25th Anniversary Of 'Appetite For Destruction' This Weekend

The classic Guns N' Roses album turns 25-years-old this weekend. Hear the original lineup talk about their memories, and why it became a global phenomenon.

25th Anniversary Of 'Appetite For Destruction' This Weekend
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Guns N' Roses "Appetite For Destruction" is officially 25 years old this weekend. Original members of the band have been weighing in with their memories of the album that has been gone platinum 18 times and sold over 30 million copies. Gn'R were inducted to the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame this year, where original members Steven Adler, Slash and Duff McKagan played three songs at the induction ceremony. Frontman Axl Rose was notably absent, after months of speculation that he would put the past behind him and join his old bandmates on stage. Speaking about the anniversary to Australian radio show "Triple M" (via Blabbermouth), Slash said it's harder for him to enjoy the album because of "all that sh-t was happening". "I don't see it as being the big record that other people see it as; I'm too close to it," Slash said. But he recognises that there was something magic about the chemistry of their early 90s lineup. "We were definitely the only five guys that could have made up that band... I don't think any of the other configurations could have possibly worked to make up what Guns N' Roses really was." So why did it end up going down in history? "The record is a basic snapshot of life going on from 1984 to 1987, and it's a very honest record," explained Slash. "I would never have thought in a million years that it was gonna be as successful as it became. Obviously, I thought we were a great band, I thought the songs were great, and I always stood behind that, but I thought we'd be more of a hard rock cult band. "I think one of the reasons [that is became iconic] is the fact that it was talking about stuff that nobody really talked about at the time, it was delivered with an attitude that was so sincere... we were living really on the edge and singing about it and people were like, 'Wow, that's pretty brutal.'" You might think that a classic record takes years to write (and perhaps "Chinese Democracy" proves otherwise). Slash says that the music at least took very little time to put together: "The songs happened so quickly, they almost wrote themselves - honestly. With Axl, I know that he was always very, very conscientious of the lyrics and might have spent some more time with the lyrics, but the actual arrangements and the music itself would come together within an hour. We might have fine-tuned some stuff later on, but we'd be playing a new song in a club after only having worked on it for a couple of hours." For those who haven't seen it, this is the original album cover which was quickly changed because retailers were put off by the robot rapist on the cover:
Here's a video of drummer Steven Adler talking about why "Appetite For Destruction" became one of the most revered rock albums of all time:
Meanwhile, the modern Gn'R lineup is focusing on writing material for a new album. "We're always sort of kicking material back and forth and trying to come up with new ideas," Dizzy Reed said. "Throwing it in the big melting pot that, hopefully, will become the next Guns N' Roses record."

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    SlashWannabe1
    switch625DL wrote: "I think one of the reasons [that is became iconic] is the fact that it was talking about stuff that nobody really talked about at the time, it was delivered with an attitude that was so sincere... we were living really on the edge and singing about it and people were like, 'Wow, that's pretty brutal.'" cough... Motley Crue? cough... 1981? Damn hypocrites.
    The difference is Motley Crue were posers, they stole all their song ideas from bands on the strip and used them as their own. Only after they became famous did they actually live the way they sang about.
    IAmDanMan1
    I'll probably give it a few listens this weekend if I can pull myself away from the Tremonti album for long enough...
    Maiden95
    Such a landmark record. Can't believe it's been out for 25 years. The 5 guys should really know what a great record it is and should be very proud of it.
    PrimalScream91
    SlashWannabe1 wrote: switch625DL wrote: "I think one of the reasons [that is became iconic] is the fact that it was talking about stuff that nobody really talked about at the time, it was delivered with an attitude that was so sincere... we were living really on the edge and singing about it and people were like, 'Wow, that's pretty brutal.'" cough... Motley Crue? cough... 1981? Damn hypocrites. The difference is Motley Crue were posers, they stole all their song ideas from bands on the strip and used them as their own. Only after they became famous did they actually live the way they sang about.
    Posers eh? Axl stole his whole performance style from another singer, (Cant remember his name) Motley Crue is always the band that takes the fall for being posers. I love Guns and I love Motley but come the hell on if you wanna talk about posers you need to know your facts.
    Pit_
    Axl had a tatoo with the AFD cover. Having the rapist robot scene on his forearm would've been cooler.
    HigherThanAMile
    Axl rips of Richard Black...who ripped off Michael Monroe, and on and on and on.... It all started with Screamin' Jay Hawkins. When the video for "I put a spell on you" debuted, it scared the shit out of a lot of people. That video is awesome,
    scrymusic
    Original album cover wasnt so great as the one we got... And everytime i look at the original i think of gary nueman song.. Down in the Park.
    ken_imp
    I think we should celebrate this anniversary, even if the band is no longer with the original formation. Its just about their music, and the people who were (and still) inspired by them. They are one of my fav bands along with AC/DC and Metallica. So lets forget about all that "poser" s*** and enjoy music.
    switch625DL
    SlashWannabe1 wrote: switch625DL wrote: "I think one of the reasons [that is became iconic] is the fact that it was talking about stuff that nobody really talked about at the time, it was delivered with an attitude that was so sincere... we were living really on the edge and singing about it and people were like, 'Wow, that's pretty brutal.'" cough... Motley Crue? cough... 1981? Damn hypocrites. The difference is Motley Crue were posers, they stole all their song ideas from bands on the strip and used them as their own. Only after they became famous did they actually live the way they sang about.
    Same thing with gnr, haha
    switch625DL
    "I think one of the reasons [that is became iconic] is the fact that it was talking about stuff that nobody really talked about at the time, it was delivered with an attitude that was so sincere... we were living really on the edge and singing about it and people were like, 'Wow, that's pretty brutal.'"
    cough... Motley Crue? cough... 1981? Damn hypocrites.
    thechaostheory
    Anyone else find it interesting that Izzy Straldin is never (normally) included in this list of the band at Rock and Roll Hall Of Fame? I mean, the articles normally just say " Slash, Duff, and Alder played at the induction, while Axl refused to show" Pretty sweet cover. Shoulda kept that and just said "f**k the retailers!" Great album! I love every song on it, they all have a great groove and energy in them. Fav song? All of them \m/. .\m/
    FERAL1975
    PrimalScream91 wrote: SlashWannabe1 wrote: switch625DL wrote: "I think one of the reasons [that is became iconic] is the fact that it was talking about stuff that nobody really talked about at the time, it was delivered with an attitude that was so sincere... we were living really on the edge and singing about it and people were like, 'Wow, that's pretty brutal.'" cough... Motley Crue? cough... 1981? Damn hypocrites. The difference is Motley Crue were posers, they stole all their song ideas from bands on the strip and used them as their own. Only after they became famous did they actually live the way they sang about. Posers eh? Axl stole his whole performance style from another singer, (Cant remember his name) Motley Crue is always the band that takes the fall for being posers. I love Guns and I love Motley but come the hell on if you wanna talk about posers you need to know your facts.
    Davy Jones from The Monkees
    GenerationKILL
    switch625DL wrote: SlashWannabe1 wrote: switch625DL wrote: "I think one of the reasons [that is became iconic] is the fact that it was talking about stuff that nobody really talked about at the time, it was delivered with an attitude that was so sincere... we were living really on the edge and singing about it and people were like, 'Wow, that's pretty brutal.'" cough... Motley Crue? cough... 1981? Damn hypocrites. The difference is Motley Crue were posers, they stole all their song ideas from bands on the strip and used them as their own. Only after they became famous did they actually live the way they sang about. Same thing with gnr, haha
    GNR lived like the maniacs they performed and sung like LONG before they became famous. Infact, GNR was more "street" and "punk" than they were given credit for. Becoming egotistical rockstars ruined their sound and vibe the minute they signed a contract and were put in the studio to record anything after their first major album. Everyone close to the band even acknowledges this. GNR were never ment to explode like they did, they were a trashy street band that were corrupted like greed. The way they lived is a completely different story, for one thing, they all lived out of a rented storage unit for months at a time and Izzy was a well known heroin dealer that was supplying everyone into it on the strip. Infact, when they were finally put up in a house together by Geffen records, they sent a guy there to mind their business who was the same person who handled Motley Crue years before. Only this time, the guy was completely terrified of GNR and the people they attracted or hung out with. All of these FACTS can be read about in ANY of the numerous GNR biographys, or even the Slash one. GNR were WAY WAY WAY more extreme when it came to excess than ANY other band to come out of LA during that scene. Motley Crue had its 1 or 2 misfits, but ALL of GNR was ****ed up.
    lVlaniac
    Maiden95 wrote: Such a landmark record. Can't believe it's been out for 25 years. The 5 guys should really know what a great record it is and should be very proud of it.
    I guess they all are proud of it in their own special way and they are also very comfortable about it but when i think of Axl's side i just think he doesnt want to be stereotyped into that album if you know what i mean. Im not a big fan and some people will remember "Appetite for Destruction" but ill remember "Chinese Democracy" more. Anyways, ill go and play Appetite now
    switch625DL
    PrimalScream91 Posers eh? Axl stole his whole performance style from another singer, (Cant remember his name) Motley Crue is always the band that takes the fall for being posers. I love Guns and I love Motley but come the hell on if you wanna talk about posers you need to know your facts.
    The singer you're talking about is Richard Black from Shark Island. Axl ripped his moves from him. Shark Island released records like in 1981, and there's a vid on youtube when Axl joins them on stage before in 1986. GnR is nothing but a bunch of posers and ripoffs.
    Petey D
    AfD is the best hard rock album of all time imo. It was the only thing I listened to for a year striaght, maybe more. I wore out my Vinyl copy, and the five or six cassette copies I made of it. I'm on my third CD version of it now, and it still gets regular play in the rotation, and a track or two from it is on pretty much all of my playlists. Afd was a life changing album for a lot of people, myself included. As far as the "poser" argument goes, I don't think The Crue or GnR are poser bands. If you want to talk about poser bands, then start with Poison.