#1
So im trying to buy a capo.. and I play both acoustic, classical and hopefully soon electric, the capo i have right now is really bad...
So my question is can I buy the classical G7th capo and use it on all my guitars?(without any repercussions?)

also how do you like the G7th Performance Capo?

and is the G7th Nashville Capo a lot worse? (half the price...)
#2
Any Capo you buy should be fine for all of them.
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#4
classical guitars have a flat fretboard and acoustics have a curbed fretboard, so the classical capo might not work on the acoustic and vice versa
#6
there's some planet waves capos that have a micrometer to adjust your neck radius, that might be a good choice
#7
I have a Planet Waves capo and it works fine for my acoustic but only thing is that it's not the kinda you clamp on you kinda have to twist it on (I suck at explaining things)
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#8
The G7th is, to me at least, the perfect capo. Since it doesn't rely on a heavy duty spring to clamp down the strings, it can be set to the perfect tension for any guitar. I've also got a Kyser which works well with the heavier strings of my acoustic, but it drives the notes sharp when using it on my electric. Too much spring. The G7th won't do that unless you do it yourself when squeezing it together. Plus it's tough as nails so will last for years.
#9
Quote by pezcore333
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never do this, most capos should be good for all though, some might be too short to press all the strings down on a classical guitar. most capos are interchangeable for acoustic and electric but for classical you might want to make sure it fits before you buy
#10
Quote by Sigh3d
So im trying to buy a capo.. and I play both acoustic, classical and hopefully soon electric, the capo i have right now is really bad...
So my question is can I buy the classical G7th capo and use it on all my guitars?(without any repercussions?)

also how do you like the G7th Performance Capo?

and is the G7th Nashville Capo a lot worse? (half the price...)


The Performance capo is AWESOME!!! Best capo ever!!!

the Nashville is good too...it's a spring loaded capo (not a pressure clamp like the Performance)

You could actually just use the Nashville for Electric, acoustic and classical

But it would be BEST to get the Performance Classical for classical guitar because of the neck radius
#11
If you play both classical and a steel-string style guitars then you will need, at the very least, to get separate capos, since steel string guitars have a radiused fretboard and classical guitar boards are almost totally flat. Also, as has already been pointed out, a regular steel-string capo might not reach all the way across the board on a classical.

To which end, I strongly recommend Shubb capos. They are inexpensive, well engineered, affect tuning very little if at all, and most importantly, are very low-profile...interfere with playing very minimally.
Last edited by maxtheaxe at Nov 15, 2008,
#12
Quote by maxtheaxe
If you play both classical and a steel-string style guitars then you will need, at the very least, to get separate capos, since steel string guitars have a radiused fretboard and classical guitar boards are almost totally flat. Also, as has already been pointed out, a regular steel-string capo might not reach all the way across the board on a classical.

To which end, I strongly recommend Shubb capos. They are inexpensive, well engineered, affect tuning very little if at all, and most importantly, are very low-profile...interfere with playing very minimally.



Man, had a LOT of tuning problems with the Shubb...sorry the G 7th is where it's at!!
#13
I was considering the G7 Capo for a while.....then at a show, I noted that the artist was struggling with his G7, and I got the impression that he just couldn't get it to sit well.

The other thing is that I notice that the G7 Performance Capo seems to be only for 12-string, or Classical. I don't care for the design of the "Nashville."
Are most folks using the 12-string version for their 6-stringed instruments?
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Last edited by Soupy1957 at Nov 18, 2008,
#14
Quote by Jeffmo929
Man, had a LOT of tuning problems with the Shubb...sorry the G 7th is where it's at!!


You put it on too tight. Turn the screw, loosen the pressure and your tuning problems go away.
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#15
Quote by AllUrBase
You put it on too tight. Turn the screw, loosen the pressure and your tuning problems go away.



yeah, but that's the thing about the G 7th....no screw!!! Why should you have to deal with that nonsense???! U can just pop on and off the G 7th

it is much easier and better than any other capo, especially when playing live.

#16
Are most folks using the 12-string version for their 6-stringed instruments?
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#17
^ Not sure why you want to. The capo would hang over the edges of the fretboard and get in the way of your fretting hand. Sort of counter-productive to the design of the G7th. 6 for a 6'er and 12 for a 12'er. Classical should be used on those exclusively as the fretboard is typically very flat on a classical, and the G7th Classical capo is flat to match that. If this one is used on a radiused fretboard of a standard steel string acoustic, the capo won't pull all of the strings down with the same tension. The middle ones will be too tight, while the outboard ones will be too loose.
#18
I have an average capo, nothing special, just a couple of bits of metal with a joint and some rubber which means it can bend around whatever shaped fretboard. Cost about a fiver.
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#19
LeftyDave: don't "want to"......just see limited choices.....the Nashville style Capo is not to my liking, and the website for the G7 didn't show an alternative, unless I missed something.

I suppose there must be a "Performance Capo" version for the 6-string, but I didn't see it on their website.......(I COULD just be "gettin old" or something).
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#20
You mean this?


It's the 6 string performance capo, the same one I have. Fantastic little device.

Edit: whoa nellie is that pic ever huge! Sorry captivate...shrink it down for me will ya?
#21
Quote by maxtheaxe
If you play both classical and a steel-string style guitars then you will need, at the very least, to get separate capos, since steel string guitars have a radiused fretboard and classical guitar boards are almost totally flat. Also, as has already been pointed out, a regular steel-string capo might not reach all the way across the board on a classical.

To which end, I strongly recommend Shubb capos. They are inexpensive, well engineered, affect tuning very little if at all, and most importantly, are very low-profile...interfere with playing very minimally.


I agree. I have a Shubb Deluxe Capo. It is much better than cheaper Capos I have tried.
#22
I noted there is a "405" version (or something like that)....is THAT the one for the 6-string acoustic folk guitars?

I see the picture you posted (how could I not) but I didn't hear the actual name of that G7 version.......when I walk into the local Guitar Center, are the G7's for the folk acoustics marked that way?
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#23
Yes, that's the G7th Performance 6 String capo. It'll work for folk guitars just as nice as for dreads and electrics. Probably too short for a 12'er tho, and it's not meant for classical. The one I pictured is their most versatile capo(which of course is why I posted the pic in the first place).
#25
I have 4 x G7th capos, the 3 in the pic are 2 x steel/accoustic & 1 x Nylon or 12 string, the 4th one i have is for banjo





If you note the top capo in the pic is longer & has no radius for classical or 12 string.
Also the standard 6 string G7th fits on my FG260 Yamaha 12 string up till approx fret 6
or 7. I have a pic someplace ill post.



The thing i like best about my G7th is if needed (with a bit of practice) you can re-capo during a piece. I is quite possible to release it slide it up or down a fret or two & reset it in very quick time. COOL
Richard

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Last edited by Dix_Fix at Nov 23, 2008,
#26
Quote by Dix_Fix

The thing i like best about my G7th is if needed (with a bit of practice) you can re-capo during a piece. I is quite possible to release it slide it up or down a fret or two & reset it in very quick time. COOL



i have a cheep 3 dollar one that works perfect and does the exact thing with only sliding it,
and take the amount of a single hand motion
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#27
Dix_Fix: I note that you are the second person I've seen who mounts their G7 upside down.......would you be willing to talk about what led you to that decision? Details, man.........details.......lol

By the way.....I had racked up enough "points" with Amazon.com ($50.00 worth) that I was able to order the G7 for my acoustics, without having to pay a DIME......so it's on order and will be here this week.
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#28
^ It's not upside down, that's how you're supposed to clamp them on, with the hinge end on the low E side of the neck. Otherwise it get's in the way of your fretting hand.
#29
Oops.....my "bad".....I just took another look and saw that it was the angle of the picture that threw me.

I HAVE, however, seen at least one other individual put the G7 with the open end of the capo toward the ceiling......don't know why, unless for some reason it was less of a bother to the left hand.
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#30
P.S.: G7 Capo arrived yesterday........

Observations: It's lighter than I thought it would be.
It works well
It's kinda neat, really
Expensive, but neat
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#31
ive got G7th capo, it works really well on acoustic and electric, wouldnt know about classical though, its a really good capo well worth the money
#32
Dix_Fix: I note that you are the second person I've seen who mounts their G7 upside down.......would you be willing to talk about what led you to that decision? Details, man.........details.......lol


Yeah Soupy1957 I mount my G7th this way as it is easier to use & also doesnt foul your fretting hand as much. It is a lot easier to slide down to the capo if the pivot side of the G7th is on the top side of the fretboard.
Richard

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Last edited by Dix_Fix at Nov 29, 2008,