Metalcore Rythm Riffing

I'm gonna give you some examples to help you improve your rythm chops, and some riffing/filling skills. This is not only applied to Metalcore, but it is most often used here.

1

Introduction

Alrighty! This is my first lesson, so try not to be too hard on me now. I'm gonna give you some examples to help you improve your rythm chops, and some riffing/filling skills. This is not only applied to Metalcore, but it is most often used here. (Examples in Drop D)

Pt.1- The Rythm

Okay, the first thing you need is to have really tight rythm chops. To achieve this, its a good idea to practice triplets and gallops. NOTE: These are not great ways to apply these chords, they are simply to get your wrist in a tighter motion. Fig.1- Triplets Heres a simple exercise using D minor on the low D string. NOTE: Play these next 2 palm muted.
e|-------------------------------------------------------------------------|
B|-------------------------------------------------------------------------|
G|-------------------------------------------------------------------------|
D|-------------------------------------------------------------------------|
A|--000--000--222--000--333--000--555--000--777--000--888--000--101010--000|
D|--000--000--222--000--333--000--555--000--777--000--888--000--101010--000|
 PM|_______________________________________________________________________
e|-------------------------------------------------------------------------|
B|-------------------------------------------------------------------------|
G|-------------------------------------------------------------------------|
D|-------------------------------------------------------------------------|
A|--121212--12\------------------------------------------------------------|
D|--121212--12\------------------------------------------------------------|
  PM|_____
Fig.2- Gallops Gallops are a little trickier to get the hang of, but they are definately a cooler sound if used right. It's kinda like a "Chug-chugga-chug" sound if you do it right.
e|-------------------------------------------------------------------------|
B|-------------------------------------------------------------------------|
G|-------------------------------------------------------------------------|
D|-------------------------------------------------------------------------|
A|-0-00--3-33--0-00--0-00--5-55--0-00--0-00--12-1212--10-1010--5\----------|
D|-0-00--3-33--0-00--0-00--5-55--0-00--0-00--12-1212--10-1010--5\----------|
 PM|_________________________________________________________
Example: Six - All That Remains. This is the verse to Six, by All That Reamins. Using triplets, and eighth notes. This is including the riffs between the changes. NOTE: Repeat each part once.
e|-----------------------------------|-------------------------------------|
B|-----------------------------------|-------------------------------------|
G|-----------------------------------|-------------------------------------|
D|------------------------------5---7|33-333--33--333--33--333----2---3----|
A|-00--000--00--000--00--000--0---0--|11-111--11--111--11--111--1---1------|
D|-00--000--00--000--00--000---------|-------------------------------------|
 PM|________________________         PM|______________________

Pt.2 Writing Rythms And Adding Riffs

You can use any rythm you want, but its good to use tight rythms, and you have to stay in key. If you a little more musically inept, I liike to use my Phrygian chords, as well as my minor chords, but here is a simple rythm.
e|---------------------------------------------R--------------------------|
B|---------------------------------------------E--------------------------|
G|---------------------------------------------A--------------------------|
D|---------------------------------------------P--------------------------|
A|-15--000---5\3--000-3------------0-00--------E--------------------------|
D|-15--000---5\3--000-3------------0-00--------A--------------------------| 
     PM|__     PM|___ F                        T
Play the rythm with a pause after the F chord until you get the hang of the feel. Then throw a little D minor riff in the middle, like so.
e|---------------------------------------------R--------------------------|
B|---------------------------------------------E--------------------------|
G|---------------------------------------------A--------------------------|
D|---------------------------------------------P--------------------------|
A|-15--000---5\3--000-3-----5--8p7-0000--------E--------------------------|
D|-15--000---5\3--000-3--0---------0000--------A--------------------------| 
     PM|__     PM|___ F                        T
Simple little riffs like this is what builds the exciting parts of most Metalcore verses, and/or Choruses. Remember that Its a good idea to stay in key, otherwise your riffs will ruin the entire progression.

A Final Word

Another thing you could do is add a harmony to the riff. Just play the same notes a 3rd, 5th or octave up. (This usually works better with a friend, and another guitar) Sorry about the modest lesson, but I look forward to some feedback. Thanks.

23 comments sorted by best / new / date

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    --ATREYUROCK--
    First I like it, you've covered sum good basics I really is too short tho, defo needs sum more
    mt666
    doesn't explain a whole lot. And your example of six by all that remains isn't even close to how it's actually played.
    xXxA7X~Fan07xXx
    Bore. Re-do the entire lesson and look up more history on metalcore. When its rhythm they like to keep in the upper frets like above 12 or so plus you should do some breakdown examples too and more lead stuff as well.
    killdeth44
    if you are wondering about my credibility, i was the guitarist for the 1st marine division band for 3 years. i attended the arm forces school of music. its not much but it helped me improve my playing and understanding of music a lot.
    killdeth44
    what you hear in these metal core songs, or any metal, are not triplets. the figure you hear is two 16th notes followed by an eighth note. Triplets are 3 consecutive eighth notes bracketed with a 3 over them. the two figures are played completely different. the 2-16th eighth figure is played with more room left in the beat to play more. it sounds like three 16th notes followed by a 16th rest. triplets are played like three 8th notes that play through the beat. which sounds like 3 notes in one beat with no room left for more notes. listen to a song that is wrote in 6/8 or 9/8 or 12/8 and you will see what i am talking about. a good example would be trivium's detonation.
    xXxA7X~Fan07xXx
    @Smiling. Not really lead stuff, but single string kinda riffs. Not sure how to word it. This would help alot of rhythm players such as myself though. I play rhythm metalcore guitar to. I like to mix power chords with single string riffs and breakdowns. Would be nice if he could do an edit and show some breakdown examples though.
    SmilingVengence
    xXxA7X~Fan07xXx wrote: Bore. Re-do the entire lesson and look up more history on metalcore. When its rhythm they like to keep in the upper frets like above 12 or so plus you should do some breakdown examples too and more lead stuff as well.
    Why would he do more lead stuff if it's a 'rythm'lesson?
    Zao_89
    I hate explaining this to people, but a sixteenth-sixteenth-eigth pattern is not a triplet. In a triplet, the three notes are held for the same time. The "triplet" you describe is just a reverse gallop.
    gothic_saint
    good thing but ya heck it was too short just the rythm parts and i think a little more ellaboration on harmonising could help a lot of newbie guitarists out there
    WillJMW
    Good, but short. I'ma bassist and even I found it pretty helpful.