White Stripes Will Never Reform

Jack White says it would take bankruptcy for him to reform The White Stripes - but is there much difference between that and his solo act anyway?

White Stripes Will Never Reform
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Jack White says he will never reform The White Stripes - unless he hits bankruptcy. Despite a run of popular reunions in recent months, such as Black Sabbath, Van Halen and At The Drive-In, he says it would be "a really sad thing" if The White Stripes joined them in reforming. Asked by the NME if his former duo would ever reform, he said, "Absolutely no chance. I couldn't see any reason to ever do that. I'm not the kind of person that would retire from baseball and come out of retirement the next year. I mean, if we went to all the trouble of telling people we're done, we meant it you know?" He continued: "If we were forced to change our mind about that, I can only imagine the reason being if we went bankrupt or really needed the cash, which would be a really sad thing. I would probably be issuing an apology along with the announcement of the show dates." Since The White Stripes' demise, the songwriter has been preparing a debut solo record, "Blunderbuss". But as every rock fan knows, there's probably a thin line between Jack White's solo music and The White Stripes, which relied almost entirely on Jack's songwriting. Because of the lack of distinction between his solo work and his old band, Jack said he made it clear with his former drummer Meg White that their band had to be officially over. "I wanted Meg to come to a decision with me and officially put an end to it," Jack said. "I said eventually - I had no plans at the time - but eventually I'm going to record by myself under my name, and I don't really feel like going through the dumb perception battle of people who couldn't be broad minded enough to understand the difference between Jack White and The White Stripes." His album "Blunderbuss" will be released on his Third Man Records imprint on April 23, and will soon announce plans to tour the US.

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    TextOnTheScreen
    No, there is not a thin line between his solo work and The White Stripes. A lot of his work with Meg was influenced by Meg, by experiences they shared, by the limits her simplistic drumming style gave them. Of course he was the primary songwriter in the band, but without Meg it would have been entirely different. With the new record, he has a different approach, no limits, and no band legacy to tarnish. It can be entirely his this time, so it won't just be The White Stripes Minus One.
    Csimmons1267
    It always depresses me that I will never get to see The White Stripes perform live again. So much raw energy from the two of them.
    PinkFender_69
    At the rate with which he releases music, he could probably host a music fest with just his own bands/collaborations. Doubt he'll be seeing bankruptcy any time soon.
    Soundservant
    If he DID go bankrupt, there's all the more reason for him to play some good old depression blues.
    shredder3386
    This is kinda sad. I liked the White Stripes, but for some reason I can't bring myself to listen to Jack's solo work. The Stripes got a lot of criticism for being to "simple" but there was always a lot of honesty and raw energy in their music.
    RequiemofDemons
    Well that's kind of sad, but at the same time he's still making some pretty kick ass music so all the power too him \m/ any one know if Meg is doing any other work as well?
    RadioMuse
    I don't think the line between The White Stripes and Jack White's other projects have been 'thin' in the slightest. The White Stripes always had a stripped back duo style, that even when expanded in the studio was still very punchy, direct, and raw. Jack's influences are clearly much more broad than electric blues, occasional folk / 60s pop, and hard rock stomp, and his work since the White Stripes showcases those inspirational sources (Soul, classic (pre-1960) pop, jazz, blues, and other rock permutations). Sure, there's some common ground, but it's certainly not 'the same'. And I honestly believe the White Stripes are really and truly done. Why shouldn't they be?
    TextOnTheScreen
    HigherThanAMile wrote: TextOnTheScreen wrote: No, there is not a thin line between his solo work and The White Stripes. A lot of his work with Meg was influenced by Meg, by experiences they shared, by the limits her simplistic drumming style gave them. Of course he was the primary songwriter in the band, but without Meg it would have been entirely different. With the new record, he has a different approach, no limits, and no band legacy to tarnish. It can be entirely his this time, so it won't just be The White Stripes Minus One. Yea, except the only problem with your post is the fact that Jack White is listed as the WRITER for nearly every song on ALL of the albums released under The White Stripes. And, that your post suggests that without Meg, the songs would not have been written as we've heard them. There is a glimmer of truth to that but nothing else. They were written, arranged "in time" before Meg's time in the studio. However, to your credit you sort of acknowledged that. To get to the point, Meg has a collaborative writing credit on a couple of songs in TWS catalogue and maybe one or two other songs, but outside of that, it's JW all the way, Meg's drumming is primal, but nothing outside of what could of been contributed by a hundred other studio drummers that Jack could of easily directed. When Meg did the majority of her tracks, she had already heard the demos, and played to a click track. You're fooling yourself if you believe that Meg had anything to do with the arrangements. These are FACTS my friend, not just TextOnTheScreen.
    The songs were written to fit Meg's drumming capabilities. Obviously Meg was close to him, and a big part of his life (at least for a while) so of course a lot of the material was influenced by their experiences together. He's said all of this stuff in interviews before. Also, not sure if you've ever been in a band, but there's this thing called "band chemistry" that really influences that band's songwriting.
    joshro
    Sad news but at the same time, I'm glad he respects the fact that tons of fans (including myself) would love to hear more White Stripes songs. He's moving on though, and some of the best bands/artists in the world are classics because of their ability to evolve and progress. Jack White can be added to that list.
    socialdiseaze4l
    Extremely saddened by this. He'll keep making kick ass music til the day he dies though that's for sure and I personally look forward to hearing all of it.
    MoshGrizzly
    Craig_Christian wrote: just out of interest was meg his sister or his wife? yes I'm a useless moron.
    I'm pretty sure they were married for a time and then divorced with Meg keeping his name. But I know for a fact she isn't his sister.
    troyhoyt666
    Jack both took and kept MEG'S last name. She has always been Meg White. Jack White's 'maiden', and given name is John Gillis. Jack is a nickname for John, so I'm not sure if you could call Jack White a stage name, or not?
    ledzep426
    Just got a ticket to one of his solo shows today. Can't wait for that. He will play a sampler of all of his projects at the show. Couldn't ask for anything better.
    Datko
    If any of his solo work is anything like his other projects, look for a White Stripes reunion tour in 2013.
    HigherThanAMile
    TextOnTheScreen wrote: No, there is not a thin line between his solo work and The White Stripes. A lot of his work with Meg was influenced by Meg, by experiences they shared, by the limits her simplistic drumming style gave them. Of course he was the primary songwriter in the band, but without Meg it would have been entirely different. With the new record, he has a different approach, no limits, and no band legacy to tarnish. It can be entirely his this time, so it won't just be The White Stripes Minus One.
    Yea, except the only problem with your post is the fact that Jack White is listed as the WRITER for nearly every song on ALL of the albums released under The White Stripes. And, that your post suggests that without Meg, the songs would not have been written as we've heard them. There is a glimmer of truth to that but nothing else. They were written, arranged "in time" before Meg's time in the studio. However, to your credit you sort of acknowledged that. To get to the point, Meg has a collaborative writing credit on a couple of songs in TWS catalogue and maybe one or two other songs, but outside of that, it's JW all the way, Meg's drumming is primal, but nothing outside of what could of been contributed by a hundred other studio drummers that Jack could of easily directed. When Meg did the majority of her tracks, she had already heard the demos, and played to a click track. You're fooling yourself if you believe that Meg had anything to do with the arrangements. These are FACTS my friend, not just TextOnTheScreen.
    Hungry_Hameds
    sure the music on Blunderbuss might be a little similar, you could even say that it's the Stripes getting a bassist and a good drummer... rather see more raconteurs than WS reunion...
    Vicryl 2.0
    Craig_Christian wrote: just out of interest was meg his sister or his wife? yes I'm a useless moron.
    they were married once and she became his sister after. hope that helps
    XahXhaX
    But think of the fans! It's been so many decades since we had the original White Stripes lineup! Exactly like Black Sabbath, Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd, and others! Don't you think it's time?
    HigherThanAMile
    TextOnTheScreen wrote: He's said all of this stuff in interviews before. Also, not sure if you've ever been in a band, but there's this thing called "band chemistry" that really influences that band's songwriting.
    Well, thanks for your response. I had a little bourbon and a few beers in me when I posted last night, and my post kind of comes across as a little abrasive. No, never been in a band. Also, never spent time arranging music, never recorded any music, never heard of this thing you call chemistry, never gave drum tracks to a drummer* It seems to me that if JW really gives that much credit to her as you suggest, he wouldn't of cut her out of the royalties the way he did with the writing credits. I'd like to read these interviews that you're talking about. Not because I don't believe you, but because I want to read a little more about what brought you to your conclusion. *I'm lying.