Integrating Alternate-Picked Arpeggios Into Your Solos

In this lesson, we will go through some arpeggio-based ideas that you can start incorporating into your playing, regardless of the genre you like to play the most.

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Ultimate Guitar
Integrating Alternate-Picked Arpeggios Into Your Solos
8

Hey,

In this lesson we will go through some arpeggio-based ideas that you can start incorporating into your playing, regardless of the genre you like to play the most.

In this video I demonstrate the licks provided to you in this article.

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Motivation

Suppose you’re at a jam session or playing along to a backing track in the key of D minor. Perhaps you will resort to playing a lick that sounds like this:

But today we want to go beyond that and go for a sound that is more elegant, if you will. Check out the idea below. It is certainly more challenging for both hands, but it certainly sounds more interesting than what was played before.

Here is another idea, which you may combine with the aforementioned ones:

One of my favourite arpeggio shapes to use looks like this. The cool thing about this shape is that merely shifting the position of one finger results in a more interesting arpeggio. If, for example, you replace that D on the high E string (10th) fret with a C, you'd already have the shape for a Dm7 arpeggio. Replacing it with a C# would result in an enigmatic-sounding DmM7.

This principle of "shifting" is used in this other idea, which I also demonstrate on the video linked above. It's quite challenging if played with alternate-picking, so don't shy away from including it in your practice routine.

 

Closure

Give the examples a go and figure out what fingerings work the best for you. Generally I dislike providing tabs because the way I tab things out might not suit everyone. Either way, any of the shapes shown will definitely fit not only the D minor chord and any of its extensions (Dm11, for example), but they can yield interesting results when played on top of other chords that belong to the same key. Have a friend play G minor for you and then play any of the shapes and/or ideas shown above. I'm sure you'll be inspired by the results.

It is likely that those interested in the boring music genre known as “shred” have gone on a quest to gather as many arpeggio shapes as possible. Here’s a better idea that will result in less time and money consumed: simply figure out on your own different ways to play the same chord. Once you know which notes make up any given chord, all you need to do is figure out ways to organize them across the fretboard in ways that make sense to you.

I hope you liked this lesson. Feel free to subscribe to my channel on YT :)




 

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