The Guide To Writing Technical Death Metal. Part 2

A more in-depth look at Tech Death. I will discuss chords, common scales, lyrical themes, and more.

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Here we go again!

Tech-Death is all about the technicality of the music. That's why you find tapping, sweeping, legato, alternate picking, and sweep-tapping everywhere. These are very difficult and technical techniques to master. One thing that is very distinct in Tech-death is the odd and unusual chords and arpeggios used.

Chords!

You might find this somewhere:

    Gdim A#dim   C#dim    Edim\r\nD|---------------------------------------------------------------|\r\nA|---------------------------------------------------------------|\r\nF|---------------------------------------------------------------|\r\nC|-----7-----10-------13------4----------------------------------|\r\nG|---6-----9-------12-------3------------------------------------|\r\nD|-5-----8------11--------2--------------------------------------|
These are diminished arpeggios with the 3rd omitted. These give a very eerie, and dissonant sound to your music. They are used pretty often. Back in Medieval times, composers would be killed because of the tritone (diminished fifth) association with Satan. Brutal. A diminished chord looks like this:
      Gdim
d|----------------------------------------------------------------|
A|----------------------------------------------------------------|
F|----5-----------------------------------------------------------|
C|----7-----------------------------------------------------------|
G|----6-----------------------------------------------------------|
D|----5-----------------------------------------------------------|
You might also find Augmented chords and arpeggios:(augmented is indicated by +)
     E+          F+          G+
d|---------------------------------------------------------------|
A|---------------------------------------------------------------|
F|---------4-----------5-----------6-----------------------------|
C|-------5---5-------6---6-------7---7---------------------------|
G|-----6-------6---7-------7---8-------8-------------------------|
D|---3-----------4-----------5-----------5-----------------------|
They also sound eerie and dissonant. Because Tech-death has some jazz mixed in, you will also find m7, dim7, and more things like that:
   Gm7     Gdim7     Common Dim7 riff      Gsus2        Gsus4
d|------------------------------------------------------5--------|
A|------------------------------------------------------5--------|
F|-5-------5------------------5-------------------------7--------|
C|-5-------4--------------4-7--------------9------------7--------|
G|-7-------6----------3-6------------------7------------7--------|
D|-5-------5--------5----------------------5------------5--------|
These are some common chords in tech-death. I'd suggest use sweep picked arpeggios of these, or tapped arpeggios. Scales! Tech-death uses very exotic scales that tend to give an eastern or Egyptian feel, but this is my favorite and is the most common one used (in my opinion):
The Harmonic Minor Scale or Mohammeden Scale
d|------------------------------5-7-8----------------------------|
A|------------------------5-6-9----------------------------------|
F|--------------------5-7----------------------------------------|
C|--------------6-7-9--------------------------------------------|
G|--------5-7-8--------------------------------------------------|
D|--5-7-8--------------------------------------------------------|
It gives off the Eastern feel at the 6th to 7th note jump. This is called the augmented second. If you recall the Gdim7 riff up there, you'll notice that on each string, the jump is 3 semitones. That is an augmented second. There is another scale commonly used (Necrophagist comes to mind):
Phrygian Dominant(fifth mode of the Harmonic Minor scale) or Spanish Gypsy
d|-----------------------------5-6-9-----------------------------|
A|-----------------------5-6-8-----------------------------------|
F|-------------------6-7-----------------------------------------|
C|-------------5-7-8---------------------------------------------|
G|-------5-7-8---------------------------------------------------|
D|-5-6-9---------------------------------------------------------|
Again, it sounds very Egyptian. If you have time, you should look up more modes of the Harmonic Minor scale. You might recognize these next two:
  Locrian
d|-----------------------------2-3-5-----------------------------|
A|-----------------------1-3-5-----------------------------------|
F|-------------------2-4-----------------------------------------|
C|-------------2-4-5---------------------------------------------|
G|-------2-3-5---------------------------------------------------|
D|-2-3-5---------------------------------------------------------|
The 7th mode of the major scale is Locrian. It can give a very diminished, dark feeling if used on the rhythm. There are plenty of articles on UG about modal playing. Check them out sometime.
   The Natural Minor Scale
d|-----------------------------3-5-6-----------------------------|
A|-----------------------3-4-6-----------------------------------|
F|-------------------3-5-----------------------------------------|
C|-------------3-5-7---------------------------------------------|
G|-------3-5-6---------------------------------------------------|
D|-3-5-6---------------------------------------------------------|
You've definitely heard this one before. This is one of the most common scales in all music. Lyrical Themes Often in Tech-death, they write about space, time, life, death, war, politics, et cetera. I personally just growl gibberish and when the chorus comes I start making words more pronounced. Obviously, don't do that. I'd say, if you want to start writing tech death lyrics, start reading them. I love Obscura so all my songs have lyrics about space stuff. If you like a band that writes about war, and you have a similar point of view, write about war, but don't copy them. Analyze and Apply. A Short List of Technical Death Metal Bands That Are Notable: Death- They pretty much founded the genre. Atheist- One of the founders of the genre. Cynic-Two ex-members of Death, and interesting vocals. Necrophagist- One of the most known and famous. Obscura- Pretty much a tech death super group. Two ex-members of Necrophagist, member of Pestilence, one member of Spawn of Possession. Decapitated- Famous Tech Death band. Notable. Origin- Notable. An influence in a lot of Death Metal. Pestilence- Pretty famous. I hope you enjoyed this lesson on writing Technical Death Metal! Davey P is a 13 year old technical death metal writer. He has been playing for about 6 years. He was raised on heavy metal, but evolved into more darker metal.

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    Emenius Sleepus
    basically everything that Wildchild just said, you should write down, memorise and worship. I admire the courage and ambition of this article -but little else that has to do with it. Being famous usually has little to do with being good. Not saying that both can't be present in the same place at the same time, just that they aren't relying on each other to exist. The technique isn't the aim of metal, it's purely coincidental. Feel, on the other hand, is critical, - and writing in such a way as to develop musical theme rather than just throw together "exotic" bits, is one of the aspects of quality.
    xXSlipknotfanXx
    My favorite tech-death is Fleshgod Apocalypse hands down. If you don't know them you gotta check them out. And thank you for this, it should come in handy.
    carnagereap666
    If I write another article, I'll have section on linking riffs together. But I do think Demilich is bad. I hate the vocals. They remind me of Torso**** which is grindcore. But Necrophagist and Obscura are pretty much what tech-death is. Fast licks, odd chords, blast beats, fast double bass, the use of exotic scales, and more. Necrophagist is probably one of the most famous modern tech-death bands.
    carnagereap666
    Not in technical death metal. I'm not saying it doesn't have feeling because it does, but it's not my job to tell you how to play music with feeling. That's up to the player. Tech-death is all about the technicality of the pieces played. Therefore, you should learn how to perform the technical part of the songs. The sweeping, the tapping, the fast picking, the odd rhythms, and the unique chords. It is all up to YOU to put the feeling in the music, but you should do it with while mixing technicality in with it. Sure, fast playing and super locrian diminished 7th flatted 13th chords are technical and make your music more interesting, but I think that people often forget that they should probably put feeling in their music. Whether it be country, blues, pop, punk, or rock.
    Zeppelin Addict
    As far as I see there is nothing hostile about "You forgot the part about good songwriting." Especially if it is something you didn't touch on and should be important information in "The Guide to WRITING techdeath metal". Be a bigger man and don't take it personally. You're on the internet, you have no idea the tone he took with you while saying that, you only assume he was attacking you. You probably think I'm attacking you right now when in fact I am sitting here carefully choosing my words to be as inoffensive as possible.. You are right I can't deny tech-death is about technicality. BUT it isn't ALL about technicality. That is one of few problems I had with your article. Like I said "Techniques of Technical Death Metal"
    carnagereap666 wrote: It gives insight on techniques used and chords and scale that are found. It's as simple as that.
    Which seems to be what you said right here.. Whether it seems like it or not I'm only trying to help you out.. The internet is ageless, nobody cares that you're 13, nobody will treat you like you're 13 so be prepared to take the criticism and try to learn from it, it will make your articles that much better in the future.
    carnagereap666
    Well, as I said before, it's up to the musician to put his emotion in music. I can't say in this article: "Tech-death evokes sorrow feeling" because that may not be true. Certain songs evoke certain emotions. But I don't think I have a problem accepting critique. I only write hostile things if someone writes something that doesn't provide any ways to make the article better, or explain why something is wrong. If you notice, anyone who gave me legitimate criticism was responded to in a positive way. It's only the smartass comments like, "You forgot the part about good songwriting." That make me respond even remotely negatory. If Wildchild had put: You list some techniques, but it didn't really explain how to use it in a song properly and you only describe how to play Obscura type metal. But I don't like them!" I would have been fine and would have responded like this: "Well, I assume people know how to use things. That's probably a poor assumption though. I also made it based off techniques that I found most common in tech-death. I wasn't biased towards any one band except Obscura." And everything would've been fine. I keep an open mind when it comes to music theory, but when there is no evidence to support a claim I assume it's wrong, or I'll research it myself. You can't deny that tech-death isn't about the technicality. Obviously feeling and emotion should be put in the mix as well when writing a song. But how do I explain how to put feeling into a song. That's up to the musician, not the teacher. I'm sorry if you don't like the article. It is meant to appeal to new-comers of the genre who just heard the song Stabwound or Lack of Comprehension and want to play that style. It gives insight on techniques used and chords and scale that are found. It's as simple as that.
    Zeppelin Addict
    Gotta agree with Wildchild and Emenius...
    Emenius Sleepus wrote: The technique isn't the aim of metal, it's purely coincidental. Feel, on the other hand, is critical, - and writing in such a way as to develop musical theme rather than just throw together "exotic" bits, is one of the aspects of quality.
    Especially this. Technicality in music was born from classical and jazz, there are few differences in the basics from metal.. You ask ANY composer or jazz virtuoso, they will tell you the same thing over and over again. Music is always about feel, channeling emotion, allowing the listener to experience those emotions. As a musician you are successful when you manage to do this. Obviously there are many ways about going about this. The Beatles and AC/DC have written some of the most simple songs that still stand tall today because they channel feelings that the listener can relate to. This goes for all music, don't be thinking tech death is an exception. ALL music is made to make you feel something. The technical aspects are merely a way for a musician to express what emotions they want expressed.. Sweep picking and tapping are the same as simple chord changes. Techniques. If this article were to be called "Techniques of Technical Death Metal" I would be all for it and wouldn't have a single problem.. However, you losing sight of this combined with you're nasty habit to not be able to accept any critique has prompted this response from me. Keep this in mind carnage. If you think you're always right, you'll never learn anything.
    The Wildchild
    carnagereap666 wrote:Give some critique. Tell me how to make it better.
    Okay, how about you include a part on how to string riffs together such that it expands on a single theme and becomes a coherent (meaningful!) song rather than "oh put diminished scales and weird chords and become tech deff lololol"... then again, you just called Demilich bad and worship Necrophagist and Obscura... There might just be no hope for you. PS: Chromatic passages are pretty much the meat and potatoes of death metal. What you describe as technical "death metal" is basically a heavier (and shittier) variant of jazz fusion (actually I would suggest that you focus on jazz fusion instead since you probably would like that more than metal). Ta-ta
    carnagereap666
    Senor Kristian wrote: The point of technical death metal is tothink outside the box, yet here you are extablishing the box for technical death metal. I don't get it.
    I'm just supplying techniques, scales, chords, and some general info. Think outside the box using the information I gave.
    carnagereap666
    That's true, but with such a massive genre, I covered the basis for writing YOUR OWN tech-death songs with common elements I've found in a lot of bands.
    qrEE
    I mean, even Cryptopsy's "Once Was Not" needs it's own separate guide, as the album sounds like nobody else's in the entire genre.
    qrEE
    Sorry, but a guide to Technical Death Metal is moot, because Technical Death Metal is not a distinct sound, but many different sounds incorporated into one. Unfortunately, many things of which you described apply to Deathcore, which is an entirely different, and far inferior genre. Death, for example, has almost NOTHING to do with what you mentioned, as they typically use none of those scales or modes. Atheist also commonly plays entirely separate from a scale, and their riffs can best be described as "chromatic". What about Cryptopsy? Their early music sounds nothing like the type of music you describe to write, but they are Technical Death Metal. Nile is Technical Death Metal, and they more appropriately fit what you write. But it's just such a huge genre with so many different styles of bands in it, it's impossible to explain so simply. This guide would be better called "The guide to writing Necrophagist style Technical Death Metal", as the guide teaches next to nothing of how to write Death, Cynic, Atheist, Cryptopsy, or Gorguts, which are all very important in the genre.
    The Wildchild
    carnagereap666 wrote: Is that so? Where is your article? Where is your guide to writing music? I don't see it. Please elaborate on how this article is in anyway bad. Otherwise, just leave because no one cares about your opinion or your terrible band that has zero stage presence. Thanks for the comment!
    This article was written to serve as a guide to writing technical death metal music, but it fails at that not only because writing metal cannot be translated into mere numbers, techniques, or what have you, but also because it cites terrible "tech death" bands as examples (such as Necrophagist, Obscura, who just throw flashy passages into a big heap of crap without any notion of coherent songwriting and musical development). Remember kids, metal is about feel, not technique.
    carnagereap666
    The Wildchild wrote: carnagereap666 wrote: Is that so? Where is your article? Where is your guide to writing music? I don't see it. Please elaborate on how this article is in anyway bad. Otherwise, just leave because no one cares about your opinion or your terrible band that has zero stage presence. Thanks for the comment! This article was written to serve as a guide to writing technical death metal music, but it fails at that not only because writing metal cannot be translated into mere numbers, techniques, or what have you, but also because it cites terrible "tech death" bands as examples (such as Necrophagist, Obscura, who just throw flashy passages into a big heap of crap without any notion of coherent songwriting and musical development). Remember kids, metal is about feel, not technique.
    Writing music is all about letting your creativity to shine. You say metal is all about feel and not technique. Well, you need technique to play the guitar and write music. You can't just take some gentleman off the street and tell him to play something with feeling. He has to learn techniques, chords, scales, and all that good stuff. In reality, metal is 60% feel, 40% technique. Besides, the point of TECHNICAL death metal is to be technical with the music. Use odd chords, use unique scales, try complex rhythms, think outside the box. You say metal can't be translated to numbers and techniques. You're wrong. It has to be otherwise no one could learn the goddamn genre. Again, if you think my article fails at serving as a guide, write your own. Also, Necrophagist and Obscura are not terrible examples. They are perfect examples of what tech-death is all about. Technicality. And if you think they just throw "flashy passages into a big heap of crap without any notion of coherent song writing and musical development." You clearly don't appreciate good music and do not deserve to write your own songs because if you can't see the feeling and emotion that goes into some of their songs, then don't listen to tech-death.
    carnagereap666
    That is a terrible song IMO. But anyway if you think you can make a better guide writing what you call "coherent death metal songs." Then what's stopping you? By the way, I honestly don't think I can classify that has tech-death. There's nothing different in the riffs. Just the same two over and over again. There is practically no scale being followed (Maybe the chromatic), there are no chords being used, no technicality in this besides the drums which are following a quick fill then a simple beat then later they start doing blasts. Technical Death Metal has roots in jazz. I don't see any of that in this. Just two or three riffs over and over. Then a mediocre solo. And it's not just a heap of irrelevant theory babble. It actually relates to the article. You're just bashing the guide for the sake of bashing the guide. Give some critique. Tell me how to make it better. Don't just say: You forgot the part about good songwriting. You go write an article on "good songwriting."
    Senor Kristian
    The point of technical death metal is tothink outside the box, yet here you are extablishing the box for technical death metal. I don't get it.
    The Wildchild
    Oh christ, you really pulled out the "you don't get it" argument, huh? How, uhh... :rolleyes: So yeah, this guide* still doesn't have anything on creating coherent death metal songs, of which this is an example:
    A final note: saying Necrophagist and Obscura are perfect examples of tech death is like saying Two and a Half Men is a perfect example of a sitcom... or that the Star Wars prequels are better than the sequels. *(it's just a heap of irrelevant theory babble after all)
    carnagereap666
    Be a bigger man and don't take it personally. You're on the internet, you have no idea the tone he took with you while saying that, you only assume he was attacking you. You probably think I'm attacking you right now when in fact I am sitting here carefully choosing my words to be as inoffensive as possible..
    I don't take it personally. I understand that Wildchild dislikes my article, and I accept that. That's his opinion, but I have every right to ask that I receive ways to make it better. Which is actual critique.
    You are right I can't deny tech-death is about technicality. BUT it isn't ALL about technicality. That is one of few problems I had with your article. Like I said "Techniques of Technical Death Metal"
    I did say it was all about technicality, but I suppose I misspoke. It is 50% Technicality, 50% Feel. But I can't put in words on the internet how to put YOUR emotion and feeling into it.
    Whether it seems like it or not I'm only trying to help you out.. The internet is ageless, nobody cares that you're 13, nobody will treat you like you're 13 so be prepared to take the criticism and try to learn from it, it will make your articles that much better in the future.
    I know you are trying to help me out. You gave actual criticism. You said I didn't give insight on writing songs with feeling. But it's hard to do that. Try writing how to put feel into songs. I know no one cares that I'm thirteen. I don't expect it to get me some kind of awesome award for being the youngest pyroultraphrygian dominant 5th minor 1st subsidarial neo-jazz, classical player. I put that part in there to give a little info about me. So you can realize that music theory doesn't have an age limit. I can only learn from criticism if there is something to learn. "You forgot the part about good songwritng" doesn't tell me anything besides this person doesn't like the article.
    fendercopyuser
    You managed to just turn me off with the first sentence dude haha. technique just for the sake of technique? now that's what i call really stupid
    PapaSchumpf
    carnagereap666 wrote: It takes more time and talent to play than any petty genre you think is "real music." People like you assume that death metal is just: DETUNE TO Drop A#, hit notes. More knowledge goes into making it than any other genre besides Jazz and classical, which technical death metal is mixed with. You people assume no emotion or feeling goes into making it. But you're dead wrong. Bob Dylan is terrible and so are the Outlaws. GTFO.
    Sorry man, I didnt intend to raise the tempers like that. It was more of a joke, since I just dont understand how you could write music about death all the time ... but ok thats your problem and just some advice: If you want to argue in a professional and convincing way don't get personal (reading my profile to see which music i like and writing an offending comment about it). But in this case it was justified due to my equally offending comment. Is the author really 13 years old? Pretty impressive, I mean with 13 years I just stopped listening to Justin Timberlake...
    Jacksonplayr100
    Stop being dicks, I thought it was pretty good. I just saw Obscura the other night opening for Children of Bodom. Awesome show!
    zerodeck
    Attack&Release wrote: Not to be picky, but the first "chord progression" you showed weren't chords. a chord is three or more different notes, and those were diminished fifths with octaves.
    Lol, then what are powerchords to you? It doesn't change a thing that there are octaves in a chord.
    carnagereap666
    I'm sorry as well. I was immature at a moment that really didn't call for it. But death metal isn't about death, it's about anything. Space, philosophy, life, robots, and more. The generalization that it is only about death is wrong. Yes, I am thirteen. I grew up in an odd environment for music. My dad was in a band and they'd practice in the house when I was a baby. It was mostly hard rock and 80's metal. So I ended up liking it. Then I started to look at different styles of metal, and currently tech-death is my favorite.
    codyblanchard15
    jesus that song wildchild posted sucks balls compared to obscura lol especially the solo, totally sounded like a major scale run lol i was looking up practice techniques cuz im struggling to learn and obscura solo (incarnated) and i see this hilarious argument lol
    ninjainvader
    Wow, very impressed that you wrote out this lesson at age 14. I don't get why people are complaining, you gave some of the common scales and chords and used some examples, it's a good lesson. Wish I knew all this at 14. I totally agree, writing tech death is very often trial and error. Having an idea of what you want to hear is good, but it even so it can take a lot of trial and error to get it to sound exactly how you want given how many octaves you can choose from, how many ways you can arrange arpeggios, mixing scales or not, harmonizing using a mix or 3rds and 5ths can be cool too, theres a lot you can do.
    carnagereap666
    Zeletros wrote: Sorry for double post, I didn't notice your absolutely ignorant comment about Bob Dylan. The guy you are replying to said an absolutely ignorant thing, while you, in return, said something even more ignorant. So I don't understand how can you feel right judging him?
    I personally don't like Bob Dylan, but if he is going to say death metal is not music, which is a stupid comment, then I'm going to say Bob Dylan is terrible. It's personal preference. But saying DM is not music is a direct attack to something millions of people like. So I tend to get a little defensive.
    Gitaarbanaan wrote: Lol I just see a lot of 'I only respond hostile to hostile comments' after I read comments that I agree 100% with, and that contain a good amount of advice and expertise...way to go kiddo :p
    There is a difference between a hostile comment and a criticism comment. Something that states the bad and gives ways to improve is a criticism comment. A comment that is a direct attack to the article and doesn't give any suggestions for improvement is a hostile comment.
    Gitaarbanaan
    Lol I just see a lot of 'I only respond hostile to hostile comments' after I read comments that I agree 100% with, and that contain a good amount of advice and expertise...way to go kiddo :p
    Necrolysis
    carnagereap666 wrote: I did say it was all about technicality, but I suppose I misspoke. It is 50% Technicality, 50% Feel. But I can't put in words on the internet how to put YOUR emotion and feeling into it.
    so much for 60/40....I'M ON TO YOU KID.
    carnagereap666
    As I said above: "You can't deny TECHNICAL DEATH METAL isn't about technicality." Of course, feeling and emotion goes into it, but you want to have the technical aspect of things included, or else you are just playing death metal, or grindcore, or something not Tech-death.
    carnagereap666
    It takes more time and talent to play than any petty genre you think is "real music." People like you assume that death metal is just: DETUNE TO Drop A#, hit notes. More knowledge goes into making it than any other genre besides Jazz and classical, which technical death metal is mixed with. You people assume no emotion or feeling goes into making it. But you're dead wrong. Bob Dylan is terrible and so are the Outlaws. GTFO.
    Zeletros
    Sorry for double post, I didn't notice your absolutely ignorant comment about Bob Dylan. The guy you are replying to said an absolutely ignorant thing, while you, in return, said something even more ignorant. So I don't understand how can you feel right judging him?
    Zeletros
    I don't think this is a really good guide on writing music, though I liked the part about musicians getting executed for playing some satanic notes(eventhough it's probably a lie)
    Bubonic Chronic
    To play "technical" death metal you need a technically proficient drummer. Syncopated time signatures, odd accents and complex fills are the signature of this style. Use of dissonance, tritones and the harmonic minor scale are common to practically all styles of metal. With tech death the use of traditional chords is difficult because of the harmonic "space" a chord takes up. Single notes and perfect fifths or major/minor thirds are much more effectively used against complex drumming, especially with a lot of distortion. If you want to play tech death, then take some drum lessons!
    carnagereap666
    I suppose you are right. But when there is no criticism, only an insult, I think I have the right to insult them.
    sebediah
    it's a diminished 7th. (double flat 7th.) a flat 7th is just a minor seventh. although we do refer to the 'locrian' m7b5 chord as half diminished ( 1 b3 b5 b7) where the full diminished chord is 1 b3 b5 bb7. which is still just a 6th, but as i stated earlier, you give intervals their names according to their importance in a chord. m6(b5) is alot more confusing than just dim7 though yeah, your first Gdim chord would be mainly just a m(b5) as your voicing goes 1 b5 1 b3. though you made no mention of dim7 so it's kind of a grey area. would be clearer to simply label your chord Gm(b5) as for your Gdim7. the notes would be 3423 (R b5 bb7 b3). if you didn't know it, try it. evil in a chord XD move it up in minor thirds and you've got that sinister organ from horror flicks. the gdim7 you wrote is actually a GmM7b5 (G minor major7th flat 5. 1 b3 b5 7) which as eerie as it sounds, isn't as sinister as a full fledged diminished. give the kid a break! or at least outline why he's wrong at some parts. the general idea of tech death is there. i guess being a teacher i feel more inclined to give him a hand than just plain say he's wrong
    Flibo
    MaXiMuse wrote: Dim chords have a flattend 7th, so every chord with 'dim' behind is completely wrong. Sorry, but if you are going to post an article to be read by millions get your theory straight...
    Am I missing something here? Dim7 chords have a diminished seventh which is enharmonic to major sixth. He gets that right with the Gdim7. A dim chord by itself doesn't even have a seventh. It does have a minor third though, but he says that it's omitted so I guess it's fine.
    MaXiMuse
    Dim chords have a flattend 7th, so every chord with 'dim' behind is completely wrong. Sorry, but if you are going to post an article to be read by millions get your theory straight...
    Myshadow46_2
    The Harmonic Minor Scale or Mohammeden Scale??? it's just harmonic minor, very common in a lot of music, it's the natural minor with a raised 7th to give it a leading tone back to the tonic. Oh and people weren't killed for using tritones.
    carnagereap666
    Myshadow46_2 : The Harmonic Minor Scale or Mohammeden Scale??? it's just harmonic minor, very common in a lot of music, it's the natural minor with a raised 7th to give it a leading tone back to the tonic. Oh and people weren't killed for using tritones.
    Mohammedan Scale is another name for the harmonic minor. Sort of like how locrian is another name for the diminished scale, and Aeolian is another name for the minor scale. They used to be punished or excommunicated for using it because it was known as being "Diabolus in Musica" which means the devil in music.
    MaXiMuse : Dim chords have a flattend 7th, so every chord with 'dim' behind is completely wrong. Sorry, but if you are going to post an article to be read by millions get your theory straight...
    My theory is straight. A diminished triad has a flattened 3rd and a flattened 5th, but a fully diminished chord which makes things a little harder to use has a 6th and a bb7th. It makes things generally easier to use with just a flat 3rd and 5th. Look it up: http://piano.about.com/od/chordskeys/a/d... http://piano.about.com/od/chordskeys/a/d...
    sebediah
    wait. scratch my GmM7b5 thinger. you've got the write chord. except you write G on the 5th fret so that threw my brain in a loop as the 4th fret is G's major 7th in standard tuning. but here's something else: even if you tune to D standard, refer to the chords on your tab as if they were in E standard. you play a Adim7. but it sounds like a G. again, less confusion! see what you did to my brain?! haha
    sebediah
    common practice is to write the chords as if they were in standard however. look at some tabs of detuned metal in guitar world and such, a silly example but metallica's sad but true in the tab book. the verse riff is written as E5 D5 E5 E5 Bb5, even though the song is tuned to D standard, the low string riff is written as an E.