Introduction To Blues And Country Lead Guitar

This video lesson uses a major pentatonic riff to show how you can add different techniques to your playing to create more interesting sounds. The riff incorporates string bending, hammer ons, pull offs, slides and vibrato. These are the staple techniques of lead guitar playing, and are what the majority of guitarists use when they create solos.

Introduction To Blues And Country Lead Guitar
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This video follows on from other lessons looking at how to play using string bending, hammer ons and pull offs, and string sliding, so I'm assuming you've already tried these techniques. This riff is quite short but it incorporates all the typical approaches to lead guitar playing. Those mentioned above alongside vibrato, will take your playing a long way in Blues, Country, and a whole range of other styles, and there are plenty of examples of advanced solos which are based solely around these techniques. That's the beauty of guitar playing, often the same techniques can be used effectively by both beginners and experts. So while you may feel that you're a long way from sounding like your favourite players, you're still basically using the same scales and techniques, it's just that they've had more time to get their Mojo's working! As mentioned in the video, the riff uses a C major pentatonic scale. Using major pentatonic scales gives your playing that distinctive country twang. It's quite odd since you can basically play the same riffs in both major and minor keys, even to the point of bending the same notes. The difference being that when you resolve to minor notes it usually sounds more rocky and bluesy, and more country in major keys. It's all to do with context though, and the type of music you're playing over. Guitarists such as Slash, Jimmy Page, Angus Young and even Bob Marley's lead man have regularly used major pentatonic licks on their recordings. You wouldn't describe any of these as country players so learning to play in major keys is a must for all guitarists! Part 1:
Part 2:
If you found this video useful you can view other free level 1 lessons here.

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