#1
Hi, currently writing a song where I inverted two power chords, D5 and C5, could someone help me with the name of these inverts?

E ----------------------------
B ----------------------------
G ----------------------------
D ---5---------- 3------------
A ---7-----------5------------
E ----------------------------

Your help is appreciated.
#3
Those aren't inversion, they are minor third intervals.
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#4
They are 2 diads harmonized in minor 3rds

I could tell u more about it if u gave me the key of the song, or the bass notes.

If their bass notes are D and C, then they are D and C minor with no 5th.

Edit: whoops error I meant E and D as bass notes.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Nov 14, 2008,
#5
you dropped the 5th down to a 3rd so a D3 & C3 i guess, what i typically call them but i dont think they have proper names
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#7
Quote by justinb904
you dropped the 5th down to a 3rd so a D3 & C3 i guess


No one is going to know what you're talking about if you call them "D3" and "C3".
They're not chords, they're just intervals. If you insist on treating them like chords, and I don't know why you would, just call them minor chords (the fifth is tonally irrelevant anyway)/
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#8
Quote by Archeo Avis
Those aren't inversion, they are minor third intervals.
Yeah. Just because you invert your fingers across some invisible axis in the middle of them doesn't make a chord an inversion. A chord inversion is when the lowest note of the chord is not the root, something like a standard D major chord with your thumb playing F# on the second fret of the low E string. This would often be written D/F#, but you don't really have to say that the chord is an inversion. For the most part, the performer will take the basics of what is written and do what they want with it, perhaps ignoring your inversion if that note is covered by another instrument (ie the bass guitar).

Iplayguitaralot has the original question right.
#10
Two note arent a chord.

your 7/5 one is E and G, which are part (3rd and 5th) of the Cmaj triad. Once again, not a chord, but more a fragment.

Your 5/3 one is D an F, which could possible be part the first 2 notes (1st and 3rd) of the Dmaj triad. Not a chord.

This could be completely wrong, but this is all I could come up with with my limited knowledge of theory. Good luck and cheers.
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