Triplet Feel

Today will be a really short lesson on a basic element of music and music theory; the triplet feel. What I'm also going to do is extend past the basic triplet feels, into other, less common, feels, just to make this lesson a bit more exciting.

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Intro: Hello, and welcome to day eight of CPDmusic's lesson writing marathon! Today will be a really short lesson on a basic element of music and music theory; the triplet feel. What I'm also going to do is extend past the basic triplet feels, into other, less common, feels, just to make this lesson a bit more exciting. Enjoy! Triplet Eighth Feel: The first feel we will look at is the Triplet Eighths Feel. It is probably the most common of the bunch that we will look at, and is often referred to as swing time. What is triplet eighths feel? Well, basically, if you picked up a swing tune right now, you would see this at the top of the score:
This marking is pretty self-explanatory. It basically says that on the music, when you see an eighth note written, you wouldn't play them as a usual group of eighth notes. Instead you would play a pair of eighth notes as if it were a triplet-quarter note followed by a triplet-eighth note. So, while a piece of the music may be written like this
it is actually played like this:
Also, remember that rests act the same way. If you were to have an eighth rest on first half of beat one, and an eighth note on the second half, the rest would be played as a triplet-quarter rest, and the note played as a triplet-eighth note, and vice-versa. Triplet Sixteenth Feel: The next feel we are going to look at is the Triplet Sixteenth Feel. It is virtually the exact same as the Triplet Eighth Feel, except instead of affecting eighth notes, this one instead affects sixteenth notes. You will see it written on a piece of music like so:
This means that when you see a pair of sixteenth notes, they would actually be played as a triplet-eighth followed by a triplet-sixteenth. Therefore, if you were to see a piece of music with a Triplet Sixteenth Feel, the piece may be written like this
it would actually be played like this:
And once again, be sure to keep rests in consideration as well. Dotted Feels: Now, most musicians only refer to the above two feels, the triplet feels. But, there are two more pairs of feels that this lesson will examine; the first being the pair of Dotted Feels. There are both dotted eighth and dotted sixteenth feels, which act in a similar manner to the triplet feel. First, a dotted eighth looks like this:
It basically says for every pair of eighth notes, the first will be played like a dotted eighth note, while the second will be followed by a sixteenth note. So, if a piece of music with a dotted eighth feel to it has this line of music written
it would actually be played like this:
Dotted sixteenth feels work in a similar way, except they affect sixteenth notes instead. You would see this above a piece of music
this would tell you to play a pair of sixteenth notes as a dotted sixteenth note followed by a thirty-second note. Scottish Feels: The final pair of feels we will look at are the two Scottish Feels. There are two Scottish feels, the Scottish Eighth and the Scottish Sixteenth. They are pretty much just an inverse of the above dotted feels. For example, here is what you would see above a piece of music with a Scottish Eighth feel:
As you may notice, a pair of eighth notes with a dotted eighth feel is played as a dotted eighth note followed by a sixteen note, while a pair of eighth notes with a Scottish eighth feel is played as a sixteenth note followed by a dotted eighth note. Therefore, a bar of music with a Scottish eighth feel may be written like this
but it will actually be played like this:
Scottish sixteenth are also the same, but instead affect sixteenth notes. You would see this above a piece of music:
This would tell you that a pair of sixteenth notes would be played as a thirty-second note followed by a dotted sixteenth note. Outro: Well, that's it for todayreally shortlesson on musical feels. Hopefully you learned something new you can implement into your own composition! Anyway, that's all for today, sogoodbye! Support CPDmusic's Lesson Writing Marathon By Joining This Group

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13 comments sorted by best / new / date

    Echoplex
    Examples would make this a hell of a lot easier for beginners to understand. I wouldn't have gotten it if I didn't know this already.
    hildesaw
    While this is good, I think audio examples would be great for people who don't necessarily understand what you're saying.
    CBannerman
    If you didn't understand a word, it's because of your own music theory skills. It's perfectly clear.
    tntero
    CBannerman wrote: If you didn't understand a word, it's because of your own music theory skills. It's perfectly clear.
    that maybe right, but perhaps if you can understand it its because you have enough music theory knowledge to not need this tutorial, when you write here, you should right for the dumb people, cause if the dumb people understand you, so will all the others
    krypticguitar87
    I agree that thier should be some audio examples, only because it makes learning the beats a little easier.... not everyone can hear these things in thier head, especially if this is one of thier first times being exposed to this type of sound.... overall I enjoyed the lesson, but I'm not sure that everyone can understand what each beat should sound like....
    CBannerman
    I think tntero has a point and I revise my comment. Audio examples would probably be good. This is quite a lot for a beginner to take on paper.
    mh1986
    The only people who will understand this are people whom already understand this if that makes sense. I already knew all of this so its pretty straightforward to me, but a beginner would probably be more confused after this than before. Write with beginners in mind and everyone else of varying advancement will follow along just fine as well.
    omegamuff1n
    Yeah, audio examples would really make my day. i'm one of those people that likes to pick up the guitar and **** around and see what sounds good; i'm hardly ever concerned about the actual nitty gritty theory of music, and therefore i never really took the time to learn it.
    cargath
    I don't get it. I mean, i do understand what it does, but not why. What's wrong with just writing down the notes the way they are supposed to be played?
    mr.speaker
    tntero wrote: CBannerman wrote: If you didn't understand a word, it's because of your own music theory skills. It's perfectly clear. that maybe right, but perhaps if you can understand it its because you have enough music theory knowledge to not need this tutorial, when you write here, you should right for the dumb people, cause if the dumb people understand you, so will all the others
    I agree. Well said too
    KingHenrik1967
    mr.speaker wrote: tntero wrote: CBannerman wrote: If you didn't understand a word, it's because of your own music theory skills. It's perfectly clear. that maybe right, but perhaps if you can understand it its because you have enough music theory knowledge to not need this tutorial, when you write here, you should right for the dumb people, cause if the dumb people understand you, so will all the others I agree. Well said too
    Anyone else notice the irony of him calling other people dumb, yet he is unable to use the word 'right' in context. Hmmm. Good lesson though.
    Tyler_Taco94
    I See And Notice The Difference How The Musics Written Compared To How It's Actually Played In The Triplet Eighth Feel But In Order To Fully Grasp It I Need To Hear The Difference