Stuck In One Pentatonic Shape: Here Is A Solution

This lesson will teach you the secret to soloing all over the fretboard, without hitting an unwanted note. I notice many guitarists when playing a solo they usually are constrained in one pentatonic scale, however just one scale can rid you of that problem.

logo
Ultimate Guitar
0
First off the scale we are going to use is called the extended scale. It sounds great and is amazing for blues rock, classic rock, and even metal. So: The Extended Scale
E---------------------------8-10-8--------------------------
B----------------------8-10--------10-8---------------------
G----------------5-7/9-----------------9\7-5----------------
D-------------5-7----------------------------7-5------------
A-------3-5/7------------------------------------7\5-3------
E-0-3-5------------------------------------------------5-3--
What sounds even cooler is when you get down to the high E string you slide or bend the 10 fret to the 12 fret. For Example:
E---8-10-12
B----------
G----------
D----------
A----------
E----------
I will show you a few examples of a solo I made up with this scale.
E-------------------------------------------------5-------------------------
B------------------------------------------------5--5h8p5-5----------8/10---
G----------------------------------7------5-7-9\7--------7-7-----5-7--------
D------------------------------5h7-----------------------------7------------
A--------3-5-3h5p3----------3/7---------------------------------------------
E---0-3-5---------5-3h5----5------------------------------------------------
E--10----8------------------------------------------------------------------
B-----------8-10------------------------------------------------------------
G---------------------------------------------------------------------------
D---------------------------------------------------------------------------
A-------------------------3H5P3H5P3-3---------------------------------------
E--------------------0-3-5-----------3-5------------------------------------
Use this solo to impress your other guitar friends. A great example of this scale used in a riff is a song called "Have Love Will Travel" by The Black Keys.
|---------------------------------------------------|
|---------------------------------------------------|
|---------------------------------------------------|
|-----------------------------------------------5-7-|
|-----3-5-5-3-5s7-5-3-5-3---------3-5-5-3-5s7-7-----|
|-5-5---------------------5-3-5-5-------------------|
You can use this scale in riffs, bass lines and solos. To improvise I use the chords G, C, D. This gives you your 12 bar blues progression. It sounds great for riffs and solos. You can also play these scales in any octave. So you can pick a different key and mood for the song. For example, instead of playing the first note open, your going to play any note on the fretboard, then move 3 notes up. So if your root note is 3, your next note will land on the 6th fret on the low E then continue down the extended scale.
E----------------------------11-13/15-13-11--------------------------
B-----------------------11-13--------------13-11---------------------
G----------------8-10/12------------------------12/10-8--------------
D------------8-10---------------------------------------10-8---------
A------6-8/10------------------------------------------------10/8-6--
E-3-6-8-------------------------------------------------------------8
Playing that scale in other spots is now self explanatory. All you need to do know is figure out the key you are playing the scale in, pick out a chord progression in that key, and start improvising, when you improvise, you should always record or tab out the music, therefore, if you ever spot out anything catchy you can create a song out of it. See how one scale can benefit you so greatly? Hope you learned alot, and always practise those scales. Just remember to trust your fingers.

5 comments sorted by best / new / date

    agsa6079
    Thanks I'm just learning scales and movement around the neck beyond strumming chords and i found this very helpful.
    steven seagull
    That's not a different scale at all though, it's just Em pentatonic - it's certainly a useful way to play through it and get you moving around the fretboard but it's not "The extended scale" or any other fancy name, it's just plain old Em pentatonic whichever way you slice it. It won't SOUND any different to using any other patterns of Em pentatonic though, it's still the same notes, and if you believe it does you're just kidding yourself.