Warming Up: Killing Two Birds With One Stone Exercise

In this lesson, I will show you a simple way to use some basic warm up exercises to combine them together to create a new whole exercise that will super charge your warming up.

Warming Up: Killing Two Birds With One Stone Exercise
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There are a ton of warm up exercises out there, each exercise designed for their specific usages and objectives. In this lesson, I will show you a simple way to use some basic warm up exercises to combine them together to create a new whole exercise. This will super charge your warming up combining all of the advantages from each of exercises as well as developing other aspects of your playing skill simultaneously. Example 1 is the traditional exercise of warming up by taking the chromatic scale and playing it four notes per string with linear fingering in chronological order back and forth. This exercise is good for getting your fingers in shape especially playing on the lower frets of the guitar neck which require greater strength on your left hand than playing on the higher frets. In addition, this exercise will help your ears to be familiar with the sound of the chromatic scale as well. Ex.1
Example 2 is one great finger exercise from Steve Vai. The concept of this exercise is very similar to the first example by playing four notes per string pattern with the chromatic scale, but this time play it in a non chronological order. This is great for practicing independent fingering and two hand synchronization at the same time. Ex.2
Example 3 is a great speed and accuracy exercise from John Petrucci. This will not only help you to develop speed and accuracy, but also the articulation of your picking. Ex.3
Example 4 this takes the three previous examples and combines them together to create another exercise which will integrate all of the advantages into one new warm up exercise. Notice that the first three measures are taken from Ex.1 and measures 4-6 are taken from Ex.2 but the starting point has now moved to the third fret of the 6th string. Measures 7-10 are taken from the Ex.3, and in measures 11-19 are the extensions of the Ex.3. This exercise will not only help your fingers warm up, but will also help you to develop your ears, fingerings, picking technique, speed, accuracy and your two hand synchronization at the same time. Ex.4
*Note: fingerings are written above music notations This is just one of several ways that you can use to warm up your fingers while practicing other aspects of your guitar playing. I encourage you to use your existing warm up exercises and combine these. The key is to adapt and tailor your exercises for your own personal development. This method saves a lot of time and provides you with the ability to practice multiple exercises in one. Just like killing two birds with one stone. Check out the video below to see and hear them in action! Keep On Rocking those six strings!
If you would like to download all the tabs from the article in better quality here is the link to download the zip file. By Poh Jindawech

13 comments sorted by best / new / date

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    Woffelz
    Don't forget scales too. Same idea, but you're more likely to use scales.
    AWPtic
    This is probably my favorite warmup exercise yet! It's so much fun! I do think that the second exercise should be more incorporated into the final exercise though!
    rockinsane6
    Hello, do you have a guitar pro tab for this? thanks
    Poh Jindawech
    Sorry, I tried to look but it seems like i already deleted the files! you can have a look at the tabs and put them on the guitar pro
    gh0ul666
    well its exactly the same as the 30 hr workout warmups, copied 1 to 1, same font, same size etc. (ego level: asian?)
    Poh Jindawech
    Hey, I just want to ensure that you understand the core of this article, the key is to take those warm up exercises that you have or even your owns to merge and adapt them together for your personal development. These examples are just one way of doing it, and I used these because they're well known exercises from great players so you guys can easily have an idea of what this article's talking about. That's why I stated the names of the creators of each exercises. I never intended to copy or claim that they are mine. It would be stupid and non sense to even think about copying or stealing people's stuff especially from people that I really admire and highly respect who are my idols. Asian, White, Black what those have to do with when it comes down to music. It's a freaking universal language Man! Anyway, thanks for your feedback