Megaupload Founder Was Hiding In Safe Room With Shotgun, Say New Zealand Police

Megaupload.com founder Kim Dotcom was arrested earlier this week after New Zealand police found him hiding in a safe room with a loaded shotgun,

Megaupload Founder Was Hiding In Safe Room With Shotgun, Say New Zealand Police
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Megaupload.com founder Kim Dotcom was arrested earlier this week (January 20) after New Zealand police found him hiding in a safe room with a loaded shotgun, according to reports. Reuters reports that Dotcom also known as Kim Schmitz was apprehended following the closure of Megaupload earlier this week, when dozens of police officers and helicopters swarmed his mansion to arrest him for copyright theft. The Wall Street Journal, meanwhile, notes that Dotcom was holding a loaded shotgun when he was arrested by police, who were forced to cut their way through electronic locks to get to his safe room. Dotcom has now been charged with operating a criminal enterprise that distributes intellectual property, while police are also said to have seized two firearms and several cars from his property. Speaking about his arrest, an official for New Zealand's Organized and Financial Crime Agency said: "Despite our staff clearly identifying themselves, Mr Dotcom retreated into the house and activated a number of electronic-locking mechanisms." Earlier this week, US federal prosecutors shut down Megaupload.com for violating piracy laws. Prosecutors claim that the service has cost copyright holders more than $500 million (320 million) in lost revenue, although Megaupload claim that they have always been diligent in dealing with any complaints regarding pirated material. The FBI later described the action against the website as being "amongst the largest criminal copyright cases ever brought by the United States" and said it would target "the misuse of a public content storage and distribution site to commit and facilitate intellectual property crime". Earlier this week, several websites including Wikipedia temporarily closed down in order to protest the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA), the proposal from US Congress which aims to thwart online piracy. Thanks for the report to NME.com.

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    Eirien
    I don't see what good closing down Megaupload will do. There are loads of other sites doing just the same thing and they'll carry on popping up faster than they can be closed down. And they will always find a way around new legislation. The only reasonable solution to piracy is to offer people a better service for a reasonable price but unfortunately, the people with the most power and influence also happen to be the greediest people in society. They will exploit you for every penny. /rant
    C0FF1NCAS3
    Biggest issue for me is that the police are upset that he locked himself in a safe room with a gun when their default method of arrest is "dozens of police officers and helicopters swarmed his mansion." Really? You shut down my site, blame me for what other people did with it, and then rather than serve me or just send two officers you bust into my home with mass police forces and helicopters. Come on, their luck he didn't go Tony Montana on them at the stairwell or something. It hardly seems justified, plus this kind of treatment assumes guilt and technically e's only been charged, he is supposed to be treated as innocent until a he has been proven guilty in court. Plus if you're going to go after a site like megaupload for something copyright infringment that does occasionally get dealt with seems like the least of your problems, the child porn and such might be a better war cry.
    tpot06
    +1 TOOLeffingTOOL wrote on 01/23/2012 - 11:20 am / quote | metalhead2475 wrote: Why is it Megaupload's fault if the users uploaded the material? Ever heard of the idea of harboring a fugitive? Or holding stolen money for someone? It's basically the same thing.
    It's hardly the same thing as those are peronal individual-to-individual circumstances. I'd say this is akin to suing Ebay because sometimes knock-off merch is sold there. Just as Ebay arent reasonably expected to catch every piece of piracy that goes on on their domain, neither should megaupload be (imo). It's all about whether their procedures to deal with such behaviour can be considered reasonable attempts to actually do so(again imo).
    Hardcoregamer16
    they have deleted stuff due copyright all the time, there was no real reason for the FBI to go to another country and arrest this guy. rapidshare must be next
    TOOLeffingTOOL
    metalhead2475 wrote: Why is it Megaupload's fault if the users uploaded the material?
    Ever heard of the idea of harboring a fugitive? Or holding stolen money for someone? It's basically the same thing.
    Minivirus2
    C0FF1NCAS3 wrote: Biggest issue for me is that the police are upset that he locked himself in a safe room with a gun when their default method of arrest is "dozens of police officers and helicopters swarmed his mansion." Really? You shut down my site, blame me for what other people did with it, and then rather than serve me or just send two officers you bust into my home with mass police forces and helicopters. Come on, their luck he didn't go Tony Montana on them at the stairwell or something. It hardly seems justified, plus this kind of treatment assumes guilt and technically e's only been charged, he is supposed to be treated as innocent until a he has been proven guilty in court. Plus if you're going to go after a site like megaupload for something copyright infringment that does occasionally get dealt with seems like the least of your problems, the child porn and such might be a better war cry.
    While you do put up a valid argument, in my mind, someone who owns the materials mentioned above (guns, electronic locks, a safe room, etc.) and no less uses them when the cops, who identified themselves, coming knocking, are aware they're guilty of something. If you're innocent, you have no reason to resist because there should be so substantial evidence of your wrong doing. If you put up any type of fight, you're well aware your dealings have been less than shady.
    Kueller917
    TOOLeffingTOOL wrote: Ever heard of the idea of harboring a fugitive? Or holding stolen money for someone? It's basically the same thing.
    Maybe so. But I wouldn't put harboring a fugitive on the same level as "operating a criminal enterprise". It's like he was dealing black market deep web sites, or hosting a child porn ring, except I don't see as much effort on cracking down on those two.
    sgwizard92
    scrymusic wrote: I wonder wonder if jodie foster was in there with him.
    I love Jodie Foster.
    tpot06
    But then again how do we now that megaupload have been doing nothing in the first place? The 'no smoke without fire' analogy has a little merit but then again it's just as likely that due to the type of money at stake, the US govt could act first and ask questions later.
    TOOLeffingTOOL
    tpot06 wrote: +1 TOOLeffingTOOL wrote on 01/23/2012 - 11:20 am / quote | metalhead2475 wrote: Why is it Megaupload's fault if the users uploaded the material? Ever heard of the idea of harboring a fugitive? Or holding stolen money for someone? It's basically the same thing. It's hardly the same thing as those are peronal individual-to-individual circumstances. I'd say this is akin to suing Ebay because sometimes knock-off merch is sold there. Just as Ebay arent reasonably expected to catch every piece of piracy that goes on on their domain, neither should megaupload be (imo). It's all about whether their procedures to deal with such behaviour can be considered reasonable attempts to actually do so(again imo).
    Very true, but if they truly had made an honest attempt to remove at least some of the pirated material I feel we would not be having this conversation. The circumstances may be different, but the idea is still if you know something bad is happening and you do nothing than you are no more innocent than the criminals.