Steve Harris: Maiden Gone In 10 Years

Iron Maiden mainman Steve Harris thinks his band may have give more years left in them but they'll be gone within ten.

Steve Harris: Maiden Gone In 10 Years
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As ClassicRockMagazine reports, Iron Maiden mainman Steve Harris thinks his band may have give more years left in them - but they'll be gone within ten. Harris reveals he has doubts about whether to take his solo album "British Lion" on the club tour he'd previously said he was thinking about. Maiden released their fifteenth studio album "The Final Frontier" in 2010. That led to speculation the band was winding down, based on comments Harris had made years earlier saying they'd make fifteen records then split. He later admitted the album title was a play on those rumours, and said the band would continue as long as they felt able. Asked by The Quietus if there's any reason they can't keep going for another decade, the bassist says: "I don't know about ten years. I think we've certainly got another five years in us - but it's hard to say. "As you get older it gets doubly hard to keep yourself fit and in shape. We do work really hard on doing that. We'd be selling ourselves and everyone else short if we didn't, so we do look after ourselves. "It does get tougher - I don't play football much any more, partly because I've had so many problems with my back that I can only play the odd match here or there. Unfortunately it's five years since I've played a full season of football and that's something that I miss a lot; but I had to make a decision. I play a lot of tennis." Harris reflects that while Maiden could once have been regarded as a band towards the heaviest end of metal, "the emergence of hardcore and extreme bands have made us sound more like the 'Moody Blues'!" "British Lion" has received both positive and negative reviews - and Harris wants to wait until a more settled response has been received before deciding whether to brave the stage fright of club shows. "I'd love to play the album live," he says. "We have to wait and see what the reaction is like first though. I never take anything for granted. "I can imagine that once you step outside the Maiden comfort zone, you don't know what to expect. I still do get a little bit nervous at the beginning of Maiden tours, mainly because of the new material. We'll have rehearsed, but you can rehearse until the cows come home and the first few shows will always be a little bit rusty. Once you're confident it doesn't matter so much. "I used to get more worried years ago with Maiden about whether people were going to turn up or not. It's different now. I may not expect every single show to sell out and I never take everything for granted, but you still know you're going to get a certain amount of people." The thought pushes his mind back to Maiden's earliest days. "We did have gigs years ago where no one turned up - I'm thinking specifically of places like the Double Six in Basildon or Lafayette in Walthamstow. "At that one there were women punching each other out at the bar and we could see them clearly because there was hardly anyone else there. Just two women having a fight!" He adds: "I guess there's an element of that fear with British Lion - but that's also what's exciting about it."

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    Megadethfan245
    It's really unfortunate that a lot of bands are getting older and realizing that they can't go on forever (like Rush yesterday, and many others). But, at the same time this is just a part of their lives, and it would be mean as fans to make them go past the point where they feel like doing it. So yeah, maybe the bands only have a couple of years left but at least they gave a killer run, and might have a few great years left.
    ShockHazard
    That's sad but true. Maiden is my favorite band right now, and probably will always be. I only discovered them like 5 years ago, and summer 2010 was the first time I saw their live gig here in Finland. Hopefully they will release at least one more epic album \m/
    no_more_cheese
    I think it is best that the band know their limits and finish while on top. I've loved Iron Maiden since I first heard them and would hate to see their music suffer just to keep a few fans happy
    goingnowhere21
    Bands these days may be heavier, but few are going to have the impact on the metal world like Iron Maiden did.
    Drm316
    I may get flamed for this but ---- It's sad to say, I don't really see bands from nowadays that I would consider "good enough" (to a maiden degree) to take up the torch and carrying it on.
    Maiden95
    It's a weird subject really. We all have our favorite bands and everyone has their favorite live acts, but normally it's a group like Maiden or Rush or Priest or Sabbath or whoever, and the fact is we probably won't have any of those bands in 10 years. What will happen to the state of live rock music? That's a serious topic. People look at a band like Foo Fighters or even Metallica as torch carriers but the sad truth is that Hetfield, Ulrich, and Grohl aren't THAT MUCH younger than the guys in Maiden and Rush. Scary thoughts...
    Rimfrost
    Ive heard rumours that Kvelertak is supposed to kill live. And i have a personal favourite in band like the danish Bagdad Beat, Analogik and Taco Laco. I could imagine that they could match a band like Iron Maiden if they were given a chance at a bigger venue. But i dont know, some bands just grow legendary over time, its hard to match iron maiden or Sabbath, because they are what they are. Other bands are bound to grow into the same stature when they have been around for 30+ years. Only time will tell.
    nickzippelli
    "As ClassicRockMagazine reports, Iron Maiden mainman Steve Harris thinks his band may have give more years left in them" If Classic Rock used that exact wording they're taking lessons from UG
    arnolddrummer
    "Steve Harris thinks his band may have give more years left in them - but they'll be gone within ten." COME ON
    Drm316
    Yeah, he didn't say they'll definitively be gone in 10 years. He just said he wasn't sure about ten but certain about 5. It's a realistic answer and I think someone may just be twisting his words.
    Drm316
    And before someone takes it out of context, let me clarify that I meant that he's certain they will be around for another 5 years but not sure about 10. I didn't mean to say that he was certain they would be gone in 5.
    chdahi
    When bands like Maiden, Metallica, etc. are gone, I don't think you'll see the "flagship" type groups like we used to. Granted, there are plenty of great bands out there, but the state of music is different now than it was in the 70s, 80s, and 90s. People don't flock to the newer groups en mass like they did for bands like, Maiden, Metallica, Priest, GNR, and Rush....although I wish they did. The times are changing :/
    Face R1pper
    Don't expect anybody to replace Iron Maiden, Rush, or any of original heavy metal classics. That will only lead to disappointment. Look at the new generation of bands with an open mind, because there are plenty of great ones out there. And even if many don't yet have the abilities to compare to Iron Maiden, there are plenty that do an excellent job in continuing the legacy of 70s/80s metal.
    St00pId
    I will be very sad when that day comes and I do hope to see them a few more times before that happens.
    kiwiug
    Not trying to get any attention here or anything, but in my personal opinion Mastodon are the new flag bearers of metal...
    ihartfood
    those guys aren't too young either! love mastodon though. Testament is doing a good job bringing out some new thrash, maybe "flag bearers?" Thrash/classic metal/90s and below metal just isn't very popular these days and its difficult to keep a following, hence Steve's initial unwillingness to perform solo live.
    Jesus_Dean
    Well spoken! 1 plus point from me. Unfortunately, bands can no longer make money from only selling CD's and are forced to go on long tours. I'm sure they'll do some one-off shows/festivals and we'll just have to be alert when they do it. But otherwise, Yeah, it was fun while it lasted.
    !..!_Rock_!..!
    Maybe live rock music in massive venues is simply dying. If there is a torch bearer from the last ten years, I'd say it's Avenged Sevenfold.
    Rimfrost
    I wish they could drop the live part and just make music, id really love if they made a couple of new albums before they end it. But im fearing that weve heard the last from them on that front.
    jannick
    yeah... best live-band ever should just settle for records and stay home... i'd rather see them one last time than them making 10 albums before they quit.
    Rimfrost
    If they feel that they are getting too old to do live shows, then they should. Wouldnt mind seeing them a couple of more times as they are awesome live, but if it was one or the other, id go for a couple of new albums before they retire.
    jannick
    yeah... best live-band ever should just settle for records and stay home... i'd rather see them one last time than them making 10 albums before they quit.
    dial-a-death
    The thing is, Maiden, Priest, Saxon, Def Leppard, Kiss, AC/DC and Rush are the old guard. Priest have already cut down on their touring. Rush, whilst technically brilliant, and excellent live, do not tour to the extent of Maiden. On top of that, Neil is stuck behind the kit, and Geddy is hampered a little because of their reliance on foot triggers and the odd keyboards that he makes use of. Def Leppard are amazing live, and really on top of their game, but they don't have the intensity of Maiden. When you look into the details, Maiden are the biggest touring band in the world. They play 3 hour stadium gigs in different countries every 48 hours for months. That's INSANE. The amount of energy they put into each gig is incredible. No other band can match them for the effort they put in. I think they should cut down on the tours slightly- give themselves a bit of a break between dates, rather than exhaust themselves rushing from country to country. Who will take over? Metallica, Testament, and the like are all nearly as old as Maiden, and probably won't last much longer than Maiden will. Having said that, the likes Jethro Tull and Hawkwind are still touring.
    JordanFlayer
    While I will be extremely saddened by the retirement of my favorite band of all time and the band that has helped me become who I am today, both musically and personally. I am glad that I was right in thinking that when Maiden got to a certain age they would bow out gracefully instead of continuing on like some other bands. *coughaerosmithrollingstonescough*
    dcstar77715
    "Harris reflects that while Maiden could once have been regarded as a band towards the heaviest end of metal, "the emergence of hardcore and extreme bands have made us sound more like the 'Moody Blues'!"" no. i have to disagree, ill take Maiden over any extreme or hardcore metal band any day.
    LiamPodmore
    If anyone takes up the torch for live Rock music, for me it's bands like Shinedown, Halestorm and Rise Against. I've seen all 3 live and i was massively impressed by them all. Sure, they may not compare to bands like Iron Maiden and Judas Priest, but they're sure as hell keeping rock alive. All in my opinion of course, you may agree, you may not.
    LiamPodmore
    If anyone is going to take up the torch for live rock music, i think it'l be bands like Shinedown, Halestorm and Rise Against. All 3 of whom i've seen live and was mightily impressed by. Sure, they may not compare to bands like Iron Maiden and Judas Priest, but they're sure as hell keeping rock alive. All in my opinion of course, you may agree, you may not. Liam
    mayslash
    are you kidding me? Metallica is fat better live than Maiden they can easily carry the torch of an overrated band like Maiden