Intervals - Finally Explained Part 2

If you are having problems with putting the intervals from theory to the fretboard - I've got the solution.

Intervals - Finally Explained Part 2
9
Welcome to the second part of intervals lesson. It's been a while, but I hope it was worth waiting. I assume, that you know the theory behind this lesson, described in the previous one, if you don't, go back, and assimilate the knowledge. You can find the lesson here. So, knowing the theory, you will be able to understand what's going on here. The point of this lesson is practicing the interval shapes, all over the fretboard. The tabs below, which look like a too long sales slip show up every interval from the root to the octave. There is not much talking here, so getting to the point: 1. Learn the theory behind the intervals, by reading the previous lesson. 2. Play every shape ALL OVER THE FRETBOARD, and try to remember it. 3. Give yourself some time to assimilate the rule of changing the shapes of the intervals that land on the B string. As many of my lessons, this is mostly DIY. Remember, that reading the lessons doesn't make you a better guitarist. Grab your guitar NOW, and try every example! :) Also, important thing is that you don't rush trough this, and practice slowly and methodically. Getting to remember all the shapes can take some time, and it's more like few weeks than few days. Be patient and precise. Here's the list. *** 0 semitones : root C to C
E |----------||
B |----------||
G |----------||
D |----------||
A |----------||
E |--8--8----||
*** 1 semitone : minor second - from C to Db
E |----------|----------||
B |----------|----------||
G |----------|----------||
D |----------|----------||
A |----------|----------||
E |--8--9----|--9--8----||
*** 2 semitones : major second - from C to D
E |----------|----------||
B |----------|----------||
G |----------|----------||
D |----------|----------||
A |----------|----------||
E |--8--10---|--10-8----||
*** 3 semitones : minor third - from C to Eb
   one string             two strings           
E |----------|----------|----------|----------||
B |----------|----------|----------|----------||
G |----------|----------|----------|----------||
D |----------|----------|----------|----------||
A |----------|----------|-----6----|--6-------||
E |--8--11---|--11-8----|--8-------|-----8----||
*** 4 semitones : major third - from C to E
    one string            two strings           
E |----------|----------|----------|----------||
B |----------|----------|----------|----------||
G |----------|----------|----------|----------||
D |----------|----------|----------|----------||
A |----------|----------|-----7----|--7-------||
E |--8--12---|--12-8----|--8-------|-----8----||
*** 5 semitones : perfect fourth - from C to F
E |----------|----------||
B |----------|----------||
G |----------|----------||
D |----------|----------||
A |-----8----|--8-------||
E |--8-------|-----8----||
*** 6 semitones : tritone - from C to F#
E |----------|----------||
B |----------|----------||
G |----------|----------||
D |----------|----------||
A |-----9----|--9-------||
E |--8-------|-----8----||
*** 7 semitones : perfect fifth - from C to G
E |----------|----------||
B |----------|----------||
G |----------|----------||
D |----------|----------||
A |-----10---|--10------||
E |--8-------|-----8----||
*** 8 semitones : minor sixth - from C to Ab
E |----------|----------||
B |----------|----------||
G |----------|----------||
D |----------|----------||
A |-----11---|--11------||
E |--8-------|-----8----||
*** 9 semitones : major sixth - from C to A
E |----------|----------||
B |----------|----------||
G |----------|----------||
D |-----7----|--7-------||
A |----------|----------||
E |--8-------|-----8----||
*** 10 semitones : minor seventh - from C to Bb
E |----------|----------||
B |----------|----------||
G |----------|----------||
D |-----8----|--8-------||
A |----------|----------||
E |--8-------|-----8----||
*** 11 semitones : major seventh - from C to B
E |----------|----------||
B |----------|----------||
G |----------|----------||
D |-----9----|--9-------||
A |----------|----------||
E |--8-------|-----8----||
*** 12 semitones : octave - from C to C
E |----------|----------||
B |----------|----------||
G |----------|----------||
D |-----10---|--10------||
A |----------|----------||
E |--8-------|-----8----||
*** Important! When the interval "lands" on the B string, you have to alter the higher note, to fit musically. It happens due to the tuning of the B string. (Just to remind - E to A, A to D, D to G, are the strings tuned in perfect fourths, and the G to B is a major third.) Check out the example by playing the perfect fifth shape like this: Perfect fifth shape, but it's not a musically perfect fifth.
E |----------|----------||
B |-----7----|--7-------||
G |--5-------|-----5----||
D |----------|----------||
A |----------|----------||
E |----------|----------||
As you can hear, it's not quite perfect fifth sound. To be exact, it's a tritone. Now, raise the higher note - F# to a G, and you will hear a perfect fifth. Play the example: Correct perfect fifth shape, musically ok.
E |----------|----------||
B |-----8----|--8-------||
G |--5-------|-----5----||
D |----------|----------||
A |----------|----------||
E |----------|----------||
This rule goes to the every interval you will play. Here are the examples of correct interval shapes: Octave:
E |----------|----------||
B |-----13---|--13------||
G |----------|----------||
D |--10------|-----10---||
A |----------|----------||
E |----------|----------||
Pefect fourth:
E |----------|----------||
B |-----6----|--6-------||
G |--5-------|-----5----||
D |----------|----------||
A |----------|----------||
E |----------|----------||
That's pretty all, and remember that these are only the basic interval shapes, and you can find many, many more ways to play them on the fretboard, but use it to your advantage, by simplifying this, and for now, just use these that I gave you. Thanks for your attention. Practice a lot and enjoy the results. If I can ask... Jump to my Facebook profile, and gave me like! :) By Daniel Kaczmarczyk

16 comments sorted by best / new / date

comments policy
    DarthPew
    Careful there mate, a G to a B is a major third interval But good article!
    AdrianShreds97
    I thought this was going to be a lesson of an Intervals song and I clicked immediately, only to be disappointed but then interested once again.
    daveb4mv
    Picture of Aaron Marshall's (guitarist of Intervals) Ibanez in the thumbnail, well played sir, well played.
    J.Millzzzz
    i was about to say that.cx as someone that posts on UG ik that the site posts the pictures, so probably the UG guy who approved it added the picture just by looking up "guitar intervals" and didnt even realize what he was doing haha
    Sir_Taffey
    This is I find by far the best way to learn the fretboard. It makes knowing what you're doing and deciding where you want to go so easy. And once you start playing the stuff you idolised when you started guitar, you realise just how simple the concepts are. Although I understand the theory behind the obscura songs I'm learning playing them is still another story. Just saying
    bdof
    It took me YEARS to realize how to harmonize 3rd within the scale I was using. That a "3rd" is still a 3rd, even when it's a flat 3rd. I used to use my ear and just say "well, that sounds good"
    cav22s
    When I was first leanring intervals I would choose two every day ( like minor 3rd and major 6th ) play them all over the fret board and do chord progressions. After about a week intervals should be no problem. Just remember to raise everything a half step on b. I hope inversions and extended intervals are covered later.
    Theophillis
    Good. Might I suggest a third part which would detail diminished 7ths, the overriding naming conventions (flatted major=minor, flatted minor=diminished, sharped major=augmented, and the other rules for perfects), extended intervals (11th, 9th, 13th), and possibly (although more in the realms of pure theory) why a note may be called G double sharp instead of F? Good lessons. Edit: I just noticed the beginners tag on the lesson. My suggestion would only be good for intermediate upwards, I reckon!
    CurlOfTheBurl
    Guys just note that in the last diagram, that perfect fourth interval only applies to the relationship between notes on G and B, on all the other strings, the perfect fourth is DIRECTLY under the note you are playing. Just something to keep in mind
    sebediah
    the part about "perfect fifth shape" relating to the G B strings is good, but a bit confusing i think for someone who may not be familiar with the whole "shape" approach. the rest is good. as an expansion to the lesson i suggest showing diads with the interval an octave above the root note. having them so close togheter is good but there's a texture to be had by spacing intervals an octave higher, like the major third interval between A (5th string open) and C# (2nd string 2nd fret). that texture can be quite useful for anyone playing 7-8 string guitars.
    daniel.kPL
    That is a good approach, but it's a next step of learning the fretboard, and way much more advanced. Extreme useful in case of building chords.