Practices For Beginners. Part 2

This is just another bit of practices for beginning guitarists.

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First, let's talk about chords. There are MANY chords. But let's just talk about the simple ones for now. Chords are given names after letters, such as an A chord, or a G chord. Here's a list of the simple ones. (Note: can be used on electric or on acoustic.)
A chord.
|-0-|
|-2-|
|-2-|
|-2-|
|---|
|---|
B chord.
|-2-|
|-4-|
|-4-|
|-4-|
|-2-|
|---|
C chord.
|-0-|
|-1-|
|-0-|
|-2-|
|-3-|
|---|
D chord.
|-2-|
|-3-|
|-2-|
|-0-|
|---|
|---|
E chord.
|-0-|
|-0-|
|-1-|
|-2-|
|-2-|
|-0-|
F chord.
|-1-|
|-1-|
|-2-|
|-3-|
|-3-|
|-1-|
G chord.
|-1-|
|-0-|
|-0-|
|-0-|
|-2-|
|-3-|
These are the regular chords. There are different ways to play each, and there are more variations, such as A Sharp, E minor, and G sustained. It takes a while to learn them, but you can do it. If you're a country player, I would suggest focusing on the G, C, and D chords. That's what most country songs use. (And just a little side note: most songs that have chords, no matter what genre, USUALLY only have four or five chords throughout the song.) Now let's talk about some other things to practice as beginners. When I began, I worked on speed on one string, then tried working on my speed on two strings, and so on. It's a good practice if you plan to learn things like metal, because most heavy metal players tend to play as fast as they can. I'm sure you won't need an example to understand this one. (Note: can be on electric or acoustic.) Harmonics are another thing guitarist use. You know the place where your fingers when pressing down on the fretboard? Well, to do a harmonic, you put your finger on the bar instead, and hit the note. Don't hit the one above where you'd play a normal note, hit it while on the bar below, otherwise it's the wrong place. They are represented normally with a * beside the fret number on the tabliture. (Note: Can be on electric or acoustic.)
Example: Credit to From First To Last, song name "Emily"
|--------------------------------------------------------|
|---------0-----------0-----------0----------0----12*----|
|-----------0-----------0-----------0----------0------12*|
|-----5-----------5-----------4-----------5--------------|
|-3-3---3-----7-7---7-----5-5---5-----3-3---3------------|
|--------------------------------------------------------|
Now, let's talk about palm muting. Palm muting is when you play the song, but with your palm on the strings so that it doesn't really make much sound. When plugged up to an amp with distortion hooked up, it tends to sound great. Most metal players do it all the time! Mute the notes with the dots below. (Note: Can be on electric or acoustic.)
Example: This is really mainly for electric players.
|------------------------------|
|------------------------------|
|------------------------------|
|------------------------------|
|---------5---------3---------7|
|-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0|
  . . . .   . . . .   . . . .
In my first lesson I teach some tapping. As it is one of my favorite things to do, I shall give another bit about that. Tapping when you do a bunch of hammer-ons (strumming, then slaming your finger down on the fretboard to make a higher sound, without strumming the string again) and pull-offs (strumming, then pulling off the string with the finger on the fret, to a higher fret) with BOTH of your hands. The right hand parts are typically represented by a "T" on the tablitures. The following are examples, listed in order of difficulty. (Note: Mostly for Electric guitars. You can do it on acoustic, but you won't get much noise.)
|-t18p3h4p3t18-|
|--------------|
|--------------|
|--------------|  Play repeatedly.
|--------------|
|--------------|

|-t14p6h7h8p7p6-t14p6h7h8p6h7h8-|
|-------------------------------|
|-------------------------------|
|-------------------------------| Play Repeatedly.
|-------------------------------|
|-------------------------------|

|-t12p7h9p7--------|
|---------t12p7h8p7|
|------------------|
|------------------| Play repeatedly.
|------------------|
|------------------|
One last thing I'd like to cover, involves playing on on string, as fast as possible, and hammer ons and pull offs. It helps with your speed and timing, and on top of that it sounds cool. (Note: Can be played on electric or acoustic)
|-0-0-0-0-2-0-0-6-0-0-0-0-5-0-0-0-4|
|----------------------------------|
|----------------------------------|
|----------------------------------|
|----------------------------------|
|----------------------------------|
Well, that concludes it for my secong lesson. It's not anything increadible. You should be able to play it, even if your a beginner. If not, you should practice until you can. I wish you all the best of luck. If you have any questions, just comment below, and I'll try my hardest to get back to you.

12 comments sorted by best / new / date

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    krypticguitar87
    I've got a few problems with this... first off the small thing, the explination of harmonics was confusing, and I don't think I would be able to use this if I didn't know what they were.... okay the more important stuff... the Amaj chord should be e|-0-| B|-2-| G|-2-| D|-2-| A|-0-| E|---| ^this has an A in the bass what you show is A/E, which is an Amajor chord with E in the bass.... the next problem I have is your G chord. the chord you show is a G7(G dominate 7)chord, G major would be: e|-3-| B|-3-| G|-0-| D|-0-| A|-2-| E|-3-| or e|- 3-| B|-0-| G|-0-| D|-0-| A|-2-| E|-3-| also I would argue that when it comes to difficulty the open chords are much easier for a beginner to perform, meaning both the B and F chords are rather difficult, you probably should have added Emin, Amin, Dmin, Dsus2, Dsus4, Asus2, Asus4. those are all rather easy chords to play... anyway on to the final problem that hit me right away, G sustained is not a chord. you are thinking of Gsus2 or Gsus4, these are called suspended chords, they are called this because of their "floaty" feel. they lack the third so they are neither major nor minor and they sound kind of hallow. if you play these chords in order you will notice the difference between the major and minor chords vs suspended chords. Dsus4 e|-3-| B|-3-| G|-2-| D|-0-| A|---| E| ---| Dmaj e|-2-| B|-3-| G|-2-| D|-0-| A|---| E|---| Dsus2 e|-0-| B|-3-| G|-2-| D|-0-| A|---| E|---| Dmin e|-1-| B|-3-| G|-2-| D|-0-| A|---| E|---|
    AsTheWorldDies
    Dude, for the chord section, I just looked at a Basic Chord Chart my dad gave me, and the chords that the website gives you when you look at "chords" instead of "tabs". I'm not a musical genius. Though I did know how to do a G. It was a typo. I ment to put a three instead of a one.
    krypticguitar87
    Thats fine, but I wanted to point out the errors to you, and any one else new to guitar would, so nobody ends up with misinformation. It was not meant to be insulting just informative. There are many lessons on this site with bad info, there are many with good info as well just fyi, and I was hoping to help you make this one of the good ones. thats all, I think most of it iw worded nicely, with the exception of the harmonics like I explained earlier.
    krypticguitar87
    uh just a quick edit I don't know why I typed the word would here:
    Thats fine, but I wanted to point out the errors to you, and any one else new to guitar would , so nobody ends up with misinformation.
    the sentence should read
    Thats fine, but I wanted to point out the errors to you, and any one else new to guitar, so nobody ends up with misinformation.
    sorry about that!
    iamthelaw96
    good lesson...im not really a beginner...im 14 yrs old but ive been playin for 5 years...=]
    makil97
    In relation to krptics post, I dnt really understand the harmonics description. Or the tab for tapping.but otherwise, really good lesson
    AsTheWorldDies
    *PLEASE READ BEFORE RATE OR COMMENT* Here's a music book description of the three types of harmonics: Natural Harmonics-A finger lightly touches the string at the note indicated in the TAB and is plucked by the pick producing a bell-like sound called a harmonic. Please note, they are only possible on certain areas of the fretboard, such as the 12th. (Ex: -12* Artificial Harmonic-Fret the note at the first TAB number, lightly touch the string at the fret indicated in parenthesis (usually 12 frets higher then the fretted note) then pluck the string with an available finger or your pick. (Ex: -7(19) Artificial Pinch Harmonic- A note is freted as indicated in the TAB, then the picking hand produces a harmonic by squeezing he pic firmly while using the tip of the index finger in the pick attack. If parenthesis are found around the fretted note, it does not sound. No parenthesis means both the fretted note and the A.H. are heard simultaneously. (Note: Pinch harmonics sometimes have a decimal telling which kind of sound you should get)(Ex: -3.2 I figured these might be way too hard to understand, but since my description isn't that good, I hope these can help you a little.
    AsTheWorldDies
    btryan92 wrote: I didnt understand the harmonics thing at all. help?
    The deffinition from the book for the three types of harmonics are two comments above yours. And I'm sorry if mine is hard to understand. It's hard to explain harmonics. You can look them up on youtube and usually find instructional videos on how to do harmonics. I could make one if you need it.