Phrasing With Multiple Modes

How the modes of; Dorian, Ionian, Lydian, and Mixolydian can be combined to blend melodic ideas across chord progressions.

Phrasing With Multiple Modes
4
In this lesson we discuss how to phrase melody lines over progressions that will leave the key center to include the use of multiple modes.

Modes are often thought of as being used within a single harmonic situation, such as in a, "modal progression." However, when modes are used in more complex musical styles such as; jazz, classical, or in perhaps a progressive rock situation, (to cover more than one harmonic idea), things can get slightly more complicated.

The studies outlined in this lesson will run through how the modes of; Dorian, Ionian, Lydian, and Mixolydian can be combined to blend a melodic idea across a chord progression that flows through more than one mode within a group of chord changes. To effectively do this students must be aware of the intervals found in each mode and how the differences between each mode will affect the chord harmonies under the melodies.

If you have any difficulty following this lesson, please review your basic major and relative minor scales, key signatures and modal theory.

The video Lesson:

About the Author:
Andrew Wasson is a 1992 Graduate of Hollywood California's Guitar Institute of Technology (G.I.T.). He has operated his Canadian Music School; Creative Guitar Studio, for the last 20+ years teaching thousands of guitarists both in studio sessions, and through his popular YouTube Channels, Skype lessons and websites.

12 comments sorted by best / new / date

comments policy
    AlanHB
    Over the chord progression Em-A Bb A-Bm you say to use E dorian over the Em-A, Bb lydian over the Bb and D major over the A-Bm. As you state, the notes of E dorian are shared by D major (same key signature). If they have the same notes why are you referring to D major at all? It's just E dorian.
    RabidPikachu
    Bb lydian and E dorian are different. So no, it wouldn't just be E dorian. And it's easier to say E dorian and D major, even though they are one in the same, because instead of your root note being D when playing over the Em-A, the root note would be E. So while they are the same, referring to them by two different names makes sense.
    AlanHB
    The root note is E for all the scales - he says the progression in in E dorian.
    Panasonic3
    The entire chord progression has a feel and each moment or chord inside the progression has its own feel, making the need to differentiate and isolate each modal moment.
    AlanHB
    Would you say that the part that goes A - Bm is a Modal moment in D major?
    AlanHB
    Would you say that the part that goes A - Bm is a Modal moment in D major?
    AlanHB
    Would you say that the part that goes A - Bm is a Modal moment in D major?
    Panasonic3
    D major is also known as D Ionian. It has the exact same notes as E Dorian. They are different because they gravitate around different tonic centers.
    AlanHB
    The tonic of the entire progression is E, anf if you want to employ CST, what makes the run at the end gravitate towards D?
    Panasonic3
    This guy is very smart, clear and concise. I wish he was in my area for lessonsssss!!
    RabidPikachu
    A good example of this would be the solo in Protest the Hero's "Blindfolds Aside." He touches on like 3 different scales depending on what chords he's playing over. Pretty cool. Adds a lot of feel to it. I try and explain stuff like this to my friends and they just stare at me and drool. Lol.