Alice in Chains Frontman Calls New Album a 'Jab at Ultra-Right Religious Conservatives'

"We have seen an aggressive push from the ultra-right wing religious conservatives since the election of President Obama," says singer William DuVall.

Alice in Chains Frontman Calls New Album a 'Jab at Ultra-Right Religious Conservatives'
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The upcoming Alice In Chains record "The Devil Put Dinosaurs Here" might come with a bit of an odd title, but it actually conceals a rather interesting story. As you may have read before, the album refers to a religious fundamentalists' belief saying that Satan planted dinosaur bones into the Earth to confuse the believers and deter them from their faith. After the group's mainman Jerry Cantrell initially revealed the record's background story, singer William DuVall has now given somewhat of a more in-depth analysis of the new album and what it stands for. "It's actually a comment on intolerance," DuVall tells the Miami New Times. "A gentle or maybe not-so-gentle jab at a certain sector of society that's decided their particular brand of religious conviction should legislate all of our behavior and even our rights as citizens. "I think, in the last few years, we have seen an aggressive push from the ultra-right wing religious conservative minority in this country, certainly since the election of President Obama. Some of the things we've seen politicians say on national television and in the press ... You can try to have a sense of humor. But at a certain point, it just gets to be like, 'Wow.'" Although Alice in Chains were never especially known for social commentary, the vocalist thinks that the current situation within the modern society has made the group opt for such a step. And despite "The Devil Put Dinosaurs Here" being merely a single song, the decision to turn it into an album title has "put a different kind of emphasis on that message," which DuVall considers as a "good move" and "a step forward for the band." "There was a great deal of discussion among the four of us about the potential blowback. But we have people being elected to our government who are trying to bar science from being taught to kids in school," said the vocalist. "So not only do we have to deal with the assault on women's reproductive rights and this battle over whether homosexuals even have the right to equal protection under the law, but they actually want to roll back evolution? Didn't we solve this issue about 100 years ago? It's ridiculous." But the social commentary is not something the band is planning to turn into a regular theme. In singers own words, "Alice in Chains is not about to become some protest band. [laughs] It's not like we're not trying to pick up where Rage Against the Machine left off." "With this album, it's more of a subtle, tongue-in-cheek, somewhat serious thing. The actual lyric in the song is 'No problem with faith, just fear.' So again, it's about intolerance. We're not going after anybody for having religious faith, whether they be Christian, Muslim, Hindu. It's all fine - until it starts infringing on our rights and trying to control the legislative branch. That is a problem." "The Devil Put Dinosaurs Here" is ready to drop on May 28 via Virgin/EMI records. As the groups fifth record and a follow-up to 2009's "Black Gives Way to Blue," it is their second album to feature DuVall handling the vocal duties.

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    jordo246
    There's actually people trying to get science of the curriculum? Wtf world.
    DickHardwood
    That's been an issue in US schools for years now. Doesn't catch on that much in Europe, thankfully.
    matteo cubano
    Trust me, it hasn't come close to happening in the U.S. either. I'm sure there's some tiny group out there trying to to do that, but believe me, they're of no threat and will not succeed. That's why I think making a jab at those people is just kind of a waste of time because it's too easy.
    DickHardwood
    I had the impression that there were schools that taught creationism instead of evolution.
    matteo cubano
    I went to a private Christian high school, they didn't really teach anything like creationism directly, they just taught biology, physics, and chemistry and gave you the facts of science. In a Bible class they may talk about creationism, but in my experience at least, they were extremely open minded and respected people believing what they wanted. There's some schools out there for younger kids who may teach creationism in the sense they tell the Biblical story but then also have science classes that teach facts of modern science in terms of how things work and maybe they'll just leave out learning what evolved into what, eventually if a kid wants to be a scientist he can go to college and learn all that. but trust me, it will never be regulated to take science out of any school in the U.S.
    xero1123
    To set the record straight, the Catholic church supports the theory of evolution and Pope John Paul II issued a statement saying that there can never be conflict between science and religion. The problem is that you have all these crazy protestant fundamentalists and pretend Catholics who are pushing these ideas. For the record, I went to Catholic gradeschool, Catholic High school, and am going to be graduating from a Catholic university in about two weeks. While in grade school, they taught us that God created us, but never made any claims such as the earth was only 6000 years old. I learned adaptation and evolution in 5th grade, with no religious censorship. I'm getting a Bachelor's of Science in Psychology, a program which is basically devoid of religious opinion here at my school. Even in high school we learned about evolution. TL;DR Its a minority of crazy right wing fundamentalists (mostly) protestants that have this view. Not all religious schooling is bad.
    HolyDiver1118
    That was my experience as well xero1123. Catholics seem like they're much more science-friendly than more of the protestant groups which interpret the Bible literally
    UncleBluck
    There are in several states including Texas. matteo does not know what he is talking about...
    samhell
    Its not happening in the religious sense (teaching creationism instead of evolution) but it is happening in the sense of they teach feelings over science. Its more important that the kid feels good about his answers on a quiz vs actually getting the correct answer. We care less about science and more about self esteem. I notice kids getting out of school have their self esteem crushed when seeking employment because they can't do basic math or know even the most basic science. But hey, as long as they feel good about themselves right?
    KerNeL_KLuTcH
    and that's the cause of the Democrat controlled public education system, the fundies are not a threat, they have no power.
    Breakingpoint56
    Lets not go there. The system has been in decline for years. Education needs reformed completely. Teach more varied subjects earlier.
    eiron_y
    You must not be from where I'm from, then lol. Aside from my high school biology teacher refusing to teach evolution, Tennessee passed a Creationism bill last year, Oklahoma passed one in February, and many other major pieces of legislation are being proposed all across the U.S. on a perpetual basis. You're correct in saying that it's a tiny group, it's just that the tiny group is in a position of power is some places.
    suicidehummer
    Actually, they may be a minority, but they have the full support of the Republican party. They back every idea, no matter how extreme-right it is because you can never be too conservative (to them). And this is a real threat because they are the ones with the money and power. There are many school districts where they're trying to force through the teaching of creationism, that's how the flying spaghetti monster thing started. I would have no problem with them if they would base their views on reality, rather than try to decieve people and warp reality to fit their views (ahem, Fox News).
    DisarmGoliath
    Not sure why this (suicidehummer's comment) got downvotes, from what I understand it's pretty accurate.
    Sammy Mantis
    I went to a Catholic school in the US and we were taught evolution in our Biology classes, and that was years ago, so I'm not sure exactly where this is taking place if it is at all.
    Firehawk2410
    Same here. But the Catholic Church is irrelevant to this. In fact, they invest a lot of money in scientific research hoping to prove these warped people wrong someday. The problem lies in small independent Protestant conservative groups who (not always) usually identify as "baptists" and take the Bible 100% literally, and they refuse to believe any scientific findings because they believe it is a malicious attack on religion sent by Satan. I think it just makes them feel better about themselves if they can find an excuse to say most of the world other than them is evil.
    rocker222
    There is always some type of issue with a us school. We have nothing better to do but complain about stupid shit.
    AaronianKenrod
    What a horrible and backwards world it would became if it succeeded. If America seriously ends up getting rid of science it'll lose a hell of a lot of money from stuff like car/tech production. Everyone else will move forward and America would only have like...produce and stuff.
    Mr Winters
    These religious nuts apparently don't understand that science is what has made what the world is today possible.
    AaronianKenrod
    I once saw someone on Facebook say that science was just people "****ing up the world". Someone wrote this on a computer, built by science, on the Internet, built by science, on what was either probably a mac or pc (both created by atheists via science) and written on Facebook (created by science and an atheist). Do they think god just 'wills' these things into existence? Why didn't he create the Internet 2000 years ago so everyone in the world could see proof of Jesus?
    justtryme90
    Not all scientists are athiests. Source: I am a scientist, and I know many other scientists. Religion in fact has not always shunned science either, its only a slightly more modern invention in human history in which religion decided to be incompatible with science.
    AaronianKenrod
    I never said they were dude - read my post, I highlighted the three people who are atheist: Bill Gates, Steve Jobs and Mark Zuckerburg.
    MrDo0m
    No one can see "proof" of Jesus.. I think that's kind of the point.
    MrDo0m
    science [sahy-uh ns] (noun) - systematic knowledge of the physical or material world gained through observation and experimentation. Pretty sure you can't just "get rid of that."
    rebreh
    I would favor this as it would make science much easier. God would be the only answer.
    Braykah
    Well said by William. Religion has no place whatsoever in how a country should be run, just let each and everyone have their own faith as long as they don't try to force it on anyone else.
    Nero Galon
    Even the extremists of Islam rely on science for their bombs and weapons etc. Just saying...
    Gantz92
    A rock band criticizing religious conservatives. What else is in the news UG? Mustaine saying something crazy?
    Mr Winters
    I'm ok with this. Right wing religious zealots should just fu ck off to Mars or some other place far away and leave us alone.
    SocksAndTrees
    It really annoys me that atheists (Not all, just a lot that I've seen)act like all religious people are absolutely insane for believing in something contrary to their belief. That being said, it's also ****ing stupid that religious people (Again) act the same. People need to learn that their opinion isn't the only thing in he world.
    EyesWideOpen
    What are you talking about? Who's acting like all religious people are insane? Certainly not the guy from the article. Did you ever bother to read it?
    SocksAndTrees
    I said nothing about the article, which I did read, by the way. I was referring to a common attitude I've seen among atheists (and religions as well)
    saint_berzerker
    Nice, Jerry....take 1 kook's opinion and demonize an entire belief system that billions of people have had for thousands of years. I've been a Christian all my life and have never heard such nonsense w/ the dinosaur bones. I believe in science, as millions of Christians do.
    EyesWideOpen
    He isn't taking a potshot at every Christian. Only the extreme ones. Stop playing the victim, crying at imagined insults.
    mnewland1
    But I wonder why Christians? why take potshots at any Christians? if he wants to mock and piss off a religion, how about the crazy ****ing Muslims that have been wreaking havok around the world in recent times? Oh yeah that's right, he's a pussy and he picks his battles accordingly.
    RunsWithXissors
    He's not mocking any religion. Just zealots who want to force everyone to believe what they believe. As far as I'm concerned, they're just as crazy as the Ancient Aliens true-believers. And I like that show!
    mnewland1
    He's going after a VERY small minority of people that want such ridiculous things as abolishment of science in American classrooms. Probably 99% of Americans don't think this way. The other 1% are either religious based or are the kind of morons who lie to curve the grade in inner city schools. Its just kind of a boring subject to "take a stand against", and all too predictable.
    mlukeroberts222
    In a day and age where a lot of music is stale and watered down with little to no messages, it is refreshing to see a band of AIC's stature taking on an issue that means so much to a substantial number of people.
    matteo cubano
    Lol, this the most unoriginal message any rock band could come up with though. I would be shocked if a band came out with a conservative based message of any sort in a rock song, trust me you wouldn't be saying it was refreshing to see a band taking on an issue.