Doctor Acquitted of Involuntary Manslaughter of Slipknot's Paul Gray

Doctor Daniel Baldi was also acquitted of six other counts of involuntary manslaughter.

Doctor Acquitted of Involuntary Manslaughter of Slipknot's Paul Gray
21
A doctor has been acquitted of the involuntary manslaughter of Slipknot's Paul Gray.

AsĀ NME notes, Doctor Daniel Baldi of Des Moines, Iowa, was standing trial for his part in Gray's death in 2010 and the deaths of six others, but was acquitted of the charges on May 1. The jury deliberated for two days, stating that they could not find him guilty of reckless behaviour and writing prescriptions that lead to the seven deaths, reports the Des Moines Register.

Baldi still faces several malpractice lawsuits and also administrative charges from the Iowa Board of Medicine, who - even though he has not practiced medicine since 2012 - could suspend or revoke his medical license, adds the local news source.

Last month the court heard that late Slipknot bassist Gray spent his final weeks in a "blur" of drug abuse. Testifying at Polk County District Court, the bassist's widow, Brenna Gray, raised concerns about her husband being prescribed Xanax. She told the court: "I just knew it was his drug of choice, that he'd struggled with it. So I just wasn't really sure why he was on it, why he needed it along with the medication he was taking for addiction."

Painting a picture of her husband's final days, she said she and family members staged an intervention hoping to help Gray confront his behaviour, but Gray instead went to a local hotel, where he was found dead two days later. Brenna Gray says she did not contact the authorities for fear of being arrested for drugs kept in the house and worried that their unborn child would be taken away from them.

She said she appealed to Gray's Slipknot bandmates for help, but none was offered. "One was playing golf two minutes away from our house but couldn't come," she testified. "Nobody else cared, nobody was involved. They told me it was my problem."

38 comments sorted by best / new / date

comments policy
    Clever Sleazoid
    Interesting, the bandmates couldn't help? Thats interesting, considering the intense mourning they said they went through. Perhaps it was guilt, but where's this freakin' brotherhood thing they've preached about? I love Slipknot, but damn...
    vikkyvik
    You cannot help someone who doesn't want to help themselves. Simple fact of life when it comes to addictions.
    ryanbwags
    Don't blame the rest of the band here. How long did they try to help Paul? It doesn't say that. People who have addictions will never get clean unless they want to. Who says the rest of the band didn't try like hell to get him clean? There's a point where you realize nothing you are doing is helping him. How hard do you keep trying?
    tomyo117
    good point, they might of tried loads before but got fed up with it, which seems unlikley because the res of the band refered to him as their 'brother'
    MetalRock4ever
    Apparently the rest of the band did do an intervention for Gray. But it was Gray's actions that led to his death, not the bands altogether. You can only help some people to a some extent: if they don't want help, what can you do?
    SevenTen
    What would they have really been able to do thought? From what I understand from the timeline in the story, she would have been asking them to help her remove the drugs from her home so she wouldn't get arrested. That may be out of context because the articles doesn't go into more detail in that area but that's how I understood it.
    Clever Sleazoid
    Well, they may not have been able to do anything to sway Paul. But if they couldn't even be bothered to do anything? I mean, granted, as you say there's not a whole lot of context. It just seems so odd that they wouldn't help his partner, even if they wouldn't remove the drugs. But I don't know, it's such a shame dude.
    cyclonus
    She can't really blame the doc for all of Paul's issues with drugs though. A lot of the drugs he abused were ones he got himself from dealers
    bangbang!!
    You'd think that if seven of your patients die, you must be doing SOMETHING wrong, yeah?
    skyturnedred
    Yes, because it's obviously the doctor's fault if the patient takes illegal drugs with the prescription medicine.
    bangbang!!
    Yeah, but SEVEN if them? That's some awful luck to say the least
    Hamburger89
    With as many doctors as we have around the world there's bound to be one where all patients die. How about you try to imagine what it's like being a doctor. I never had my clients die because I didn't do a job perfectly and I doubt you have. If we start scaring doctors by trying to get them into prison when they fail there won't be many left. A lot of people just blame doctors because they don't like the idea that they are responsible for their lives. It's like the people who tell themselves metal made their kid commit suicide just because they don't want to admit they're not good parents.
    TheLiberation
    I have no idea what it looks like in the US, but I have much more experience with the exact opposite situation, which is doctors completely neglecting the seemingly less serious matters (as in no immediate life-threatening danger. SEEMINGLY), with terrible consequences, because they get paid a lot and are nearly untouchable by law. I'm not trying to be smarter than the court but this case looked like an exact example of this ("I'll just prescribe this guy whatever he wants, what could possibly happen"). But then, this is just what it looked like - they probably knew more about the case than me, and if it took them two days to decide, I guess they discussed it in pretty great detail.
    goochmaster15
    If the doctor knew of his drug abuse, and his history of abuse of Xanax, then yes. It IS his ****ing fault. He enabled him.
    GodzillaRAWRRR
    Enabling someone doesn't make it their fault. You could say a woman walking down an alley alone enables someone to rape her. Does that make it her fault?
    rjmeyers81
    But, there's a lot more implicit trust to a doctor than an alley way. That trust is important in the medical industry where people have to rely on the opinions of doctors. The doctors have a responsibility where as the alley is just an alley.
    tomyo117
    not if it out of 500 for example, they dident specify how many people he is a doctor for
    Ikillintel
    LOL! Our new album was inspired by my love of golf the title is 9 Iron skull crush , side A, track 1 FORE!
    zach.blackwell3
    While it's not Baldi's fault that these people abused their medications, it is his fault if he knowingly prescribed the meds to an addict. I pass no blame to anyone but myself but Baldi was well known for handing out these meds like candy, myself being one of his patients, all I had to do was say the word and I could get anything I wanted.
    BradTheBluefish
    I wish some of the bandmates had shown for the intervention, but I think they've done interventions themselves but have had enough in doing so. So sad that that was the last intervention. Even sadder that his wife is alone with his kid.