Guide To Buying An Electric Guitar

A how to on trying out and buying a guitar. This and other great information found in the EG facts sticky.

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Before you select a guitar, there are a few things you need to think over. -The style of music you play. -A budget you can live with. -How long you've been playing. If you've ever owned a guitar before. We all gravitate towards the guitar that looks the Hawtest, but looks and color, shouldn't be your first concern. Wood type, bridge type, pickup configuration, guitar weight, brand reputation, and UG member recommendations should all come into play. You need to have in mind, a few guitars that suit you best, before you even walk into the store.

Walking Into The Store

Wait, you've already blown it! Are you sure you're in the right place? Most of us only have a couple of options. Ideally you live in an area with large chains, and local shops. Keep in mind that large chains pay their workers with commission. A money driven worker will not be working towards your best interest, no matter how nice he seems. Local shops might be able to offer you a better deal, but they don't carry as large a selection. It's good to get prices online, some stores will even match competitor's prices, but whenever possible, physically play as many guitars as possible. Keep in mind that in most cases, the recommended list price for a guitar, is about twice its actual selling price. In addition, when you are trying to get more guitar for the money, It might be worth your time to look into local pawn shops, classified Ads or to check out Ebay. There are some good deals out there, you just need to know where to look.

Take A Friend

Guitar stores can be overwhelming. When possible, bring a guitar playing friend with you, preferably someone with purchasing experience. You want him to be objective and to run interference for you, if you run into any pushy sales associates. Start off by finding the models and styles in your price range. If you aren't happy with the choices, at least you'll create a basis for comparison. If you have a favorite type of pick, make sure you have one in your pocket. You want to feel as comfortable as possible. There's no reason to call over a sales associate just yet, because you should start off by playing your choices acoustically.

Testing A Guitar

Once you're certain about the model, you're ready to test some guitars. Don't be afraid to ask for one off the wall. When they don't want one played, they will usually tag it, but it's a good idea to leave the top shelf guitars alone unless they are in your price range. Let the sales staff know you're serious and they will be more willing to work with you on a good deal. To make things simple, I've made a checklist. Before playing... -Sit down in a quiet area and feel the guitars weight. Make sure it's balanced, and suited to your size. -Move the knobs and switch. Make sure they are tight. -Go to the input jack, see if it wiggles. -Lift the guitar to your face. Check the headstock and neck joint for small cracks or chips. -See if the neck looks straight. -Shake the guitar. Listen for loose parts. -Look at the fretboard. Make sure there are no wood imperfections, raised or crooked frets. Make sure the frets don't poke through the side of the board. Before plugging in.... -Strum and fret each string. You're listening for fret buzz. Keep in mind, guitars aren't always set up prior to placement on the selling floor. Sometimes they aren't even tuned. Action and fret buzz are USUALLY adjustable, but the guitar shouldn't buzz and rattle everywhere. -Check the guitar's harmonics. Compare tones at the 12th. See if the guitar is intonated. -Make sure the board isn't too wide for you. See if you can reach the higher frets. -Make sure the bridge saddles are level, with no sharp points. -Make sure the tuners don't feel loose. Amp it up... -Ok, find the pain in the ass sales guy. You'll need a guitar cable, and an amp, Just Like The One You Have At Home! Don't Let him plug you into a $1,000 amp. You're testing the guitar not the amp. -If possible, have a riff ready. If you're tagged as a complete noob, you'll get less respect. -Use the switch. Select the neck pickup. Select the bridge. Listen for crackling noises. Roll the knobs and listen for noise. Touch and lift your hand off the bridge, listen for buzzing that stops when you ground it. If you're into Metal, and are looking at a humbucker guitar, expect to hear less noise than if you were testing a single-coil guitar. -Check the pickups with the amp on clean and with gain.

Questions To Ask...

-Hopefully you already know the wood type of your choice guitar. You need to make sure the salesman knows that you've done your homework. "Do you have any other Mahogany guitars in this price range, you could recommend?" -Let the salesman know that you've noticed any imperfections. "I like this ibanez, but I'm picking up fretbuzz through the amp. Do your guitars come setup?" -Spend a while playing the guitar. Look upset even if you like the guitar. "What can I get this guitar for?" "Does this guitar come with a case?" You want to walk out of there, with as many free extras as possible. Especially if you've found anything wrong with the guitar. Any minor flaw, might work as a bargaining chip. - "What's your return policy?"

Final Thoughts...

If You Like The Guitar On The Sales Floor, Take That Guitar, Not One From The Stockroom. Unless it's a floor model, you should still get a box for it. You just don't want to take the time to find the perfect guitar, only to end up with a lemon in the end. Also keep in mind, stores make a lot of money off of purchase insurance. In almost every case, it's not worth it to buy protection on a guitar. Except for the neck, every part is easily replaced. In addition, any flaws would be apparent within the usual 30 day return time frame. Good Luck, Jenny.

68 comments sorted by best / new / date

comments policy
    PiCSeL
    ^ tldr; may be you should write your own article instead of posting wall of text in comments?
    twat
    "-If possible, have a riff ready. If you're tagged as a complete noob, you'll get less respect." Who cares about respect? If you're just starting out you're going to sound like a "noob" anyway. Plus, you're in a guitar store. Who's there that you want respect from.
    I guess the more you know, the less the guy in the store is going to try and palm you off with some rubbish that he's getting a 'clear these' bonus for.
    ticklemeemo
    jj1565 wrote: we'll less respect from a sales person can cost you. they tend to play favorites. sorry if it's blunt and i'm not saying i agree with the practice, but it's true. also, you never want to take a guitar from the back room, when it's boxed and you havent played it. that's how they dump their bad stock.
    When I was looking for a guitar recently I plugged into a 3120 and got it up to good tone volume, not too loud, not too soft. I let the guy who was helping me play around a bit and show off, then I started playing. The girls at the front started clapping when I finished, and the guy was going to give me a pretty good deal, but in the end I bought it online because I got $200 off the price they were going to give me. It is always good to seem knowledgeable, so that people won't try to rip you off. However, I felt your guide was written for people who already own a guitar. Noobs won't know how to check intonation, and many new guitarists can't tell the bridge from the nut.
    brewstercraven
    There's no reason to call over a sales associate just yet, because you should start off by playing your choices acoustically.
    maybe its different in the states (i cant see how it would be) but in guitar shops you DO NOT go and pick up any guitar you like. not even the cheap ones. picking up a guitar at random and starting to play it will get you kicked out. they are insured when a staff member gives it you, they arent if you just pick it up. just picking up guitars and struming away will do nothing but piss off the staff.
    jj1565
    Glenn Guitar wrote: This is great, i was deciding between a used fender mex strat, and a dean avalanche 7 and i chose the dean. Probably because it was more of a metal guitar, 24 frets and all the likings. i still liked the strat though, and kinda regret getting my dean. should i have got the strat?
    i guess that's really up to you. but if you don't like your guitar, and remember most of your tone comes from your amp, then maybe it's time to trade it in.
    fuzzymunkee
    great article, screw guitar center, horrible customer service and you pay for the name. I tend to go to my local shops because the workers are nice and willing to help you while not try to sell you b.s. products to make money.
    Glenn Guitar
    This is great, i was deciding between a used fender mex strat, and a dean avalanche 7 and i chose the dean. Probably because it was more of a metal guitar, 24 frets and all the likings. i still liked the strat though, and kinda regret getting my dean. should i have got the strat?
    jj1565
    rudesill wrote: Make sure its balanced? so much for SG's
    wider strap. and cheers all :cheers:
    deadbyday666
    should have read this earlier...just bought a BC RICH DRACO 3 days ago...it suits my style though
    OMMad
    perfect timing with this article... i'm going to buy my first electric guitar at the end of june (when my paycheck finally comes in). first thing i did was print this article out.
    Patriot1zzy
    I remember buying my first guitar on December based solely on brand name and price. I still think my ESP LTD AX-50 is better than most $200 price range guitars.
    Rockinguitar
    Nice guide. Simple, effective, and even the hardest headbanger who's knocked his brain to mush can understand it.
    wstoermer
    Do you do this with everything you buy? You should write a book: "How to make enemies and alienate people" - By: -YOUR MAME HERE- You do it all under the baner of not getting screwed, because you think you are a victum, and you assume people are out to get you. You come in to a store with your friend that will enteruped the sales person that is explaning something to you (because you asked), as you sit there 'looking upset' (as you put it). I would like to know how many shops you have been asked to leave or have been kicked out of. From what you have said , You seem to treat people like crap that are paid to help people like you, even when they would rather kick you out of the store themselves. In reality, they would rather make a sale that works, rather than one that does not. They know that you can get stuff on E-bay and in a lot of other places . It will come as a shock, but they might even help you save money, If you do not act like an ***hole to them and the rest of the staff. Any normal person will make friends with the salesmen, realize that these guys play guitar too, and that they know what works and what is hype. You can tell when a salesman is hyping something and you call them on it , but you treat them like you would like to be treated . You do not go in to a store trying to see how much you can screw them out of, because they will return the favor, and then you had better find another place to shop. Because... If you go back, they might call the 'Five-O' on you, because they have the right to refuse service to whoever they deem a problem, and you will get to know security better in the process. It is always a great idea to go online, before you set foot in a store , so you can get an idea of: what you are looking for, price range, brands, what other people are saying about the guitars they have played and/or own. You might ask people that you know that play and they will tell you where to shop, who to talk to, and they might even go with you. Chances are, they know a few of the people that own and/or run the store and a large number of the staff. I walk into the local Guitar Center, SamAsh, or Pet's Music (small store) and they know me. They know that I am there to buy. The staff also likes to be friendly. We trade stories about gigs, talk about what pedals are better for what and why, exchange playing tips, gab about experiences, and hang out. It is a place where you can talk music and almost everyone knows what you are talking about. If you are starting out, do your homework online, compare, read up on what people or sites are saying. ASK YOUR TEACHER (the person teaching you guitar ) who they know or where they shop. You do not live in a vacume . DO NOT show up to a store trying to front, the people at the store have played and/or sold for years, they will read right through you and know you are faking it. I do curtesy and buy something, every time I come in (strings, pics, books, patch cables, or whatever), and I have fun when I look around. Treat others with respect, even if they do not, or you are adding to the problem. YOU CAN ALWAYS LEAVE! Most of the time I know the salesmen and I get someone I know, Because they did their job and I have built trust with them. NOT by putting up a front and trying to scam the store with my friend being a wingman. I play guitar, I build them, and I own the company that has it's name on the headstock. I Have worked in sales and know my guitars, amps, equipment, pedals, strings, picks, and the rest. I have been a retial salesman and I can tell you that I like to help people and would rather have them get a deal and leave happy (they tended to come back to me again this way ) with items that they need, rather than hype an item that they do not want or need and lose the sale and the customer. I actually liked to give people deals and give them more bang for their buck. Most good salesmen feel the same way. I was top in my district, I made good money, and I never needed to steam-roll a customer. They would come to me, even if it was just to say hello, and they would send their friends and family to me. You are the kind of person that the salesman just want to leave the store and not comeback. You might know that a strait guitar neck is a good thing, but you are in need of an attatude ajustment, and you need to learn how to shop.
    Philic10us
    well all I'm looking for really is a very versatile guitar, like I was thinking Ibanez but the thing is is that I'm always taken in by big names well price isn't really a problem (as I have just recieved a nice inheritance) but because where I live there isn't really a great selection unless I go abroad, which I don't really wanna do unless I'm sure about a guitar
    jsurf06
    wstoermer wrote:. I do curtesy and buy something, every time I come in (strings, pics, books, patch cables, or whatever), and I have fun when I look around. Treat others with respect, even if they do not, or you are adding to the problem. YOU CAN ALWAYS LEAVE! Most of the time I know the salesmen and I get someone I know, Because they did their job and I have built trust with them. NOT by putting up a front and trying to scam the store with my friend being a wingman.
    excellent
    jj1565
    wstoermer ... wow, take a pill. i worked in retail a really long time. -i've been buying guitars and equipment for even longer. -this is an honest list when trying out a guitar. -you got all upset that a said the sales guys is a pain who works on commission? well don't worry. if you've never sold low quality mgs or spiders to kids then this article is not about you. if you want to write a page about great guys selling quality amps and guitars, go for it, but it's pointless. -these kids mostly buy at large chains. when i walk into stores i get all the help i want too, because i'm buying off the top shelf, but that's not going to help these guys at all. let them get famous like you. then the sales guys will kiss their asses too. thanks for reading
    Busproof
    Shame I couldn't have read this over a year ago when I bought my Jackson. Luckily, I made a solid choice though, but I surely didn't go through any of these steps. I was a complete noob then too.
    prateak
    good one. i bought my first guitar so randomly. but thank god. it gets finer with age
    prateak
    wstoermer wrote: Do you do this with everything you buy? You should write a book: "How to make enemies and alienate people" - By: -YOUR MAME HERE- You do it all under the baner of not getting screwed, because you think you are a victum, and you assume people are out to get you. You come in to a store with your friend that will enteruped the sales person that is explaning something to you (because you asked), as you sit there 'looking upset' (as you put it). I would like to know how many shops you have been asked to leave or have been kicked out of. From what you have said, You seem to treat people like crap that are paid to help people like you, even when they would rather kick you out of the store themselves. In reality, they would rather make a sale that works, rather than one that does not. They know that you can get stuff on E-bay and in a lot of other places. It will come as a shock, but they might even help you save money, If you do not act like an ***hole to them and the rest of the staff. Any normal person will make friends with the salesmen, realize that these guys play guitar too, and that they know what works and what is hype. You can tell when a salesman is hyping something and you call them on it, but you treat them like you would like to be treated. You do not go in to a store trying to see how much you can screw them out of, because they will return the favor, and then you had better find another place to shop. Because... If you go back, they might call the 'Five-O' on you, because they have the right to refuse service to whoever they deem a problem, and you will get to know security better in the process. It is always a great idea to go online, before you set foot in a store, so you can get an idea of: what you are looking for, price range, brands, what other people are saying about the guitars they have played and/or own. You might ask people that you know that play and they will tell you where to shop, who to talk to, and they might even go with you. Chances are, they know a few of the people that own and/or run the store and a large number of the staff. I walk into the local Guitar Center, SamAsh, or Pet's Music (small store) and they know me. They know that I am there to buy. The staff also likes to be friendly. We trade stories about gigs, talk about what pedals are better for what and why, exchange playing tips, gab about experiences, and hang out. It is a place where you can talk music and almost everyone knows what you are talking about. If you are starting out, do your homework online, compare, read up on what people or sites are saying. ASK YOUR TEACHER (the person teaching you guitar) who they know or where they shop. You do not live in a vacume. DO NOT show up to a store trying to front, the people at the store have played and/or sold for years, they will read right through you and know you are faking it. I do curtesy and buy something, every time I come in (strings, pics, books, patch cables, or whatever), and I have fun when I look around. Treat others with respect, even if they do not, or you are adding to the problem. YOU CAN ALWAYS LEAVE! Most of the time I know the salesmen and I get someone I know, Because they did their job and I have built trust with them. NOT by putting up a front and trying to scam the store with my friend being a wingman. I play guitar, I build them, and I own the company that has it's name on the headstock. I Have worked in sales and know my guitars, amps, equipment, pedals, strings, picks, and the rest. I have been a retial salesman and I can tell you that I like to help people and would rather have them get a deal and leave happy (they tended to come back to me again this way) with items that they need, rather than hype an item that they do not want or need and lose the sale and the customer. I actually liked to give people deals and give them more bang for their buck. Most good salesmen feel the same way. I was top in my district, I made good money, and I never needed to steam-roll a customer. They would come to me, even if it was just to say hello, and they would send their friends and family to me. You are the kind of person that the salesman just want to leave the store and not comeback. You might know that a strait guitar neck is a good thing, but you are in need of an attatude ajustment, and you need to learn how to shop.
    i like this one. SO TRUE
    nesveikuolis
    wstoermer wrote: Do you do this with everything you buy? You should write a book: "How to make enemies and alienate people" - By: -YOUR MAME HERE- You do it all under the baner of not getting screwed, because you think you are a victum, and you assume people are out to get you. You come in to a store with your friend that will enteruped the sales person that is explaning something to you (because you asked), as you sit there 'looking upset' (as you put it). I would like to know how many shops you have been asked to leave or have been kicked out of. From what you have said, You seem to treat people like crap that are paid to help people like you, even when they would rather kick you out of the store themselves. In reality, they would rather make a sale that works, rather than one that does not. They know that you can get stuff on E-bay and in a lot of other places. It will come as a shock, but they might even help you save money, If you do not act like an ***hole to them and the rest of the staff. Any normal person will make friends with the salesmen, realize that these guys play guitar too, and that they know what works and what is hype. You can tell when a salesman is hyping something and you call them on it, but you treat them like you would like to be treated. You do not go in to a store trying to see how much you can screw them out of, because they will return the favor, and then you had better find another place to shop. Because... If you go back, they might call the 'Five-O' on you, because they have the right to refuse service to whoever they deem a problem, and you will get to know security better in the process. It is always a great idea to go online, before you set foot in a store, so you can get an idea of: what you are looking for, price range, brands, what other people are saying about the guitars they have played and/or own. You might ask people that you know that play and they will tell you where to shop, who to talk to, and they might even go with you. Chances are, they know a few of the people that own and/or run the store and a large number of the staff. I walk into the local Guitar Center, SamAsh, or Pet's Music (small store) and they know me. They know that I am there to buy. The staff also likes to be friendly. We trade stories about gigs, talk about what pedals are better for what and why, exchange playing tips, gab about experiences, and hang out. It is a place where you can talk music and almost everyone knows what you are talking about. If you are starting out, do your homework online, compare, read up on what people or sites are saying. ASK YOUR TEACHER (the person teaching you guitar) who they know or where they shop. You do not live in a vacume. DO NOT show up to a store trying to front, the people at the store have played and/or sold for years, they will read right through you and know you are faking it. I do curtesy and buy something, every time I come in (strings, pics, books, patch cables, or whatever), and I have fun when I look around. Treat others with respect, even if they do not, or you are adding to the problem. YOU CAN ALWAYS LEAVE! Most of the time I know the salesmen and I get someone I know, Because they did their job and I have built trust with them. NOT by putting up a front and trying to scam the store with my friend being a wingman. I play guitar, I build them, and I own the company that has it's name on the headstock. I Have worked in sales and know my guitars, amps, equipment, pedals, strings, picks, and the rest. I have been a retial salesman and I can tell you that I like to help people and would rather have them get a deal and leave happy (they tended to come back to me again this way) with items that they need, rather than hype an item that they do not want or need and lose the sale and the customer. I actually liked to give people deals and give them more bang for their buck. Most good salesmen feel the same way. I was top in my district, I made good money, and I never needed to steam-roll a customer. They would come to me, even if it was just to say hello, and they would send their friends and family to me. You are the kind of person that the salesman just want to leave the store and not comeback. You might know that a strait guitar neck is a good thing, but you are in need of an attatude ajustment, and you need to learn how to shop.
    Absoloute WIN comment. Altho this guide might work for low end second-hand guitars, you must respect the sales guy. In Lithuania, there are only 3 "chains" (1-3 shops of each in different pars of the country, not much) - midiaudio, tamsta, muzikos faktorius (Premium Yamaha retailer), so not much choice. You must pay respect to the sales guys, cause they will remember you if you do/don't and that will influence your future sales. Since I buy something every few months or so and I don't act like a dick when I'm talking to them, I usually get killer prices, almost at wholesale rate. Final summation - be friends with "the dude" and you'll be better off than trying to ou
    jj1565
    brewstercraven wrote: There's no reason to call over a sales associate just yet, because you should start off by playing your choices acoustically. maybe its different in the states (i cant see how it would be) but in guitar shops you DO NOT go and pick up any guitar you like. not even the cheap ones. picking up a guitar at random and starting to play it will get you kicked out. they are insured when a staff member gives it you, they arent if you just pick it up. just picking up guitars and struming away will do nothing but piss off the staff.
    yeah, that part's true. in some higher end stores and maybe in some other countries. they don't want guys touching the merch without permission. in almost all the large chain stores i've ever walked into, they want you to pick up the gear, and will tag the higher priced stuff. "ask for assistance." as you can tell from pretty much the first sentence. this is about trying guitars, for the most part in large chain stores.
    the boogieman
    wesselbindt wrote: thefoldarsoldar wrote: I'm getting mad deja vu. Is this in the forums somewhere?? Lately the forums have been posting their guides as columns. I think it's a good thing, cuz now more people can find these great guides.
    its better this way though no one ever reads the stickied threads, and even if they do, they dont pay attention and follow the advice
    iloverhcp
    jj1565 wrote: brewstercraven wrote: There's no reason to call over a sales associate just yet, because you should start off by playing your choices acoustically. maybe its different in the states (i cant see how it would be) but in guitar shops you DO NOT go and pick up any guitar you like. not even the cheap ones. picking up a guitar at random and starting to play it will get you kicked out. they are insured when a staff member gives it you, they arent if you just pick it up. just picking up guitars and struming away will do nothing but piss off the staff. yeah, that part's true. in some higher end stores and maybe in some other countries. they don't want guys touching the merch without permission. in almost all the large chain stores i've ever walked into, they want you to pick up the gear, and will tag the higher priced stuff. "ask for assistance." as you can tell from pretty much the first sentence. this is about trying guitars, for the most part in large chain stores.
    um...in the Guitar Center by my house (Concord, CA) i picked up a $2,000 Taylor and started playing it. then i moved on to another expensive guitar and started playing it too....they really don't care. because, in the U.S., if you break it, you buy it
    retka
    I normally shop at the local Guitar Center. However when I decided to finally get an electric guitar, I went to the local town guitar shop. It is a really small guitar shop but they have a good selection of used guitars. I ended up getting a perfect condition guitar worth an upwards of $1500 for about $350 with a really nice guitar case. I have had the guitar for over a year and am still happy with the purcahse. Shopping around before purchasing a guitar is a good way to find a great deal thats hidden among all the overpriced rip-offs.
    kennmi
    wstoermer wrote: Most good salesmen feel the same way. I was top in my district, I made good money, and I never needed to steam-roll a customer.
    i agree with you that you shouldnt be a dick to the workers there, but i think you partially missed the point of the article. its focus is more on not getting screwed if your a beginner going into a guitar store. not all associates who come over to you are going to be employee of the month material who has your best interests in mind. you dont want to be a dick, but you also dont want to part with your hard-earned money for a sub-par product. in the end, they still want your money, even if you do act like a ass, but they sure as hell wont be helpful to you in future visites if you are.
    DeadxEndxEmpty
    also you might want to note wether or not the guitar is set-up for active or passive pickups. very useful thing to know when your guitar sounds like ass and you spend upwards of $40 to get it looked at when all you gotta do is change the battery.
    jj1565
    Philic10us wrote: well all I'm looking for really is a very versatile guitar, like I was thinking Ibanez but the thing is is that I'm always taken in by big names well price isn't really a problem (as I have just recieved a nice inheritance) but because where I live there isn't really a great selection unless I go abroad, which I don't really wanna do unless I'm sure about a guitar
    screw the "big name" stuff. make sure your amp is above average, and get the guitar that's easiest to play keeping in mind that you will want pickups and bridge to complement your style of play. single coils VS. humbuckers and floyd or trem VS TOM.
    skatelover_911
    I of course am reading this after my graduation party. I bought a new ibanez with my grad money and haven't noticed any flaws but now I am going to get concious and go check it out
    decayingdave
    Good guide, simple but very effective tips abound. I live in an area with no chains and only small shops that are full of inbreds and snobs, hence the reason why I only buy online.
    Do Re Mi
    "-If possible, have a riff ready. If you're tagged as a complete noob, you'll get less respect." Who cares about respect? If you're just starting out you're going to sound like a "noob" anyway. Plus, you're in a guitar store. Who's there that you want respect from. Other people buying stuff you won't ever see again, and the sales people, which couldn't care less as long as you're buying something. Ha, other than that, it's a good guide. But, I also wondered why anyone would ever want a floor model when they could get one that's never been played out of stock?
    jj1565
    Buying online can be a great alternative. just make sure they have a good return policy, with no restocking fee, and that they are will to send out a free shipping label if a return for reason is needed. :cheers:
    Will-kun
    those pointers are very helpful. I'm planning on buying a second hand guitar soon. I knew I needed to get some strategies ready but some things in this article are new to meand very helpful. thanks
    notsominidude
    wish id read this before i bought my guitar (jackson js30rr)i bought it offline for 180 but at first i hated it i found it to heavy and there was just something about it and then i prefered my encore lp, now i like it thought but thats just cause i played it non stop until i stopped hating it
    jj1565
    notsominidude wrote: wish id read this before i bought my guitar (jackson js30rr)i bought it offline for 180 but at first i hated it i found it to heavy and there was just something about it and then i prefered my encore lp, now i like it thought but thats just cause i played it non stop until i stopped hating it
    the strap pins might need to be moved. also, try a wider or padded strap if you haven't already. ^, and thanks
    chickrawker
    theres a user on ebay where i got mine used and i could barely tell. it was at least half off even after a little back n forth with the other interested people and a good hardshell case was only 70 or so... i think its something like the guitar hop or somethingg like that. but check em out theyre always selling stuff on there
    wesselbindt
    thefoldarsoldar wrote: I'm getting mad deja vu. Is this in the forums somewhere??
    Lately the forums have been posting their guides as columns. I think it's a good thing, cuz now more people can find these great guides.
    Quinlan
    Yes, I've read this a forum sticky or something, still a good read though. I reference it for my friends, family etc... Nice work Jenny.
    Guitarfreak777
    Very nice job, im going to start looking for a new guitar this summer and this is just what I need to know