Palm Muting Power Chords With Accented Rhythms

This video lesson looks at accented strumming when palm muting power chords. This is great for beginners who can play 2 note power chords with basic palm muting.

Palm Muting Power Chords With Accented Rhythms
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To get the most out of this lesson it would be good to make sure you can play basic 2 note power chords. These are most often played with the root notes of the chords on strings 5 or 6. You can either play these as open power chords or as fretted power chords where you normally use fingers 1 and 3 to fret the notes. Palm muting technique isn't covered in too much detail here as there is another separate lesson on this. Post a comment underneath if you want to find out more about playing power chords or basic palm muting and I'll find the best lessons to share. The video uses an easy chord sequence so you can focus on developing the strumming hand accenting technique: E5(open) / / / G5 / / / A5 / / / G5 / / / Have fun :)

17 comments sorted by best / new / date

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    )v(egaFan90
    I learned my palm muting technique from watching Dave Mustaine. Come at me haters.
    Heideck
    You can hate Mustaine as a person but you have to reconized that he is a good, even a great guitar player
    Coda Guitar
    Glad to hear your power chord playing is immense! You into punk rock then judging by the Greenday avatar?
    motorhead911
    Why can't we all get along? I'd Like to know how Johnny Ramone does the Palm muting in the song RAMONA. It's a fantastic muted parts and unmuted parts along with other harmonics thrown in at one time. the parts I'm referring to are in between verses. Where it's C Barre down picked then the F and back. It's a slower song. Johnny Ramone is my Favorite Barre Chord player,Rhyhmn. So Dave Mustaine is good too. Steve Jones is good. Michael Schenker is good..ETC. And i'am, in love with you too, As Joe Queer is a good guitar player would say. Thank you, Ug. P.S. BARRE is not in this dictionary! Now that we can complain!
    TheSlyFooX
    I have never heard of playing a power chord like the G chord.
    Coda Guitar
    It's just an easy 2 finger power chord using the root and the 5th notes (root is G on fret 3 of the bottom E, 5th is the D note, fret 5 string 5). You can also add the octave using your little finger (high G - fret 5, string 4), but I find these 3 finger power chords are often tricky shapes for beginners, so it's often better to use 2 finger shapes at first. If your power chord playing is immense then maybe you're one of the lucky ones who never had that problem as a beginner?
    fanapathy
    Well I would ask this PM is OK. And PM gallops, I have however found something quite hard that is. Say P is PM and C is unmuted Powerchord Now the typical pattern is P-P-C, P-P-C (where the C is twice the duration) This however, at high speeds, where C is same duration P-P-C-P-P-P-C (repeat etc) is difficult, to unmute and mute really fast. Especially when muting 2 notes, or even 3note PCs with lots of muted upstrokes. If that made any sense at all. I've only recently encountered this while transcribing a lot and I have no idea how they do it with 16ths at 180bpm (4/4). Cheers
    Coda Guitar
    Hi, cheers for the comment. Sounds pretty brutal there - 16th note power chord rhythms at 180bpm! It looks like for your rhythm, the unmuted strums would be on down strokes? Counting would be 1e+a 2e+ (unmuted strums on both the + notes for each beat?). Using alternate strumming at that tempo feels like tremolo picking which is usually played on a single string (eg: pretty quick!). Are you sure that the guitar parts you're transcribing use 2 or 3 strings even for the palm muted strums? With heavy distortion and at fast speeds it could possibly sound cleaner (and be a lot easier to play), if the palm mutes were on 1 string - root only - and the unmuted strums pick out the full power chord. I've also seen some shredders say they angle their picks forward a little so it's easier to play with very fast alternate picking. I personally think you get the best tone if your pick is flat against the strings, but at fast speeds you can't hear each note very clearly so the overall effect is good with an angled pick. Finally I suppose as with anything it's best to start at a metronome tempo where you can comfortably play the guitar part, and get used to the technique involved before speeding it up. Find your top speed and keep trying to push it by a few bpm each time. I've had a word with our resident metaller and he agrees with me on this