Four Awesome Strats for Under $1000

A Stratocaster buyer's guide.

Four Awesome Strats for Under $1000
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While I've been a Les Paul man since my teens, I've always had a soft spot for the Fender Strat. Iconic, incredibly designed and hugely versatile - it's a classic guitar for a reason.

After last week's "11 Things You Didn't Know About the Fender Stratocaster," I went on a bit of a Strat playing binge - going to different guitar stores, trying out different instruments. After a while, I decided that it would be a good idea to turn my procrastination into something useful - a Stratocaster buyer's guide.

There are a few parameters to this that I should clarify before I continue. Firstly, I've only instruments currently in production and was available as new for under $1000. While I would never discourage anyone from shopping second hand for guitars, I appreciate that not everyone reading this article lives in proximity to a good pawnshop or second-hand guitar emporium. For similar reasons of availability, I've stuck to guitars that are stocked by major guitar retailers and are readily available to buy online.

Secondly, I've deliberately picked instruments that come in at different price points, ranging from entry level models to more expensive instruments. Things are laid out in order of price, starting with cheapest first.

I've stuck exclusively to Squier and Fender instruments when putting this together. Technically, no other guitar on the market is a Stratocaster, as no other company own rights to the name. I'm not just being a stickler here though - there are just too many Strat-style guitars on the market for me to sample. If you've got thoughts on the best Strats that aren't Fender or Squier, by all means share them. Maybe they can form the basis of a new feature, as voted for by users.

So without further ado, here be Strats. You may want your wallet handy...

Squier Affinity Stratocaster


Squier's entry level Strat is a great version of a classic guitar coming in at under $200. Rocking a maple or rosewood neck and solid alder body, it's a solidly crafted instrument that's ideal for beginners hoping to emulate the likes of Hendrix, Clapton and Gilmour.

The are some downsides to the Affinity - the pickups aren't amazing and the tremolo won't stay in tune - but for $200, you can't have everything. Besides, Strats are one of the easiest guitars to upgrade (part of the genius of Leo Fender's Strat design), so fitting better parts down the line is a possibility with this one.

Squier Classic Vibe Stratocaster


I've sung the praises of the Classic Vibe Strat many times in the past, and I'm not about to stop now.

For a sub $400 price, you get a hell of a guitar. Design wise, Squier's classic vibe models do an awesome job of evoking classic Fender Strats of the '50s, '60s and '70s. They're also a joy to play, holding their own against a number of the Mexican Fenders on the market. If it didn't say Squier on the headstock, I suspect they'd be selling for a lot more.

While the pickups in the Classic Vibe are better than those in the Affinity, you'll probably want to upgrade them at some point - same goes for the tremolo. But, those things aside, you still get bang for your buck.

Fender Jimmie Vaughan Artist Series Tex-Mex Stratocaster


Want a Mexican Stratocaster that plays like an American model? Look no further than the Jimmie Vaughan Artist Series Tex- Mex Stratocaster.

The Jimmie Vaughan looks the part and plays the part as well, with a lovely fast neck and synchronized tremolo adding to the appeal. Build quality is generally great and the vintage machine heads are a nice touch of character.

As well as all that, you get an awesome set of pick-ups. The Tex-Mex set included in this are as hot as you'd like, including the extra-hot bridge pick-up and the tonal range that you can get out of the instrument is suitably scorching.

Fender American Special Stratocaster

At $999.99, the Fender American Special Stratocaster only just makes it onto this list, but it definitely deserves a place.

This one is a genuine, American made Stratocaster at a price that won't break the bank. No frills compared to some of the more expensive American Strats on the market, it's still a joy to look at, while a silky smooth neck makes for a wonderful playing experience.

The Texas Special pick-ups included sound great and will give you everything from Billy Gibbons to Dave Gilmour by way of Nile Rogers.

It may be the most expensive instrument on this list, but, as a sub $1000 American Strat, the Special still feels like a bargain.


By Alec Plowman

16 comments sorted by best / new / date

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    sousa-escano
    Actually, the only one that is worth on this list is the Classic VIbe, the rest is just crappy considering the options on their budgets.
    INSULIN
    fender California strat with tex-mex pickups I have one of those love it
    Xomar
    You should expand the list to include G&Ls, too! Leo made some other great strat-type models after selling Fender. I love mine.
    Diego Carnero
    The affinity is awful in every sense. Spend you money in the anything else from the affinity onwoards, the standard has a similar price and better quality
    Walldude63
    The Eric Johnson signature model is my favorite. Yeah it's a couple hundred over the $1000 mark but well worth it. When I pared down my guitar collection I kept only it and my Les Paul for electrics. I love the way they shaped the neck, it's damn near perfect.
    Mattaka
    I think a guitar staying in tune is a priority requirement for anyone, especially on a low end guitar where the buyer is likely to be a noob and not know the first thing about guitars and upgrading. They'll likely just give up as a bad job because the tool is a bad one. Funny how you only showed Fender guitars as well... What about the myriad of other makers out there that undoubtedly make far better guitars for this price range?
    azrael4h
    IMO, I preferred the hand rubbed Strat that they made a few years back over the American Special (I owned both at one time). It just had a better tone for what I play. I currently have a Squier, but it's been upgraded with a set of Hotrails (before I bought it, so I got a heck of a deal). I solved the tremolo problem like I always do; a block of balsa wood jammed behind the block keeps it from moving.
    bobsmith25
    Nice information however I think my 1986 Fender FugiGen MIJ ST551 Stratocaster gives me all of that and much more of what a Fender should sound like