How to Write Good Guitar Pro Tabs

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How to Write Good Guitar Pro Tabs
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1) Use as few tracks as possible.

It's important to keep the track panel as concise as possible, so use track variations/automation where possible, and condense everything into one track. For example, all the lead guitar work can go into a single track like in the picture below (but you should always tab both stereo rhythm guitars unless you're absolutely sure there's no difference in the tracks as well as no pan tricks at any point).

2) Don't use bar repeats.

Using repeats makes things easy and is ok if you're only tabbing out the guitars (which you shouldn't anyway, more on this later). But if you have a drum track, it's most certainly going to have differentfills at the end of each section of the song, and using bar repeats disables you from writing the correct drum part for the respective bars. So you should always write the song all the way through, using as many bars as needed.

3) Tab out every instrument.

I always think of Guitar Pro as not just a tab editor, but a way of experiencing the whole song and I approach the editing process with the same principle. If you're just going to write the guitar tab, you might as well use the text editor; a full tab is good for everybody, since for example if a band wants to cover a song and they open your tab and see all the instruments are present, it's gonna make their job a lot easier and subsequently increase the chance of your tab getting a high rating. Understandably, not every instrument can always possibly be tabbed, but at least the basic band setup of all guitars + bass + drums should be covered. If suitable, also cover the vocals (as a separate guitar or synth track). And don't just half-ass it, the bass may have intricacies that are only heard when you EQ the rest of the song out, so they're not necessarily following the guitars all the time. And don't use generic drum beats that only somewhat match the song throughout the whole track, each bar should have its correct beat and fill, all according to the studio version of the song. Watching a live show will help with figuring out the cymbal work, but be wary as many drummers use a different setup live than in the studio, so the song ends up being played a little different.

4) Use Transcribe! or similar software when figuring out a song.

Transcribe! is a great app for this task, you can slow down a track with no pitch shift, EQ and pan, cut out the vocals (karaoke function), use the note guess function (you can setup the guitar tuning in the settings so that the piano roll also shows the position of the notes on the fretboard), etc, all pretty much one-two clicks away. Sure you can use any DAW but i find Transcribe! the most intuitive and fitting for this kind of work.

5) Always use the correct studio tuning and riff fingerings for guitars/bass.

There's no such thing as "adapting" a song to a more common tuning/guitar type (eg writing a 7-string song tab for a 6-string guitar), everything should be as true to the original as possible. Learning tabs is also a way of exploring the band, and you're compromising that if you take liberties with the way the band originally wrote the song. Especially in advanced metal bands, where low and unusual tunings are more common, you should go out of your way of figuring out the correct tunings and fingerings for all stringed instruments. Watch live performances, read interviews and gear/rig rundowns, it's possible to find out a lot. Few things are more frustrating than opening a tab and realizing while it's pitch-correct, it's in the wrong tuning or on a different guitar type whatsoever.

6) Avoid note dynamics as much as possible (forte, piano, etc).

Unfortunately, the RSE samples are still not perfect, and different note dynamics can make the same instrument sound completely different by itself and in the mix. You should really choose one dynamic and stick with it, for guitars I usually go with f or ff, rarely fff, and drums are almost always ff. If you need to add some dynamic variation to certain notes/beats, use the ghost/accented note functions. For example, the tom samples are so much lower than the rest of the drums and get drowned out in a busy mix, so i always add heavy accents on tom fills in my tabs.

7) Mark each section for easy navigation.

GP has a feature of inserting a section description so it's easier to jump from one part of the song to next. Just put the cursor at the beginning of a bar and press Shift+Insert, a window will pop up where you can choose one of the preset section types or write your own. Please avoid writing long descriptions and just stick to short ones like "Chorus, Breakdown, Leads, Solo, etc". Use the text function for longer description (place cursor on a note an press T), it will also show up right above where you placed the cursor, not just at the beginning of the bar, so it's a more specific way of describing things, use it for marking parts you're not sure about.

8) Use volume/pan automations

Use them to match any fade in/out effect and pan effects present in the song. Also, use them for altering the mix during the song when for example a lead comes on and the rhythm tracks need to get turned down (if necessary).

9) Double-click on that volume slider, will ya?

When you open a new project or add a new track, the track volume slider is set at -0.3dB, if you double click it, it defaults to -2dB in GP6 and -4dB in GP7. Use this value as your base and leave it that way, since it makes your track less noisy. If you need to alter the instrument in the mix, do it from the instrument effect chain (usually tweaking the amp volume or the EQ master slider does the trick). This keeps the relative volume of the instruments consistent across all tracks so that you can figure out what needs to be fixed through the instrument effects panel. Guitar Pro 7 introduced automatic relative volume shifting where the master volume slider decides the overall volume, while the track volume sliders only relatively affect it, ie, if you have 1 track, it will occupy the whole volume space, if you have 2 tracks with equal volume sliders, they would each occupy half the volume space and still sound only as loud as your master volume allows. This helps with keeping your volumes in check and ears safe but also makes mixing harder as it's harder to recognize which track got drowned out.

10) Please, please make sure your bars are complete and song structure is preserved

If you're a new tabber, this could be a daunting task, but it's better not to publish your tab whatsoever than to have an out-of-time one. Make sure your tab structurally sounds just like the song, it shouldn't fall out of rhythm/time because you failed to figure out the correct time signature for a bar. And don't use unnecessary tempo changes, or try to (wrongly) interpret a hard-to-tab part with a tempo change instead of note values (eg quarter notes @60bpm = half notes @120bpm, triplets, etc), most songs are written in one tempo and I've seen a lot of tabs that add unneeded/wrong tempo changes for different sections, only use them when there's a definite tempo change in the song, annotate anything else with correct note values.

11) Annotate all palm mutes/tappings/slides, etc.

Don't be lazy and mark everything as close to the original song as possible, including palm mutes, tapping, sliding, vibratos, etc. You should also watch lives and preserve the correct fingering/positioning and playing styles (eg whether it's a slide or a hammer on or just normal picking, etc) for riffs and solos.

12) About solos, n-tuplets, dotted notes and bends

Most solos don't strictly follow the click and it can be tricky to figure out how many notes of what value fall into a bar. As per principle, you should try to go for the feel of the song and use n-tuplets, dotted notes and anything else in your arsenal to keep it authentic. As for bends, they're probably the easiest to make errors with and get fooled by the tab, but if you're really attentive, you should be able to get them right with the help of pre-bend and bend-release functions. Remember, a bad-written bend can break the whole feel of a lick, so don't ignore them.

13) Choose correct playing style, pickups, etc

Choose a finger-style bass if the band's bassist uses fingers, if it's a heavy song, choose a L.Paul guitar with bridge or combined pickups. Choose either default playing style or StringedPick for pick players and StringedFinger for finger players. Choose rock drums preset for rock/metal songs, etc. That is, make everything as close to the style of the song as possible. NOTE: Choosing the anything other than the default playing style may sometimes make your rhythm guitars sound funny with all the added dynamics, so be advised.

14) Write a good description for your tab in the submission page

Fortunately, UG finally added the option to write a description for tabs on the tab view page, so please include anything specific that people need to know about the tab (ie custom tuning, things to note, etc). Also, DO NOT choose a tuning from the list if it doesn't match the one in the tab (ie choosing standard tuning when submitting a 7-string tab would still only show up as EADGBE standard 6-string tuning), so it's better to leave it blank and explain it in the tab description.


This is it. Hope this helps in your tabbing process and improves the quality of submitted tabs.

64 comments sorted by best / new / date

    troyofyort
    Some good stuff that works for most cases. TBH there are so many intricacies to vocal parts I am against tabbing them. Also for certain bands, using those dynamics is key to get the proper sound, I'm constantly needing to use that in my Fall of Troy tabs. I'm so glad you also advise for getting both stereo tracks and not using repeats!
    DarthTyrannus83
    I agree, and its correct to use different dynamics for whole sections of songs that have varying intensity, what i meant applies more to using multiple dynamic feels within the same bar, section or riff, which could sound like a sudden EQ jump when replaying the tab.
    selkayann
    What about fingerstyle tabs, where sometimes the melody needs to be stronger than the rest?
    DarthTyrannus83
    Never tabbed such songs, this article is probably too one sided in that aspect. I reckon its one of the few cases where different dynamics within a bar are justified.
    jimmy-moto
    15) GP5 > GP6/7
    skyturnedred
    Hells yeah, I have no idea how they made it so much worse each version.
    DarthTyrannus83
    What exactly is worse? The only thing i can think of that would be a legitimate reason for people to fuss about is the drum editing in gp6 and they brought the tab editor back in gp7. Then again, i personally find it way more intuitive to use the classic notation for drums rather than mess with random numbers that dont correlate with percussion instruments whatsoever. Other than that, you could draw custom bending charts for bends in gp5, but thats nothing one cannot get with different bend types in later gp versions. GP6 and 7 look much better and more ergonomic in design, the fact that people dont take the 10 minutes to get used to the new interface is not the programs fault, gp5 looks dated and its engine sounds dated too, plus the lack of support for 8-strings is the biggest turn off. In facts its already a shame that gp7 didnt add support for 9/10-string guitars.
    DarthTyrannus83
    Now try to tab an 8-string song on GP5 Ill wait.
    Lelvolution
    You're bringing back memories of frustrating tabs with 6 string guitars tuned to F#BEADG and standard, to get all the notes for a single 8 string guitar.
    DarthTyrannus83
    Exactly. Shit is 12 years old, people should get with the times, i dont know of another piece of software thats receiving regular updates but has the majority of the userbase still stuck on the decade old version.
    DissonantTimbre
    I hated GP6 when it first came out but after exploring it a few weeks I couldn't imagine dealing with 5 again. But then again this is an industry of people still using tubes...
    NosferatuZodd09
    what do you think makes 6 better than 5?
    DarthTyrannus83
    Its easier on the eye, tools are hidden in the side panel, so more viewing space on my old small monitor, its RSE is way better, 8-string guitar support, etc. Its not that i hated gp5 and was eagerly waiting for gp6 to be released, its just that when it got released, i tried it and didnt see a reason to cling to a 5 year old software, none of the complaints people had with it really bothered me or hindered my ability to write tabs, so i just stuck with the newer version.
    stefan_771
    I agree with no 5 most of all. Trying to find QOTSA tabs the other day and finding they were in E standard instead of the actual C standard was frutrating
    DissonantTimbre
    The worst is when it's clear a band plays seven string guitars and it's tabbed out on six string in drop d.
    theman6
    Superb article, incredibly complete, I am one of those people who likes to tab songs Guitar Pro with absolutely every instrument, vocals and sound effects, in the most accurate way possible, I pretty much agree with everything listed on here, except maybe the Transcribe! part (I mostly use the original track, I very rarely feel the need to slow it down), a couple more suggestions I can add: 1. Don't forget the rhythm. A LOT of people I've seen who tab on Guitar Pro usually have very good ear for harmony and melodies, but usually half-ass the rhythmic part, usually ending in a pattern that sounds way off (and that shouldn't be hard to transcribe, if you put enough attention to it). This applies to every instrument and also it's sort of my justification for tabbing vocals with no melody (like growls and screams, for example). 2. In case you're using GP5 (like I do), it's very advisable to start using Soundfonts (instead of either raw midis or RSE), look for CoolSoft VirtualMIDISynth, it may not have all the intricacies GP6 or GP7 have (I have yet to use them so I'm not sure), but they sound miles better than anything else in GP5, across all instruments available, not just guitar 3. If you're tabbing vocals, make sure to tab the lyrics as well, applying the correct syllable to each note accurately 4. If you have trouble figuring out the song by the original recording alone, try finding more sources you can pick up the parts from, a few examples  -Live versions of the song (work most of the time, unless they choose to play it differently)  -Covers from different musicians  -Isolated tracks. These may not always be available, but you have to make sure before beginning because it's going to save you huge amounts of ear work  -Guitar Hero/Rock Band versions. It may sound a little weird but they help a great deal (when the song is available), most, if not all songs in these games can have their tracks isolated separately, so if a song is in one of them, there probably is an isolated track somewhere around the web. If there is not, looking at the notes played in the official GP/RB charts also help, as they're (mostly) pretty accurate in terms of intervals, and helps you find notes that can sound too low in the original mix. This may work with Rocksmith as well but I'm not familiar with it
    DarthTyrannus83
    If you can figure out the whole song without slowing it down, then huge props to you. I dont trust my ears that much, plus there are parts/notes which are pretty much impossible to recognize without very careful repeated listening with EQ tweaks and very slow speeds. i dont have perfect pitch hearing, so its a lot of work and trial and error for me, thats why Transcribe! is a life savior. 1) Agreed, shouldve probably covered that in my 10th point too. And if its somewhat ok when simple power chord progressions with constant strumming pattern with lots of distortion get mistreated because figuring out the correct rhythm in the busy mix might be hard, theres no excuse for when people mess up single-note start-stop choppy stuff thats the core of the whole song. Sometimes there are so ridiculous rhythm mistakes in otherwise detailed tabs that you wonder why the tab-maker even bothered with the rest if he was going to screw up the main rhythm. 2) I abandoned GP5 the moment 6 was released and now im on GP7. GP5 already felt a little old-fashioned when i started playing in 2009, GP6 interface felt so much more comfortable and sleek to me, GP7 is too cluttered on my small monitor but im getting a new one soon so thats not a problem, im always for tech progress so i switch to the newest version soon as it comes out (the lack of support for 8-string guitars is an absolute deal-breaker for me with GP5). As for the sound, both GP6 and 7 RSEs are decent and so far ive been able to more or less get the sounds i needed. I just wish they made low-end guitar samples better/tighter, i think its still too catered to standard 6-string userbase. 3) I did this with a couple of my tabs, but generally its intuitive enough to figure out on your own. I also dont tab non-melodic vocals because it ends up in dissonance with the rest of the song. 4) Agree with all those, but if youre tabbing anything that remotely not hugely popular, youll have a hard time finding even decent pro live vids. This is where Transcribe! and experience/guessing come in for me.
    theman6
    As for the third point, when I tab non-melodic vocals I just use dead notes (don't know if that's the name in english), that way the rhythm is tabbed accurately and it doesn't mess up the rest of the mix, either that or just use really low dynamics And yes, if it's not a popular song you will be forced to use the original track and/or eq tricks, but for example, recently I tabbed Roundabout by Yes in full band, a HUGELY popular song, yet every single tab online was so off it felt insulting, because the isolated tracks and live videos are available in one quick youtube search
    HeinousMelvins
    I have to add to especially pay attention to which time signature you're using and making sure it's correct.  The biggest culprit I can think of is making a measure 6/8 instead of 3/4 (and vice versa).  Those time signatures have completely different feels and natural accents that many seem to not get.  I see this a lot in Opeth tabs and such.
    lb87ralliart
    Learning the Keyboard shortcuts is very important as well. Most of them carry over all the way back from Guitar Pro 4. But learn the ones you'll use the most and they will greatly affect your efficiency with tabbing stuff out now and in the future.
    stanislas.kleczek
    15) Don't trust your ear too much, look for playthroughs, masterclasses, live videos where you can easily see the hands of the musicians. Because as an example chords can be very tricky to figure out with a distorted tone, and some bands play unusual chords or even "create" them to have the specific sound they want by using adequate intervals (cf. Mark Holcomb of Periphery). Since you make tabs so that people can learn them, it is important that the tab is the most accurate possible. Don't rush it, take your time, do researchs. Don't be one of these guys who cover songs one day after they got released. You're not a youtuber seeking for glory, you are the one who does guitar tabs that kids (or even grown-ass adults) will check to learn their favourite songs.  
    DarthTyrannus83
    Great advice. Often times i would stumble upon a tab that sounds right at first listen, but then i check a live video and the fingering is different with more/less notes and when i write that into the tab it even sounds odd and less correct than the wrong tab at first but i know its the correct way so i leave it. Ears can lie a lot indeed. You should find a balance between trusting them and double-checking everything.
    NosferatuZodd09
    I think discouraging users of the site to stop making quality guitar pro tabs of guitars, in a site called ULTIMATE GUITAR is pretty silly just because maybe most of them might not know how to tab drums/keyboards/bass; that all should be a bonus not a requirement [which they're trying to push]  The site monetizes all this free work, now they require even harder and more time consuming free work to have your work featured here, which you don't get anything from. So in short, fuck that. Yeah I'd love to have drums and bass to a lot of tabs including my own but I don't play guitar someone else doesn't play guitar, if someone plays the instrument and sees a tab that lacks it why not encourage THEM to tab the goddamn thing? As opposed to someone that probably doesn't play the other instruments that are being required.  Hopefully it'll just come back to bite the site in the ass, it's pretty ridiculous.
    NosferatuZodd09
    whoops got distracted, "... but I don't play drums or bass, [the following if someone doesn't play guitar I forgot what I meant]" "If someone plays the other instruments but it isn't tabbed for they why not encourage them to tab the goddamn thing?" fuck it lost my train of thought watching random shit trying to write this I'll figure it out later lol
    DarthTyrannus83
    The other guy could just take the existing tab and add the bass/drums, etc, its just that most tabs have some minor shit that needs to be corrected, so one ends up writing the whole thing over anyway. This article is simply meant to establish some good practice that will ensure some degree of quality in gp tabs, and gp users should know how to use the damn thing. And the most important thing you get from submitting a quality tab is the sense of satisfaction in knowledge that your work will help other people, as well as be an example.
    NosferatuZodd09
    yeah but I'm pointing out how the site seems to be shifting towards just denying guitar pro tabs that do not have all the other instruments, it's not only the fact that they might not know how to tab drums but also play them. Requiring all that extra crap for a free site that monetizes its content which isn't paid just seems silly and unreasonable. Not saying the quality of what's already tabbed shouldn't be good, cause it is, but that is also why there is a rating system. So if they're requiring perfect transcriptions from the get go, why have the rating system lol.  I just don't think having all other instruments makes any tab any better than if it was just the guitars. Most people including new users come here to say look for guitar tabs. There's a lot of tabs that might get accepted because it has a full band but all aspects of it might be horribly watered down and might seem mostly correct at first glance but then when you really pay attention it drops off. Personally the way I tab is I pitch shift if needbe because my hearing is not good enough for the lowest pitches and I play along to it, I get an idea of what is going on and recreate it on guitar... sometimes I've done it to bass solos or clearly audible bass parts but I recognize me tabbing the rest of the instruments would come half assed and just don't put it on my tabs. But I try to make sure every little detail is there when I'm tabbing guitars, fills, intricacies.
    Cynamin
    Not a bad article.  There are definitely some crap tabs out there.  I fully agree with the "not using repeats"...there is no need to in Guitar Pro/TUX Guitar.  I don't add vocals for all mine, but sometimes do...guess I'm lazy about those.  The only thing I wish, is that people using GP6+...I wish they would save a copy as GP5 and upload that too because I'm too cheap to buy GP6.  I'm so used to TUX, I don't wanna switch!
    DarthTyrannus83
    I actually proposed the idea of having the option to upload multiple GP versions of the same tab for a song, so that each GP user could choose their respective version. Mods said its a good suggestion and theyd consider it, hope theyll implement it sometime.
    fguzramm
    Dude, thanks so much for Transcribe! Never heard of that one before and it's helping me so much figuring out a solo for my first (and so far only) guitar pro tab submitted to UG!
    RoxxHunter
    The most important thing to making a good guitar pro tab is to actually listen to the song you're trying to figure out and then listen to the tab you make, and make sure the notes are the same : P Hashtag rocket science. Props to all the amazing tabbers out there who work so hard to put out incredibly accurate tabs. You all rock!
    steventhomas198
    Not sure I agree about not using dynamics. I think you should be writing the guitar pro to be read, and dynamic instructions such as forte or piano are important for that. the fact you can press play on a guitar pro track is more of an added extra, and if it doesn't sound quite exactly correct, at least the score is there for you to read.
    theman6
    Guitar Pro doesn't really work well with score, that's what the Playback compensates, if you want good scores you use MuseScore or Finale, not Guitar Pro
    steventhomas198
    Really? I've always found the score to be pretty good, I've only got GP5 though and I wish I could do more than 2 voicings on the one like for classical stuff.
    theman6
    In GP you can't choose clefs freely, there's a lot of missing ornaments to put on the score, you can't manipulate the notation, accidentals are generated automatically (instead of letting you choose), among other things You should try either MuseScore, Finale, Sibelius, or any other program made specifically for music scoring, pretty much anything is much more versatile than Guitar Pro, it's just that GP is a lot more focused on guitar music and has decent playback features
    steventhomas198
    I used sibelius back in school many many moons ago and found it rather frustrating, and thought that GP was much easier to get on with, but I'm guessing they've all come along way since then. I think I'll give them a go. Thanks for the tip
    DarthTyrannus83
    Yeah, dont think its a good idea to write music in GP that doesnt include guitars in some way.
    DarthTyrannus83
    Im not strictly against their use for separate sections of a song, but not within the same passage/riff/lick. For that i use the stressed/ghost note function. Perhaps i shouldve worded my point better, pity theres no edit option for articles. Also, the dynamics notation is something that should be provided by the composer/band, so it leaves ambiguity because you cant be sure if your interpretation of the intensity of their playing is correct. Sticking to one dynamic keeps the track more mechanically consistent imo, but of course, if the song demands it, absolutely do use them.
    killergege
    I agree with all points, except :  * Point 6 : this can be the difference between great tabs and awesome tabs. Just don't abuse it. But it's a good way to reproduce the intensity variations on a song. I often use that on drums when I want to add subtility. Drums elements don't sound the same depending on the dynamic selected in GP. * Point 8 : I'm not sure about this one. Automations lock the volume slider and you have to disable them to change it. This is really annoying... Automations is the first thing I disable when I open a tab. I don't know if GP7 fixed this though. I would add a point : use the multi-voice system when tabbing drums. It's way easier to read a tab with a snare/kick/toms voice and a separate cymbals voice, and it's easier to tab (less headaches with time tracking and strange note durations). Note about Point 10 : good thing that Ultimate Guitar checks for full bars : you won't be able to submit incomplete tab !
    DarthTyrannus83
    Good points. Ive never bothered with multi-voice drum editing, but i should try, not sure about the easier to read part, since the other voice is greyed out, but time tracking/note duration is a headache indeed. Point 10 probably shoudlve worder that better too, i was mainly referring to the incorrect song structures/bar durations/rhythms that some people just dont bother correcting.
    killergege
    For the voices, there are 5 buttons, 4 that display a specific voice with others greyed out, they could be considered as "edit mode" and one that displays all the voices in black, nothing greyed out, which could be considered as "read mode".  With the stems in the right direction (GP6 is not really good at that, you sometimes have to manually fix those), this makes the drum tab much easier to read !
    DarthTyrannus83
    I should really check that out, i only tried multi-voice for some guitars, but found it to be not worth it. Thanks for good suggestion!
    VariousThings
    There's no such thing as "adapting" a song to a more common tuning/guitar type (eg writing a 7-string song tab for a 6-string guitar), everything should be as true to the original as possible. 
      I disagree with this; I think it's OK to alter the arrangement in ways that make it more accessible to people learning. For example, adding an extra track with standard tuning equivalents of the song's main riffs and hooks; and in songs that have only lead guitar parts with no rhythm guitar part, I find it helpful when people notate the chords that are implied by the lead and bass parts. However, ideally if you do this, these changes should always be labelled as being different from the original recording to explain why they're there, and they should be placed on extra tracks that are muted. 
    DarthTyrannus83
    Agreed, thats the only acceptable way for me, and i never do that personally. Imo, any guitarist should expect to alter his tuning if hes that into playing and learning songs.
    UmbraMachina
    Another HUGE thing I keep seeing is incorrect usage of note lengths and ties. Depending on the time signature, notes will require different displays of length (dotted vs tied) based on its position in the measure.
    DarthTyrannus83
    Thats also what i meant with the 10th point. A lot of tabbers also screw up pauses/breaks in the song, either by not using the correct note/pause length values or by not counting the beats and not applying the necessary empty bars.
    deathx88
    Tip 15: STOP UPLOADING GPX FILES! Be kind and convert for the people who use GP5, since most of the converting sites are disappearing. Tip 16: DON'T USE DRUMKIT 16 or 24. They sound like dog shit! This mostly pertains to GP5 with MIDI, it's so horrendous. Why does anyone think those kits sound good?
    DarthTyrannus83
    What about getting with the times and upgrading to GP7? Besides, you can always ask for a gp5 converted version in the comments.
    deathx88
    I eventually will try 7. But GP5 was better that 6 and it seems a majority of people still think 5 is better than 7 as well. The UI still looks out of place, no reason to fix what isn't broken. And there's really no reason to upload gpx in the first place, since I know 6 can convert, and people are just separating their tabs from the vast amount of gp5 users. Also, asking in the comments to convert never works either.
    NirvanaDevil
    My main difficulty transcribing a song with GP is when 2 (or more) notes start at the same time (so common staff) but do not have the same duration. It seems to me that it's not possible or you have to write 2 tracks instead of one. Am I wrong or does someone have the solution?
    Cynamin
    You can use a "hold" to hold one note longer than the other.  So put the two notes in for the duration of the shorter one...then add a second note and use a hold on it for the remaining time on the longer one.
    Cynamin
    Tied rather...not hold.  Just seen the next post...should have read before I posted!
    NirvanaDevil
    Yes ; good idea. I tried and it seems to work... Thanks! how didn't I think of it before?
    steventhomas198
    You can do multiple voicings as if it were for classical guitar. On GP5 you can only have two which can be a little frustrating, then you have to tie notes together, but this may have increased in later GP versions.
    DarthTyrannus83
    Do you mean 2 separate guitars or just a chord with different note durations within? If its the former, use 2 separate guitar tracks, if the latter, use "let ring" or "tied note" functions (the latter is better imo, less note bleed and more control over what you write, though it depends on the specific case).
    selkayann
    Disagree with tip 6. Sometimes you can't rely just on automation to express different qualities of the same track. Take for example the image you used for the article! Although I must say I didn't know the double-click volume trick. Sounds useful!
    DarthTyrannus83
    That header image was added by the UG editors, i certainly wouldnt include a LZ tab screenshot in an article that has examples with After the Burial tabs and not being a fan of LZ either. Other than that, i agree that #6 is the weakest/worst worded point.