What They Never Told You About Chord Changes

From twenty years of teaching I'd say that this is the most common gap in understandiing amongst guitarists of all levels.

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What They Never Told You About Chord Changes
6

From twenty years of teaching I'd say that this is the most common gap in understanding amongst guitarists of all levels. Poorly covered, if at all, in all the literature I've read and videos I've watched, it's one of the subjects usually filed in the "keep doing it and you'll get it" section, ie. hit and hope.

Even if you're one of the ones who "got it", defining clearly what we're aiming for in this area can offer great benefits.

In this video I take a look at defining what I'd say are the correct mechanics of chord changes on guitar. This foundational concept is applicable to many other situations, and allows us to approach our problems systematically, letting us monitor results and therefore practice efficiently.

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Old Swanner

7 comments sorted by best / new / date

    dkoobs1
    Thanks for this lesson! I'm really struggling with the open C chord, and also somewhat with the D chord. I've been practicing going between them, but without the up-strum between. Also wasn't practicing going from a chord to itself, that really seems like it will help form the habit of creating the shape above the strings and fretting them all at once, instead of placing fingers down one at a time.
    hayemark
    Fantastic! This kind of exercise with tangible results is really helpful! And explained very well. Thanks!
    oldswanner
    Most welcome, take the idea and run with it.  You can measure just about anything on guitar!
    turner_rocks
    So simple I cant believe I didnt think of it myself.  Simple but brilliant. It makes absolute sense.  Im a begginer.
    oldswanner
    How good are you at changing from a chord to itself?  Plus other little examined concepts.
    oldswanner
    dkoobs1 Glad it helped!  C is the toughest I think, and I often recommend using a capo up the neck to help get used to it, then work down a fret at a time.  Make sure you measure, printouts on my website to aid with that if you want.  Measuring lets you see even the smallest of progress, so you know that what you're doing is working!