Js Bach Canon Sweeping

Welcome for this sweeping lesson. Inspired by J.S Bach, The mini canon is my adaptation of the famous chords progression. If you are a new comer with sweeping technique this is the right lesson because it's melodic, sounds great at any speed and also because it's a classic so you have to know it!

7
Link for the Tablature. On each chord goes a 16th triplet's group of notes. Each group of 16th note is the very arpeggio taken from the chord. So you find the same notes. Everything is played over 5 strings.

What Is An Arpeggio?

An arpeggio is the notes of a chord played separately (one after each other). For example: you can play a chord with open strings and let ring each note or chose to fret each note on a different place on the fingerboard.

What Is sweeping?

Sweeping is a technique where you pick each string downstroke for ascending and upstroke for descending. Once mastered, this technique allows to play quite fast. Notice that it is important to play each note separately then. The 1st note must stop rigging when the 2nd note starts and so on.That's why it's difficult at beginning. It's a matter of synchronisation between the pick and the left hand (fingerboard hand). So I advice to practice palm mute at the beginning by muting the strings at the bridge with your right hand's palm so that the sound of each note keep under control.
           E                    B                 C#m              G#m
      0 2 2 1 0 0          x 2 4 4 4 x        x 4 6 6 5 4       4 6 6 4 4 4

           A
      5 7 7 6 5 5

    E                 B                 C#m               G#m
   4/4
    Gtr II
     Q                 Q                 Q                 Q
     |                 |                 |                 |
     /                 /                 /                 /

    Gtr I
     |------6-------|  |------6-------|  |------6-------|  |------6-------|
     S  S  S  S  S  S  S  S  S  S  S  S  S  S  S  S  S  S  S  S  S  S  S  S
||--19p16----------------------------14-16p12----------------------------11-|
||o-------17----------------------16----------14----------------------12----|
||-----------16----------------16----------------13----------------13-------|
||--------------18----------16----------------------14----------13----------|
||o----------------19-14h18----------------------------16-11h14-------------|
||--------------------------------------------------------------------------|

  A               E            A               B
   Q              Q             Q               Q
   |              |             |               |
   /              /             /               /

   |-----6------| |----6-----|  |-----6------|  |------6-------|
   S S  S S  S  S S  S S S S S  S S  S S  S  S  S  S  S  S  S  S
|-12p9-----------------------7-12p9------------------------11-14--||
|------10------------------9--------10------------------12-------o||
|---------9--------------9-------------9-------------11-----------||
|-----------11---------9-----------------11-------13--------------||
|--------------12-7h11----------------------12S14----------------o||
|-----------------------------------------------------------------||

The Mini Canon

Those arpeggios here are made of 3 sounds or notes. Major(1st-3rd-5th) and Minor (1st-3rd minor-5th). Basically you have to learn one position for the minor and one position for the major to be abble to play it. What I find interesting in this exercise is that it uses different posibilities of fingerings. Lets scheddule those 2 bars in 8 sections (1section/chord). [2majors, 2 minors, 4 majors] with 4 differents arpeggios positions. Those 4 positions are the most overknown positions in Shred style simply because they are the easiest ( or less challenging) to play and are very used in neo-classical music. There a countless variations possibles then but (IMO) it's good to start with those ones. 1- E (major) upstroke and pull-off, upstroke, upstroke, upstroke, upstroke. 2- B (major) Downstroke and hammer on, downstroke, downstroke, downstroke, downstroke /!\On fret 16th (D/G/B strings) play with the lefthand 2nd finger. Its difficult to play notes separately then. 3- C# (minor) upstroke and pull-off, upstroke, upstroke, upstroke, upstroke. 4- G# (minor) Downstroke and hammer on, downstroke, downstroke, downstroke, downstroke /!\ On fret 14th (G/B strings) play with 3rd finger. 5- A (major) same than for the first E section but starts on the 12th fret. 6- E (major) same than for B section but starts on the 7th fret. 7- A (major) same than for the first E section but starts on the 12th fret. 8- B (major) same than for the first E section but starts on the 14th fret. Memorize all the notes and practice very, very slowly at beginning. Then practice with metronome at slow speed. Remember to play 6 notes/beat for 16th triplets. Don't mistaken playing fast and rushing notes. You must hear each single note, not only the first and the last. Practice with crunch or clean sound at beginning. I hope you like this lesson. I want to thank this great website for hosting this free lesson. Don't forget to bookmark my web site! Roo has released and instructional DVD available at www.rooguitar.com

18 comments sorted by best / new / date

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    rooguitar
    My mistake, I meant Johann Pachelbel's Canon. And yes Bach wrote some Canons and Fugues. Anyway I should have wrote "inspired by" Pachelbel's Canon because this is just some guitar arpeggios not a cover at all... Any clue how I can update this ? thx
    rtheim
    I always thought the same thing about the word "canon". Not sure of the exact textbook definition but I know that canons have a repeated motive (usually melodic) that can work either coincidingly or completely independent from each other in the song. For example, "Row row row your boat" is a canon.
    Riser
    demoniacfashion : Pachelbel wasn't the only one to write in canon; there's not THE Canon. Canon is a style of writing in which the same phrase is used again and agian, sometimes with small variations, sometimes not. For example, a canon maight have the following chord progression C G Am Em C Dm Bo G C C G Am Em C Dm Bo G C C G Am EM C Dm Bo G C...
    In Pachelbel's, its actually D,A,B,F#,G,D,G,A.
    Aikoj
    Riser wrote: demoniacfashion : Pachelbel wasn't the only one to write in canon; there's not THE Canon. Canon is a style of writing in which the same phrase is used again and agian, sometimes with small variations, sometimes not. For example, a canon maight have the following chord progression C G Am Em C Dm Bo G C C G Am Em C Dm Bo G C C G Am EM C Dm Bo G C... In Pachelbel's, its actually D,A,B,F#,G,D,G,A.
    When did he say that was Pachelbel's? o_o But anyways, this is a good lesson. I've played for the longest time and have always pushed back sweeping, thinking I'm not ready, ever since I started, I think I was ready a long time ago and I just need a decent guide now... This is a great one.
    demoniacfashion
    Pachelbel wasn't the only one to write in canon; there's not THE Canon. Canon is a style of writing in which the same phrase is used again and agian, sometimes with small variations, sometimes not. For example, a canon maight have the following chord progression C G Am Em C Dm Bo G C C G Am Em C Dm Bo G C C G Am EM C Dm Bo G C...
    R.Christie
    Why is the word "canon" used? Can't see this has anything to do with the musical term "canon".