The Beginner / Slightly-Better-Than-A-Beginner Transition. Lesson 8

author: RockstarAdam date: 04/12/2012 category: for beginners

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################# SLIDING UP AND DOWN ################# Sliding up/down is used in some songs and is therefore not a technique that a beginner would usually use (other than making "funny noises" (little brother) with it). Sliding up or down requires a note that is being played and a finger on the string on a fret. Sliding up is when you play a note on one of the lower frets (for example fret 1 2 or 3) and, while keeping that finger pressed against the fretboard, moving it upwards (closer to the body of the guitar) towards the higher frets (for example fret 5 -> upwards). ###### DROP D ###### Drop D has many uses. Basically you tune down your E string until it is D (DADGBe). This has a few purposes. It can make power chords much easier to play. For example: playing an F power chord in Drop D would be listed as 333xxx. Because since E has been lowered to D, you need to compensate by playing on a higher fret to maintain the power chord. This is easier for beginners because instead of using 3 fingers, you place one finger across all 3 strings). This can also sometimes save you from tuning down. There are a few songs where you are asked to tune a half-step down (Nirvana). But with some songs it is just because one string cannot be played because it is "below the nut". To understand, take the G power chord: 355xxx. Slide it down to F#: 244xxx. And down to F: 133xxx. And then to E: 022xxx. You cannot play Eb because the nut is in the way and basic logic states you tune a half-step down. But tune to Drop D and play 111xxx. You will be playing Eb without tuning your whole guitar. (Sorry this lesson was short, I didn't have much time)
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