At The Drive-In And Refused Officially Reform

Two of the most significant acts of all time have officially reunited to play the Coachella festival in 2012.

logo
Ultimate Guitar
4

At The Drive-In and Refused, two of the most significant rock acts of their era, have both reformed after more than a decade apart. They will both perform at the Coachella festival this year.

At The Drive-In, famed for their wildly kinetic live shows, left fans stunned last night when a cryptic tweet suggested their reformation (view it below).

The tweet was later confirmed when the line-up for Coachella was announced, proving that the band really had settled their disputes and would perform again. A new website with a teaser video and their Coachella dates also appeared online.

The post-hardcore pioneers parted ways in 2001 amid intense media hype, some of which claimed they were "the next Nirvana". Their final album, "Relationship Of Command", was a huge commercial success and was credited with bringing post-hardcore to the mainstream. Singer Cedric Bixler and guitarist Omar Rodriguez went on to form progressive rock act The Mars Volta, while the remaining members founded the alternative rock group Sparta.

ATTENTION !To whom it may concern:AT THE DRIVE-IN will be breaking their 11 year silenceTHIS STATION IS NOWOPERATIONAL

At The Drive-In (@AtTheDriveIn_) January 9, 2012

The reunion has left some fans questioning their motives, considering comments made by The Mars Volta members during their hiatus which suggested they would only reform for the money. Bixler responded to these claims on his YouTube page:

"I can see how many of you would think we only might be in it for the money, but people change," he said. "I'm going to have the time of my life. What kind of artist would I be if I didn't contradict myself?"

Seemingly by coincidence, hardcore punk legends Refused also announced their reformation yesterday after splitting in 1998. While the timing of their announcement left them in the shadow of At The Drive-In, it remains a significant moment in rock:

"Finally, after a decade and a half hiatus, Kristofer picked up the guitar again. Which made David want to play the drums again. Which in turn led to all four of us suddenly making new music in assorted constellations. As all this was brewing, Coachella got in touch.

"We never did 'The shape of punk to come' justice back when it came out, too tangled up in petty internal bickering to really focus on the job. And suddenly there's this possibility to do it like it was intended. We wanna do it over, do it right. For the people who've kept the music alive through the years, but also for our own sakes."

So two of the greatest modern punk bands reform in one day, shortly after news that Black Sabbath and Van Halen will release new albums. Who says rock is dead?

19 comments sorted by best / new / date

    Mr Pringle
    UGtom wrote: goths were officially replaced with 'emus' - kids dressed in black, with little understanding of their real musical heritage.
    I for one would love to see goths replaced with emus, seeing Australia's largest bird getting down at a marilyn manson concert would be hilarious.
    UGtom
    Just saw that it doesn't say 'two of the most significant punk acts' - not sure if I submitted that or not but it's not there. To summarise, they were among the most significant punk acts of all time. Hope that clears this up.
    jacobdubya
    I've never listened to Refused, but I do agree with At The Drive-In being one of the greatest bands of their era. They may not be one of the most well-known bands of that time, but certainly one of the most influential. Like UGtom said, they were pretty much the band that helped bring post-hardcore/emo to the mainstream, giving rise to bands like Thursday, The Used, etc. And of course, The Mars Volta came out of ATDI's split. The Stooges and the Velvet Underground weren't very well-known in their time either, but they ended up being very influential to the rise of punk rock. When I first heard "One Armed Scissor" after it came out, it was unlike anything I'd ever heard before. I didn't like it much at first, but after it grew on me, ATDI became one of my favorite bands. I spent much of my teenage years listening to bands like them and many of the past-hardcore/emo bands that came out in their wake, and I also backtracked and discovered a lot of great bands like Sunny Day Real Estate and Fugazi because of ATDI. So I owe a lot to them.
    kLeft
    SGofawesome wrote:I'm with you on this one, for I have never heard of either of the bands.
    Why are you here, then? Trollas gunna troll.
    wursty
    IMO At The Drive-In had a major influence on a lot of bands in the past decade. Even though some people never heard of them, they still helped shape/pioneer post-hardcore music. If anyone buys CDs still, take a look in the back of the books and you might find a thank you to ATDI and/or Refused. If I remember correctly, Thursday had one to ATDI in either Full Collapse or War all the time.
    UGtom
    I have to disagree. Refused became the template for every anti-grunge loud/quiet band afterwards, and ATDI literally spearheaded the emo revival. Once ATDI had their big hit, the labels were leaping all over post-hardcore. Sadly, it killed the genre and the likes of Finch and My Chemical Romance were the result. However, the music world changed and goths were officially replaced with 'emus' - kids dressed in black, with little understanding of their real musical heritage. Therefore, they had a huge impact (alright, refused I could give or take by ATDI were game changers), one of the biggest bands of 2000/2001, and a defining emo/post-hardcore act. That's why I wrote the teaser line the way I did. That, and to draw people in who might be too young to know what they were about.
    im not mental
    i put this on the coachella article before i saw this, but... at the drive in's station is now operational and refused aren't ****in' dead!
    btfbonzo
    Refused back together. I must be dreaming. Hopefully I don't wake up.
    Stretch_Wilson
    slaveskinJACKET wrote: Sorry, but you could argue that either one of these bands were even that significant in their era (as the article states), but there is no debate as to whether they're two of the most significant bands of all time (as the teaser under the headline states). A good way to measure something's significance is to completely remove it, and note whether it makes a difference. How does their presence compare to their non-presence? Those genres/the music industry/the world was practically the same both before and after these bands' existence, as well as during. The only major signicance to either of these bands' existence is that The Mars Volta would probably not have existed otherwise. Therefore, they've had little impact. Therefore, they're not the most significant bands of their era/genre. Therefore, they're not the most significant bands of all time. There's nothing wrong with them. I just don't see the point in going around, telling people that a sparrow is a bald eagle.
    You'd be stupid to think this as they were bands before their era's and still continue to shape the minds of young musicians around the world. To say they are not significant is utterly idiotic as for one the post-hardcore/punk scene would not be as popular today without these two bands as they were the bridge for fans of rock into heavier music. Please get your head out of your arse one day soon mate.
    slaveskinJACKET
    Lol. Goths turned into emus. I still can't jump on-board with calling them two of the most significant punk acts of all time, but they definitely fit better into that category than just a broad sweep of all artists, ever. For clarity, the teaser on the news page says, "two of the most significant acts of all time," and the article starts out as, "two of the most significant rock acts of their era." The second one is much, much, much, much, much more plausible, although still a quite bit of a stretch, in my eyes.
    SGofawesome
    slaveskinJACKET wrote: Lol. Goths turned into emus. I still can't jump on-board with calling them two of the most significant punk acts of all time, but they definitely fit better into that category than just a broad sweep of all artists, ever. For clarity, the teaser on the news page says, "two of the most significant acts of all time," and the article starts out as, "two of the most significant rock acts of their era." The second one is much, much, much, much, much more plausible, although still a quite bit of a stretch, in my eyes.
    I'm with you on this one, for I have never heard of either of the bands.
    slaveskinJACKET
    Sorry, but you could argue that either one of these bands were even that significant in their era (as the article states), but there is no debate as to whether they're two of the most significant bands of all time (as the teaser under the headline states). A good way to measure something's significance is to completely remove it, and note whether it makes a difference. How does their presence compare to their non-presence? Those genres/the music industry/the world was practically the same both before and after these bands' existence, as well as during. The only major signicance to either of these bands' existence is that The Mars Volta would probably not have existed otherwise. Therefore, they've had little impact. Therefore, they're not the most significant bands of their era/genre. Therefore, they're not the most significant bands of all time. There's nothing wrong with them. I just don't see the point in going around, telling people that a sparrow is a bald eagle.
    kLeft
    Niiiiice. Mars Volta needs a break anyways. Just hoping for an elaborate tour schedule from both camps!
    Acacia69
    "The Shape of Punk to Come" is one of the best albums I have ever listened to.