For Those About to Shred: Major Scale Practice Routine

MotivationApproaching the same concept (in this case, a scale) from different perspectives can be both challenging and rewarding. The aim of this lesson is to show you different ways to practice the major scale, which will result in a better knowledge of the fretboard.

logo
Ultimate Guitar
For Those About to Shred: Major Scale Practice Routine
0

Motivation

Approaching the same concept (in this case, a scale) from different perspectives can be both challenging and rewarding. The aim of this lesson is to show you different ways to practice the major scale, which will result in a better knowledge of the fretboard. It can also help you develop speed and overall technique. I have included a tab for people to download and use as a reference.

YouTube preview picture

The theory

As you probably know by now, any scale exists all over the fretboard, as the intervals that it is based on can be found across all strings. The idea behind this workout is that you can take those intervals and organize them in ways that can allow you to play the scale in a fluid manner. In the video you can see the same scale played across different positions, but also played in intervals (thirds, fifths, sixths and octaves) and even on one single string. There is also a shred-y idea at the end that can help you build technique. All the examples employ the C major scale but you can and should transpose the patterns so as to explore different major scales.

Outro

I personally don’t believe there is such thing as “mastering” a scale (or anything on the guitar), as there are always new combinations and patterns you can encounter, and which will prove challenging. The ideas shown to you in the video are not exactly meant to be played fast but after enough practice, they can be performed at a fast pace and become part of your lick library/trickbag.

Rock on,

Miguel


0 comments sorted by best / new / date