Metal Rhythm. Part 2

This article explains several things about note lenghts, and how to apply them into metal rhythm.

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This article explains several things about note lenghts, and how to apply them into metal rhythm. The basic thing you should have in mind while building rhythm chops while exploring note lenghts is the beat. Everything rhythmic should stick to the beat. Try just counting aloud: 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 & 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 &... While you do that, try imagining a riff you could play on that beat, and have the note on each beat. After you that for awhile, let the metronome take the counting role. I suggest you start with 50 bpms. But you have to soak the beat. It is essential for what we'll do next. The carnatic syllabic counting system Each note you play is (or at least should be) countable. There is a carnatic syllabic counting system, that helps you count what you play. Instead of numbers, you use syllables. If you play quarter notes (a note on each beat), you get to count them as 'Ta'. You count eight notes as 'Ta ka'. Triplets (3 notes per beat) as 'Ta ki ta'. Just pronounce those syllables several times without stopping, and you'll get the picture. You'll hear those note lenghts very often. They usually form groovy and strong riffs. Sixteenth notes (4 notes per beat) as 'Ta ka di mi'. They are usually forming fast riffs, but if you organize the drums in the way that they play in quarter notes, you can get pretty nasty grooves. Kvintoli (5 notes per beat) as 'Ta di gi na ka'. Those are quite unusual, and may be easily misinterpreted as eights in 5/8 measure. It may take some practice to get them in your ears and fingers, but they're worth it! They can be also subdivided (as all the others can be), for the sake of accentuation. You can look at them as 3 + 2 groove, so you count them as 'Ta ki ta na ka'. You will notice the difference if you count aloud. 'Ta di gi na ka' will probably carry you to 2 + 3 counting, though it's all in your head. What you hear inside, that will come out. Sixtoli (6 notes per beat) may be a sequence of two 'Ta ki ta' counts 'Ta ki ta Ta ki ta'. It may seem like the same thing, but you have to keep your ears on the flow of pronounciation of sixtolis, because they musn't sound like sequence of two triplets. Septoli (7 notes per beat) have various options on how are they counted. 'Ta ki ta ta ka di mi', which stands for 3 + 4, and 'Ta ka di mi ta ki ta', which stands for 4 + 3 are easiest ones to overcome. Be sure to practice all of those along with metronome. When you overcome each individually, combine them! See which one go well one after another. There are countless options available. Accentuation It is very important to accentuate the subdivision of n-tolis properly. You can do that in several ways.
  • 1. Use downpicking on beginning of new subdivision. But this won't be that effective unless you have a downpick on last note of previous subdivision. Here is an example:
  • 2. Use harmonic difference on beginning of new subdivision. Meaning, if you have only one note through whole riff, add a power chord, or other type of chord, at beginning of subdivision. If you have all chords, use only one note.
  • 3. Use rest instead of second note of new subdivision.
  • 4. Make drum accentuate the new subdivision. This is more songwriting tip, but it helps a lot, especially if you're working on odd rhythms with a drummer. It's worth having this in mind.
  • 5. Change melodic pattern on new subdivision. If you have a riff based around one note, you can add a melodic pattern to it with other notes. And opposite, of course. Implement various scales and modes. The more you seek, the more you'll get. Never stop exploring. This should be only a hint of what you can do with counting. And get in the feeling. If you really feel the groove, you will more easily transfer it into music you're making. Official Josip Pesut site Enjoy playing Josip's 'Licks of the month'! Subscribe to newsletter to get free guitar lessons, notices about new videos and many other bonuses! Thanks For Your Support!
  • 24 comments sorted by best / new / date

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      axe_man
      This should help with tabbing ideas i have up, sometimes its a right pain to get the riff to fit in the time signature. I will know it's 4/4 becuase i worked with it on a metronome and then end up tieing every note to a 64th note or something. thanks, for this, didn't realise it went further than triplets
      J.A.M
      G.9 wrote: ElBarto2811 wrote: Septuplets? Name one song that uses them... I believe Nevermore's "Enemies of Reality" has 11tuplets.
      The correct term is actually "nondecatuplets" Paul Gilbert did a video on them years ago.
      G.9
      ElBarto2811 wrote: Septuplets? Name one song that uses them...
      I believe Nevermore's "Enemies of Reality" has 11tuplets.
      Intricacy13
      You make it sound like downpicked riffs are more legit than alternate picked ones. Thats bs. There are definite limits to downpicking. You simply cannot play certain metal riffs with downpicking, and really its not a matter of being technical or not, its just how the song is. Such as most thrash and death metal riffs.
      it's actually pretty easy to down pick very fast, just practice As for the tricky rhythms.. nice. a mix of 2 and 3 pedal notes in between chords is fun to master and show off ;D. btw, the V is an upstroke, the other is a downstroke. good lesson overall, but since it's metal, i would down pick it all 8D
      silversoulcage
      Pannenkoeken wrote: Nilpferdkoenig wrote: Rockdaparty44 wrote: 1. Use downpicking on beginning of new subdivision. But this won't be that effective unless you have a downpick on last note of previous subdivision. Here is an example: I get it but in your example you wrote an upstroke for the first note of the first subdivision of 7 notes. Or am I missing something? I find this a very misguiding thing to say, especially in metal. You just simply won't be able to downpick that note if you're playing a fast type of metal, it will just be too fast. I don't know about that; one can down pick surprisingly quickly. Plus it makes for a cool effect, which, imo, is more important than speed. Quality of sound > Technicality That being said, good lesson.
      I think what you mean too say is that whats going on in the song and phrasing is more important that "technicality", technical ability. Quality of sound would refer to a recorded piece and it's quality. These lessons really IMO aren't that great. But whatever, good read and somewhat helpful.
      diefordethklok
      silversoulcage wrote: Pannenkoeken wrote: Nilpferdkoenig wrote: Rockdaparty44 wrote: 1. Use downpicking on beginning of new subdivision. But this won't be that effective unless you have a downpick on last note of previous subdivision. Here is an example: I get it but in your example you wrote an upstroke for the first note of the first subdivision of 7 notes. Or am I missing something? I find this a very misguiding thing to say, especially in metal. You just simply won't be able to downpick that note if you're playing a fast type of metal, it will just be too fast. I don't know about that; one can down pick surprisingly quickly. Plus it makes for a cool effect, which, imo, is more important than speed. Quality of sound > Technicality That being said, good lesson. I think what you mean too say is that whats going on in the song and phrasing is more important that "technicality", technical ability. Quality of sound would refer to a recorded piece and it's quality. These lessons really IMO aren't that great. But whatever, good read and somewhat helpful.
      Quality of sound can be the accent of your note. For example, Paul Gilbert likes to start a lot of his shred based riffs with an up stroke, to accent it, and to make the riff sound a bit more tense. That's quality, for sure.
      jammyninja
      Is it me or does the "Ta ki" method sounds like how Pickles explains polyrhythms to Nathan Explosion on Metalocalypse? Good lesson!
      link no1
      KoRnogra4 wrote: ElBarto2811 wrote: Septuplets? Name one song that uses them... Don't Stop Believing by Journey when the guitar comes in.
      totaly metal
      corrda00
      jammyninja wrote: Is it me or does the "Ta ki" method sounds like how Pickles explains polyrhythms to Nathan Explosion on Metalocalypse? Good lesson!
      ^+1
      KoRnogra4
      ElBarto2811 wrote: Septuplets? Name one song that uses them...
      Don't Stop Believing by Journey when the guitar comes in.
      fysix
      Rockdaparty44 wrote: 1. Use downpicking on beginning of new subdivision. But this won't be that effective unless you have a downpick on last note of previous subdivision. Here is an example: I get it but in your example you wrote an upstroke for the first note of the first subdivision of 7 notes. Or am I missing something?
      he must've inverted it as your hand is picking..making V be 'down'
      Rockdaparty44
      1. Use downpicking on beginning of new subdivision. But this won't be that effective unless you have a downpick on last note of previous subdivision. Here is an example:
      I get it but in your example you wrote an upstroke for the first note of the first subdivision of 7 notes. Or am I missing something?
      chrisweyers
      Cool, dude! I'll have to try that out later! I can definitely see how those syllables are better than numbers, they're far less cumbersome. It's kind of like solfeggio for rhythm.
      Nilpferdkoenig
      Rockdaparty44 wrote: 1. Use downpicking on beginning of new subdivision. But this won't be that effective unless you have a downpick on last note of previous subdivision. Here is an example: I get it but in your example you wrote an upstroke for the first note of the first subdivision of 7 notes. Or am I missing something?
      I find this a very misguiding thing to say, especially in metal. You just simply won't be able to downpick that note if you're playing a fast type of metal, it will just be too fast.
      Night_Lights
      I don't know about that; one can down pick surprisingly quickly. Plus it makes for a cool effect, which, imo, is more important than speed. Quality of sound > Technicality That being said, good lesson.
      You make it sound like downpicked riffs are more legit than alternate picked ones. Thats bs. There are definite limits to downpicking. You simply cannot play certain metal riffs with downpicking, and really its not a matter of being technical or not, its just how the song is. Such as most thrash and death metal riffs.
      Pannenkoeken
      Nilpferdkoenig wrote: Rockdaparty44 wrote: 1. Use downpicking on beginning of new subdivision. But this won't be that effective unless you have a downpick on last note of previous subdivision. Here is an example: I get it but in your example you wrote an upstroke for the first note of the first subdivision of 7 notes. Or am I missing something? I find this a very misguiding thing to say, especially in metal. You just simply won't be able to downpick that note if you're playing a fast type of metal, it will just be too fast.
      I don't know about that; one can down pick surprisingly quickly. Plus it makes for a cool effect, which, imo, is more important than speed. Quality of sound > Technicality That being said, good lesson.
      thecrusher1234!
      Ha I was actually just watching a video by shawn lane where he talks about using the "ta ka di mi" stuff! awesome lesson