, Guns, Motley, that sort of stuff...


Getting really frustrated. Is there any kind of formulars that people use which make solo's just sound right? i.e up on the minor, down on the major?

Thanks in advance.....
#2
you don't have to start or end on the root all the time, ending on the root gives a real strong feeling that your passage has ended (or a little part of it has anyway), I play around with this a little, avoiding the root on purpose can keep listeners interested and on their toes.

Try not to run the scale up and down, but take a selection of notes from the scale and make something from them.
#3
Quote by Helpy Helperton
you don't have to start or end on the root all the time, ending on the root gives a real strong feeling that your passage has ended (or a little part of it has anyway), I play around with this a little, avoiding the root on purpose can keep listeners interested and on their toes.

Try not to run the scale up and down, but take a selection of notes from the scale and make something from them.


well you said everything i have to say lol. well done
#4
Ye and work with rhythmical ideas and little motifs, or with building tension up to a high note (or a low note).

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
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#5
Dynamic!! Take it slow, then speed up, wherever the feeling takes you. Play all the notes of the pentatonic on one or two strings and throw in a few that aren't part of it. Learn all the different shapes of the pentatonic, that sort of thing.
Quote by ravioli123
James, a type of sandwich:

A sandwich that consists of ham, turkey, roast beef, shredded cheese, nacho cheese doritos, and ranch on a toasted bun.
"Hey man lets go get a couple James's for lunch"
#6
Quote by ravioli123
Dynamic!! Take it slow, then speed up, wherever the feeling takes you. Play all the notes of the pentatonic on one or two strings and throw in a few that aren't part of it. Learn all the different shapes of the pentatonic, that sort of thing.


YES!!! This lol. It is true; dynamics are what separates the good guitar players from the best, well almost lool.

Show that u really mean it. Play every note as if without it you would die. Play all ur bends as perfect to let ur girlfriend cry. Play every fast lick so clean that the rhythm will drive people to the point of insanity. When playing live, when ur done with ur solo, look to audience with a look that ur getting "some" tonight.

I am serious, except for the live part, but it's a nice addition on a friday night.

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??
#7
Quote by Guitarism12
well you said everything i have to say lol. well done


just trying to save you some time
#8
Quote by xxdarrenxx
YES!!! This lol. It is true; dynamics are what separates the good guitar players from the best, well almost lool.

Show that u really mean it. Play every note as if without it you would die. Play all ur bends as perfect to let ur girlfriend cry. Play every fast lick so clean that the rhythm will drive people to the point of insanity. When playing live, when ur done with ur solo, look to audience with a look that ur getting "some" tonight.

I am serious, except for the live part, but it's a nice addition on a friday night.

Lol, It also helps to listen to Dire Straits. Or anything like that, practice with backing tracks, live bands, play along with live recordings and really listen to what they are doing in the improv and where they are going. You aren't going to get good at soloing overnight, just play anything and everything, play through the shit until you hit your sweet creative centre
Quote by ravioli123
James, a type of sandwich:

A sandwich that consists of ham, turkey, roast beef, shredded cheese, nacho cheese doritos, and ranch on a toasted bun.
"Hey man lets go get a couple James's for lunch"
#9
Quote by ravioli123
Lol, It also helps to listen to Dire Straits. Or anything like that, practice with backing tracks, live bands, play along with live recordings and really listen to what they are doing in the improv and where they are going. You aren't going to get good at soloing overnight, just play anything and everything, play through the shit until you hit your sweet creative centre


Once again I feel obliged to say:

THIS

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??
#10
If you feel you just run the scale straight up and down - don't. Just say "today I will not play any scale tones directly beside each other, or two in row ascending or descending".

If you hear high notes and don't know how they reach them, then you don't understand how scales are moved around the neck - see theory links in my sig.

If you need more help with making your solos interesting - http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/the_guide_to/phrasing_for_dummies.html
#11
You dont have to gram all of the notes of the scale in every lick, you need to learn how to phrase better, search phrasing
#12
in rock music, having your own unique voice isn't really about note choice, because everyone plays pretty much the same notes

like the others have said, it's more about:

(random thoughts here)

tone

vibrato - this is huge... whenever I get a guitar player trying to impress me with lots of 'shredding', I ask them to show me how they add vibrato to a note bent up a semitone... it's one of those subtle, but difficult skills that marks out a good, expressive guitar player from a hack

phrasing... think about things like note density over time... some players play steady streams of notes in their solos, others give you a brief flurry of fast notes followed by a long set of stretched out ones... that kind of thing is what separates rock players more then their choice of pitches

how tight or sloppy you are also has a big impact on how you sound... in music influenced by the blues, you can take liberties with how much you push or pull the spacing in your phrasing... that's how you make it 'breath'... the other extreme is highly regimented & accurate 'shred' type metal playing, where to make it sound stylistically correct, you have to use machine-like accuracy... so decide what effect you're going for, and play accordingly

the same applies for the volume of your notes...


try to introduce larger, more interesting intervals in your playing... consciously try to avoid always creeping up and down pentatonic scales... make intervallic leaps of 5ths, 7ths, 9ths etc...
out of here
#13
I think a good idea to get the most out of the pentatonic scale is to use different techniques with it like legato and tapping. You can also play the scale using 3 notes per string and alternate pick them, because it's a bit annoying to play triplets using 2 notes per string. But if you want to stick to playing in the style of Angus Young and classic rock guitar players then I think you should try to do is mix between the major and minor pentatonic scales. The smoothest way I think is to use modal notes. Use the mixolydian and dorian modes, they work well for me. Don't just play the scale up and down the neck. Try some different rhythmic ideas too, do some bends, just try playing some licks that you like and incorporate them into your playing.
#14
experiment with 2 bars. keep it really simple, try out things like hammer-ons and pull-offs and a bit sliding and of course bending . i was working with A Minor Pentatonic and i really worked out a cool fast lick just today and ive been playin less then one and half year. the best thing is to do hum sth and pull it out of your fretboard. it really works for me. and lastly, have patience . good luck buddy.