It's The End Of The Week As We Know It: Part 31 - Rock And Roll Is Dead

Congratulations, you made it through the first week of 2012!

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Congratulations, you made it through the first week of 2012! If you have any mystery bruises or discovered that you now possess several articles of clothing that aren't yours, you probably had a decent New Years Eve celebration. It was sure fun while it lasted. But now, sadly, the holidays have come to an end and we're getting back in the grind. Back to school, back to work, back to doing absolutely nothing... we'll fall back into the same routines and rhythms soon enough.

But let's cut right to the chase - we have a tragedy on our hands, one you may or may not have seen coming. Apparently, late last night, rock and roll was taken into an emergency room after suffering devastating injuries. Doctors tried everything they could, but due to an overload of terrible artists, mismanagement, clichd image and neglect, rock and roll couldn't make it through the night. Rock and roll is now dead. R.I.P. 1/5/12.

It's dead, I tell ya! Looks like Lenny Kravitz was right, although with his song, apparently rock has been dead since 1995. You've heard the phrase before; many have touted the demise of rock and roll, implying that what rock once stood for hasn't existed for quite some time, and what's left are the skeletal remains of what used to be one of the most immensely popular music genres of the 20th century.

I guess that'll be the debate for this week: is it true that rock and roll is dead, or is this claim a load of horse doo doo?

I'm on the fence about it. While I have firmly defended the merits of rock music to ignorant hip-hop lovers in the past (in 8th grade, I got into an argument with a girl who claimed that it took way more talent to write lyrics and rap than play a musical instrument; I don't think I won that argument), nowadays though, I'm completely uninspired and even a little irritated with rock music. I'm finding it boring. I'll give you an example: when I was home for the holidays, my mom was watching some Oprah program (because that's what moms do: watch Oprah) and on the show, Steven Tyler from Aerosmith was getting chummy with Oprah and yakkin' about his rock roots and rebirth of fame on "American Idol". Steven Tyler is now the ambassador of rock music to (relatively) ignorant mainstream audiences. I'd rather the world well, general public not think of Steven Tyler when they conjure up notions about rock music.

So why am I feeling so disenchanted with rock music these days? Besides The Beatles (I can't get tired of them), I haven't felt compelled to listen to anything rock in the past several weeks, my main go-to genres usually being old jazz and classical. That all just sounds more interesting bouncing off my eardrums. Rock, well, I've grown tired of its aesthetics and the music seems pretty stagnant. Power chords and pentatonic solos just aren't doing it for me currently.

But this week, I'm going to get to the bottom of my current beef with current rock music, and figure out if it is really dead. Maybe I agree; maybe rock in its pure sense is, in fact, dead. Or maybe it's just in a comatose state on a respirator. And I'll point the question to you guys: are you pleased with the current state of rock music, or do you think it's time for a massive cleansing? And if it isn't dead, who the hell is going to save it? Is rock quickly losing its appeal and could it potentially meet similar fates as the many now-dead genres of the 20th century?

And do I like to ask a bunch of rhetorical, ponderous, and open-ended questions? Damn right I do.

News Stories That Pertain To My Theme

Ke$ha Wants To Rok Out

To say that this story pleased UG readers is to say that Scott Stapp is enjoying a successful solo career. Apparently, pop singer Ke$ha revealed that she has a certain affinity for rock music and is planning on releasing some rock music herself. Quoting Ke$ha: "People say that rock and roll is dead, and it is my mission and my goal to resurrect it in the form of my pop music." Hm. So basically, she has appointed herself to be the figure that will breathe new life into the dead genre of rock and roll. It sure is nice of her to offer, but I don't think she's necessarily the woman for the job. Assuming that she figures she reaches a far wider audience than most rock bands, and for that reason she'll be able to convert more fans and save the genre, time will tell if she's able to pull off decent rock music, or merely release some painfully forced "rock", similar to Celine Dion butchering an AC/DC classic.

At this point, I think it's important to make an important distinction in the whole "rock is dead" observation. Basically, it's dead in the mainstream sense. That is, the kind of music that reaches very large audiences and is considerably consumed and reacted to. There will always be high quality music coming from bands that operate in smaller scenes or cater to relatively smaller-yet-devoted audiences. So before you go on to interject that, for instance, Guthrie Govan or Animals As Leaders are saving the modern electric guitar, know that their audiences are far smaller and are doubtful to get bigger unless the artists "commercialize" their sound, at which point you'll lose interest in them. Of course high quality rock music (pretty broad term) is coming out now, but what I'm trying to figure out is if there will be another Zeppelin, Beatles, Elvis, Queen or Pink Floyd - rock artists that produce incredible albums and also happen to sell millions of records and appeal to millions of people. In the current state of the music industry, and our nation's desire to consume borderline retarded entertainment (Jersey Shore) it seems unlikely that for lack of a better word cool artists will prevail and become insanely popular.

It's a no brainer that technology has contributed to rock's shunning. Perhaps a reason why Zep and Floyd were so huge and their albums became so iconic was because the technology at the time record players essentially demanded that the listener take in the entire album. Now, technology encourages the consumer to only buy what they know they're going to like. A 14-year-old girl who heard a Barenaked Ladies song in an "American Pie" movie probably won't buy an entire album, but merely look up the song she knows she likes and fork up 99 cents. So that's one aspect (of many) - albums don't matter as much as they used to; although, that's not true for every artist, but regarding pop music, it's all about the single.

Taste is another big thing. A likely reason rock is dying is because of the images associated with it. The "rock" style looks tacky now. Tracing back, with the launch and popularization of MTV, the visual nature of artists became extremely important to their success. Take what happened with "hair metal" in the 80s: the only time in history where metal music was mainstream, yet it was metal disguised as pop with image and spectacle as the #1 priority. It sold for a short while, but soon fell out of fashion and became a huge joke. Currently, rock imagery seems hokey and unhip. The look is mostly tied to the genre's history and used for novelty. Check out the trailer for this damn movie starring Tom Cruise. Nothing about this screams cool and current. It screams, "HEY! REMEMBER WHEN ROCK WAS SO MUCH FUN! I CAN'T BELIEVE I TEASED MY HAIR LIKE THAT IN '86!" Just... so lame... can't... take it...

These superficial and technological reasons are just a few possible factors in why the mainstream basically ignores rock and roll music. But then good ol' Steven Tyler reminds them of rock's better days on "American Idol".

So in Ke$ha's case, no, she's not the talent that is going to make rock suddenly popular and cool again. She's nowhere as innovative as Lady Gaga and looks like the poor man's version of Christina Aguilera in her slutty phase, but without the talent. She isn't the rock savior. But f-ck it, she could try. Why not? Even if it pushes 10 middle school teenyboppers in the slightest direction toward good rock music, it's better than nothing.

Flat And Sharp Keys - It's The Artists' Fault!

According to the percussive half of The Black Keys, it's not necessarily the culture's fault for rock's demise; rather, the music we're offered may be the culprit. The drummer conveys that because Nickelback is "the biggest band in the world" the effect is a lowered bar of expectation; musicians assume that to become big, they need to sacrifice substance for success. Fair assessment? For those who find Nickelback to be 5% substance and 95% cheese, it seems so. But I'm not here to start a flame war and/or rhetorical discussion on the artistic merits of Nickelback (I kind of did that a few weeks ago), but if, for the sake of argument, we can classify Nickelback in the "radio friendly" rock category, then we can move on with The Black Key's claim.

Does anyone really like radio rock? I mean, is Staind actually good? Disturbed? Creed? Drowning Pool? Chevelle? Three Days Grace? Vertical Horizon? I'm kind of stretching here...

But as mainstream rock radio continues to spin those power ballads and formulaic rock jams, no wonder the average person would rather turn the radio dial to something a little fresher. Modern radio rock lacks balls it's well produced and has some heavy characteristics, but the songs are all predictable and not that memorable. It's justmeh. Maybe you like it though (this is just my opinion) but because I happen to agree with The Black Keys drummer, I believe that rock isn't flattering itself very much nowadays.

Rock Resurrection

Now then, who is going emerge as rock's Messiah? For a while in the mid-2000s, it looked like bands like Jet and The Strokes were at the forefront of bringing stripped-down, no effects, guitar-bass-drums-vocals rock back to the mainstream. But that trend soon died. For now, I think we need to rely on the veterans to keep the good rock coming. Slash, Van Halen, Rush... They all seem to be doing just fine with their later releases and the upcoming releases seem hopeful. Established acts like the Foo Fighters are kicking a-s and even heavier outfits like Mastodon are seeping into mainstream consciousness. This is all great, yet the magnitude of popularity is nowhere near the Beibs and Gagas, Kanyes and Ke$has of the overall commercial music world.

Rock needs the next Led Pink Beatles an immensely popular band that captures the attention of the world, influences the shape of music to come. Is it even possible for another Beatles to exist, or will this century's most important artists dwell in hip-hop, pop and electronic music? Honestly, I don't know. Quality obviously doesn't equal popularity (that's why we get so frustrated when "shallow" music tops the charts) but when quality and popularity meet, then you get the truly special music that is nearly unanimously enjoyed by all. Let's hope we get some of that soon.

Wow, now I actually feel like listening to some rock music! Pessimism nixed and Queen it will be. Now go forth into the weekend and practice an insane amount of guitar so you can be the next Jimmy Page.

On The Next It's The End Of The Week As We Know It:

Ke$ha finally finds her vehicle to deliver rock to the masses: replacing Howard Jones in Killswitch Engage.

After fans find out that the supposed "lost" Radiohead track wasn't actually real, an actual authentic lost Radiohead track is found from "The Bends" sessions. This is the track.

Lamb Of God vocalist, Randy Blythe, ends up joining the Republican presidential race, eventually squaring off with Barack Obama in a series of contentious debates and scream offs.

By Zach Pino

90 comments sorted by best / new / date

    Vetpro
    'Ke$ha finally finds her vehicle to deliver rock to the masses: replacing Howard Jones in Killswitch Engage.' I love you
    thebluechihua
    sLiPtALLica wrote: I think rock and metal is so much better when its underground and you have to go find it yourself. It just feels so much more real and natural when bands arent playing to huge audiences. Im honestly kind of turned off by bands that are popular even if they are decent, for example I kind of like the black keys, but I feel weird listening to them because of their popularity
    someone's quite the hipster...
    jurnag12
    No genre of music can be truly dead as long as people enjoy listening or playing it. The only one listening to Rock is an old Russian dude in Vladivostok with an old copy of Back in Black? Rock still ain't dead.
    eclipse812
    Oh Pino very sneaky....very, very sneaky.....lol Those who clicked a particular link will know what im taking about.
    RaysGotThis
    First off I gotta say kudos for a well written and funny column. It's nice to see a take that engages a bit with the ideas being talked about rather than just laying out statements for people to fight over. I think those people saying that rock got so popular because there was a pop aspect to it because it was novel are right, at least to an extent. Rock sprang up as a unique genre and went against the grain at first, but it didn't take long to become marketed to one group or another. The way it grew into its own in the 70s was awesome and there was great music as a result of that, but I don't think we're gonna see that again, at least not until this musical cycle turns away from "pop" pop and hip hop and to something different. That said, I think you're giving the Beatles a bit much credit. LET ME SAY that musically, I don't doubt their influence or contributions; they did a lot of crazy stuff that inspired a lot of people to go a lot of different ways, musically. But I feel that from a cultural angle, they get overstated. People seem to feel like they HAVE to be great, they're the fu cking Beatles, but that's not how it should work. They were on everybody's lips for a long time, but so are a lot of the big pop stars now. Hell, there were even droves of people going nuts about them, just like now. I don't think that's something I'd want to see repeat itself. We don't need that. That's how we end up with what we have: artists (term used loosely) put on a pedestal that they may not necessarily deserve. The thing is, we need something refreshing in the musical environment. When it came around, grunge was refreshing compared to hair metal, rock was refreshing compared to blues, metal was refreshing compared to disco. Something inspiring has to replace what's popular. Unfortunately anything that replaces something that was popular is likely to suffer the same fate. THAT is worrying. Rock had a great run for a few decades, but maybe it's better as a genre when it's not in the spotlight. Don't get me wrong, I love hair metal and I don't see anything wrong with some of the modern rock out there, but I don't think that it's going to live up to the artists of the rock heyday. I have my doubts that even the older acts that are still going can revitalize the genre. I'm a grass is greener on the other side kind of person, but maybe it's better off this way, at least for the time being.
    ShevanelFlip
    CronoMagus wrote: I think we have to come to terms with the fact that true Rock and Roll will never be popular again. There is a trend in what is popular and what isn't. It's usually what the newer genre of music is. When Rock and Roll came out in the mid 20th century, it was a brand new type of music, so people flocked to it. Same with grunge in the 90's, rap in the late 90s/2000s and pop from the 2000s/2010s.
    Dude there was pop way before the 00's. Think of disco and synth pop of the 80's.
    eclipse812
    Good article though. These articles seem to be the most intellectual on here, I actually feel wiser when leaving then when I arrived.
    EpiExplorer
    ShevanelFlip wrote: CronoMagus wrote: I think we have to come to terms with the fact that true Rock and Roll will never be popular again. There is a trend in what is popular and what isn't. It's usually what the newer genre of music is. When Rock and Roll came out in the mid 20th century, it was a brand new type of music, so people flocked to it. Same with grunge in the 90's, rap in the late 90s/2000s and pop from the 2000s/2010s. Dude there was pop way before the 00's. Think of disco and synth pop of the 80's.
    Pop's been around since the late 50's. Everything from Motown, for example, then came the Beatles, the Who and so on, all considered pop to an extent.
    ds24601
    sLiPtALLica wrote: I think rock and metal is so much better when its underground and you have to go find it yourself. It just feels so much more real and natural when bands arent playing to huge audiences. Im honestly kind of turned off by bands that are popular even if they are decent, for example I kind of like the black keys, but I feel weird listening to them because of their popularity
    Says the guy whose name is an amalgamation of Slipknot and Metallica...
    EpiExplorer
    eclipse812 wrote: Oh Pino very sneaky....very, very sneaky.....lol Those who clicked a particular link will know what im taking about.
    Always be on yer guard. Otherwise. THE GAME.
    Pete13
    Great article man, couldnt agree more with many of your points; especially the one about weak radio rock bands. disturbed and the like. Good stuff. Also F@ck jersey shore too, may aswel watch chimps throw sh@t at each other at the zoo.
    ToolCreedence
    Tool is the Led Pink Beatles of my generation. And they should be putting out a new album in the next year or six...
    soXlittleXtimeX
    This article reminds me of why I got tired of listening to most "core" music. I was huge on that stuff when it was still on the rise, and it was that first wave of bands who helped make it popular (and sort of defined the genre) who I really enjoyed. After a while though, that music started sounding the same as it grew formulaic by whatever means (by it being "commercialized" or the fact that I can only handle so many breakdowns) and my interest grew thin. Whether it's commercialized or not, other artists who really enjoy a certain band/genre/whatever, will usually strive to create a similar sound. Now, thousands of "core" bands later, the genre just seems so used up, and (most, not all of) the new bands seem watered-down or generic. I find the veterans are the only ones I can truly enjoy listening to. it's gotten to the point where that genre isn't even taken seriously most of the time and has become somewhat of a novelty. I think there's always going to be that "first" in any genre of music, but probably to no where near the extent of The Beatles/Zeppelin and such. As long as music continues to be commercialized the way it is, I don't see a "music revolution" happening anytime soon.
    austinblair
    Id say Staind is the best "Modern" rock there is, even though they've been around a while, and Creed will be making a bang this year, and theres also Alter Bridge who is fresh and heavy... I wouldn't say rock is anywhere near as strong as it was in the 90's/Early 00's Just my opinion though.
    b1gf00t123
    Rock isn't dead, its now underground. Unfortunately, you have to search a lot harder in order to find good rock music, but it's out there. California currently has this great garage rock scene with artists like Ty Segall, Mikal Cronin, Thee Oh Sees and Sic Alps kicking ass. But you'll never find those artists on the radio. There are bands all around the world just waiting to get mainstream recognition i.e; Yuck, Unknown Mortal Orchestra, Titus Andronicus, Fucked Up, No Age, King Khan and the Shrines, Deerhunter... The list goes on and on. So as I said before, rock isn't dead, it's underground.
    Lion_Slicer
    Zach, for the first time I feel like you screwed up. Chevelle is brilliant. Unlike the other bands, Chevelle takes a lot of influence from Tool and actually manages to not sound like a shitty 90s Metallica cover band. They're radio rock, to be sure... but they're GOOD.
    Zeppelin Addict
    thebluechihua wrote: sLiPtALLica wrote: The Good I think rock and metal is so much better when its underground and you have to go find it yourself. The Bad It just feels so much more real and natural when bands arent playing to huge audiences. Im honestly kind of turned off by bands that are popular even if they are decent, for example I kind of like the black keys, but I feel weird listening to them because of their popularity The Stereotype someone's quite the hipster...
    I've got a huge problem with BOTH of you and I'm going to tell you why. The 2 sides of hipsterism: 1. The bad (the side everybody stereotypes) This should really go without saying but, audience size of an artist should be the last thing to judge an artist by.. That's ridiculous and falls into the retarded half of the hipster image. I absolutely hate the 'I've been listening to them before they were popular' or 'Yea, I used to like them, but then they got all popular and sold out so I stopped.' Good music is ****ing good music. You should be glad that other people take interest in a talented band who plays their music for the love of music. Share the camaraderie, be happy for the band that they're getting their message out there as well as make a living doing what they absolutely love. The only exception in my opinion is these "artists" who are corporate products and only produce music to make a buck. Personally, I think they should be shunned and just hated on altogether. That's not the spirit of music, that's abuse of audio. Zero Integrity. I guess it's hard to tell that to a bunch of 13 year old girls who've doubtfully ever heard of the Beatles though, right? 2. The good (the overlooked side, more people need to adapt) At the same time, a hell of a lot more people need to adapt a bit of good 'hipster' quality to them instead of complaining about the state of music. There really are a hell of a lot of amazing talents 'underground' that, yea.. You do need to go find for yourself. That is how talent is brought to the spotlight. You've heard artists say how they couldn't get to where they are without their fans? It's because it's damn true. But.. Most are lazy and like to sit back and complain about what's right in front of their eyes because that's what's popular right now instead of going out and doing something about it. So sliptallica, I hope you devolve from your high throne that is stereotypical hipsterism.. You'll be so much better off for it if you have an open-mind for the music and not open eyes for the audience size. As for Mr. Chihuahua and the rest of you, adapt a bit of hipster spirit and stop complaining. Go out and find a new local band or someone you like online and start supporting them. Watching a band grow is an awesome experience, just stay along for the ride. Half of the hate geared towards hipsters seems to be jealousy from people wishing they'd found out about a band sooner. The other half? Go back to point #1. OT: It's not dead, It's not dying, it won't ever go away. It will always be growing and evolving into something new that is just as rock n roll.
    Eifler121
    butterfingers30 wrote: nboyjn wrote: ....did you just call disturbed radio rock??? I was offended by that as well.
    Well they are. In its worst form.
    Mikethespud
    It's the same case with gaming now, take CoD for example, it's the most popular game out there, and yet it's one of the most dumbed-down, repetitive, unoriginal ones too. I've tried explaining how terrible pop music is to my friends, but they won't listen
    axeslinger0u812
    Pop is a relative term. Composers in the late 18th century were known to be "pop." Rock being dead is also relative. Modern musicians on the pop charts are injecting rock into their music, something Japan's charts has been doing for decades. The difference between the heyday of rock and the modern age is the Internet. Every underground artist is much more known in today's musical landscape than they were before, but The days of a band taking the world by storm are long gone. I say, just find the artists you love, and support them. Never mind arguing "who really gets the money from album sales" or fracturing support within your genre of choice. If you buy the CDs of artists you enjoy, that shows the people in charge that there's a market for that style of music, and they will continue to sign and promote those artists. Simple logic, really.
    Thatguy89
    EpiExplorer wrote: eclipse812 wrote: Oh Pino very sneaky....very, very sneaky.....lol Those who clicked a particular link will know what im taking about. Always be on yer guard. Otherwise. THE GAME.
    i lost the game.You Bastard!!!
    Cold Flame44
    I don't think a lack of mainstream popularity means a genre is dead. If that was the case, Jazz would have been dead quite a long time ago... There are still tons of awesome rock bands touring and putting out music. Also, there are still tons of kids these days who are forming their own rock bands with their friends, myself included. Rock is far from dead. I think it's a little silly to worry about whose topping the charts. Remember, every decade has had it's own version of bad, yet chart topping, pop music.
    CronoMagus
    EpiExplorer wrote: ShevanelFlip wrote: CronoMagus wrote: I think we have to come to terms with the fact that true Rock and Roll will never be popular again. There is a trend in what is popular and what isn't. It's usually what the newer genre of music is. When Rock and Roll came out in the mid 20th century, it was a brand new type of music, so people flocked to it. Same with grunge in the 90's, rap in the late 90s/2000s and pop from the 2000s/2010s. Dude there was pop way before the 00's. Think of disco and synth pop of the 80's. Pop's been around since the late 50's. Everything from Motown, for example, then came the Beatles, the Who and so on, all considered pop to an extent.
    This I understand. I'm talking more along the lines of how over the past 10 years the Pop sound has taken over every genre of music on the radio. You can turn to a hard rock station and here hard rock songs that sound more like pop rock songs, Hip Hop stations are a mashup of pop and dance music anymore, and so on. The only stations that remain unchanged are the classic rock stations, but those stations get boring as hell after years of listening to essentially the same setlists.
    thrashdeth
    rock isn't dead, it's just underground so that the mainstream can't ruin it. And I hope it stays that way. Just look at Metallica. Mainstream attention doesn't make great bands, but it's sure good at ruining them!
    Dardar1989
    In the Pink Floyd Pompii video guess what the interviewer asks? Is rock dying, and that was what 1971/1972? This is the oldest topic in rock. Things go in circles, fads come and go. Rock will however develop over time and may even evolve into a new genre(s), as rock did with blues/jazz
    Tonganation
    The Nickelback section basically explained every problem I have with the modern post-grunge genre of rock. It's formulaic in its songwriting and instrumentation, and every band of the genre sounds the same. They try to be more innovative by adding heavier guitar parts, probably due to the increasing underground popularity of metal, but it's still the same bands that are not evolving their styles and producing the same albums over and over again. What bands aren't doing this water down their music to make it more radio friendly in an attempt to stay current. The only innovation I see taking in place in rock is in the metal genre, and metal isn't enjoying the popularity it used to. Hopefully heavy artists like Mastodon can bring it to a more mainstream audience and maybe inject some innovation into lighter rock acts.
    Eifler121
    Rock is starting to pick up, I mean, I don't get what the fuss is about it being dead. The Black Keys are getting huge, Jack White is getting almost as much attention now as when Seven Nation Army came out, Florence and the Machine is getting huge, Adele is closer to blues and soft rock than anything else, Foo Fighters are all over the place, Red Hot Chili Peppers are still doing their thing, Amos Lee got some VH1 time, Mumford and Sons are huge. I don't know what you guys want. Seems like what you guys really want is a metal revival.
    noisewall11
    Winner Z wrote: rock isn't dead, it's just waiting for Tool to make a new album, as long as it doesn't sound like another 10,000 days.
    Revolution_87
    I dont get people saying rock is dead, Its never been as popular as pop music...thats what makes it special and ours, It enjoys varying levels of success from huge well known bands like Metallica, AC/DC to newer bands like Nickelback and the foo's to less well known bands like Mastodon and Lamb of God to varying extents of the general public's conciousness. Rock is what you make it, dont bitch cause not everyone thinks your band is the shit because we all know if we did you'd hate on them for being popular...so many damn hipsters out there that need to grow up.
    Hamham272
    A band called Tool still exists. You wait for halfway through this year and see how mainstream alt rock becomes again.
    fireaxx789
    Eifler121 wrote: Rock is starting to pick up, I mean, I don't get what the fuss is about it being dead. The Black Keys are getting huge, Jack White is getting almost as much attention now as when Seven Nation Army came out, Florence and the Machine is getting huge, Adele is closer to blues and soft rock than anything else, Foo Fighters are all over the place, Red Hot Chili Peppers are still doing their thing, Amos Lee got some VH1 time, Mumford and Sons are huge. I don't know what you guys want. Seems like what you guys really want is a metal revival.
    Especially since the metal revival is already in full swing. So many forward thinking, talented metal bands have surfaced in the recent years it's not even funny.
    Zeppelin Addict
    staggguitarhead wrote: AC/DC - as long as there are here, rock will be strong. Angus just puts his SG straight into the amp, with no effects. Now that's rock!
    As much as AC/DC portrays rock, rock doesn't need AC/DC.. They can retire. Their albums feel like they have less and less integrity every time. They're like current 'classic radio rock'. Meh. I guess Jimi Hendrix wasn't rock because he plugged into a wah pedal ... lulz Just felt like making a short list of awesome current rock bands, some well known, others not so much: Van Halen (Who's stoked about that new album?) Them Crooked Vultures (Where the hell is this new album?) Foo Fighters (GRHOLLLLL) The Sheepdogs (Groovy, bluesy rock, **** yes! AND they're Canadian.) Primus (Les Claypool, nuff said) Volbeat (Heavier but rocking) Clutch (Bluesy rock with an edge. Love me some Clutch) Chickenfoot (Supergroup being super) Alice in Chains (Some AiC fanboy might disagree with the rock title. IDGAFK) Five Horse Johnson (Similar to Clutch, think ZZ Top with an edge) They're all rocking harder than AC/DC and I didn't even mention Slash's solo material. Further proof that rock isn't dead.
    Zanary
    First of all, the entertainment rags declare rock dead about every 20 minutes, so just go by their average, and realize they've been dead wrong since David Bowie was still in body-spandex singing about the Spiders from Mars. That aside...I think the biggest issue is the "Led Pink Beatles" and others did fantastic jobs writing music that continues to brush off time with legendary consistency. Even more modern stuff like Guns n' Roses and some of the early 90's bands brought in music with undeniable emotion and message that had been "lost" for years. The difference is that nowadays, so many home-grown bands and tiny Indie labels abound that we don't get the next "big thing" in a bundle anymore; we have to look a little harder. Aging supergroups are fine, still playing great, but the answer to "what's next" is likely waiting on CDBaby, iTunes, Soundclick, or elsewhere...we just gotta find it and give it the attention it deserves. Last thing: I didn't want Steven Tyler on American Idol, still don't, but if he helps a few hundred thousand ignorant viewers find better music by association, it'll be like Guitar Hero helped some people discover real guitar.
    Scarecrow6459
    I think you ask, well what do people want to hear about right now? What is everyone talking about and what arn't they talking about? It's kind fo like Sabbath: It was the flower power times, but they didn't want to write about that "side" of life, so they wrote dark music. I think people in rock, people would always, in all of it's decades, talked about issues people wanted to hear about. About the same old grind. So again, what do the people want to hear?
    Oryan 210
    As long as the rock n' roll hall of fame is standing and has no "pop star" in it there will always hope
    Emenius Sleepus
    Rock's aesthetics were retained and evolved largely in metal, which was its natural progression. As a genre, rock on its own only has so much to offer; that's not to say that music is no longer relevant, just that its golden age as a loud and provocative genre is over.
    NightEmbers
    As primarily a metal musician i feel almost obligated to start a Led Pink Beatles project for the fact that a lot of genres mainstream today are not going to last the test of time. (ex does anyone listen to Backstreet or TLC anymore. Of course not and even more recently emo/screamo music died with 2011 THANK GOD) but does anyone listen to Aerosmith and Pink Floyd still? Damn right we do! So as a devoted progressive musician and even a classically trained vocalist i think that is honestly the best move for me and really any aspiring musicians at that. If i limit the amount death growls in my show imagine how many more people would show. And if i dont dress like a douche bag (ie A7X, BVB) people will be less ashamed to walk up to the stage. And if i can muster up enough balls in me to hit a note like myles kennedy than F@K my ass people will definitely dig it. So what i guess im ranting about about is if you shed the rockstar attitude, clothes, drugs and antics and focus on creating real music that'll actually last the test of time like Floyd has done, I dont see why more Bands wont sky rocket into success.
    MyNameAreHenry
    I think Rock and Roll is pretty dead, I've found it quite boring for awhile now. On the otherhand, I think underground metal bands are rising in popularity, with more and more people turning to bands like Periphery, Animals as Leaders, The Human Abstract, The Faceless - but to name a few! - for inspiration and to listen to something where they feel like they have a moral high ground. And I'm totally onboard with that, haha
    CronoMagus
    I think we have to come to terms with the fact that true Rock and Roll will never be popular again. There is a trend in what is popular and what isn't. It's usually what the newer genre of music is. When Rock and Roll came out in the mid 20th century, it was a brand new type of music, so people flocked to it. Same with grunge in the 90's, rap in the late 90s/2000s and pop from the 2000s/2010s.
    jawsheepdog
    RaysGotThis wrote: First off I gotta say kudos for a well written and funny column. It's nice to see a take that engages a bit with the ideas being talked about rather than just laying out statements for people to fight over. I think those people saying that rock got so popular because there was a pop aspect to it because it was novel are right, at least to an extent. Rock sprang up as a unique genre and went against the grain at first, but it didn't take long to become marketed to one group or another. The way it grew into its own in the 70s was awesome and there was great music as a result of that, but I don't think we're gonna see that again, at least not until this musical cycle turns away from "pop" pop and hip hop and to something different. That said, I think you're giving the Beatles a bit much credit. LET ME SAY that musically, I don't doubt their influence or contributions; they did a lot of crazy stuff that inspired a lot of people to go a lot of different ways, musically. But I feel that from a cultural angle, they get overstated. People seem to feel like they HAVE to be great, they're the ****ing Beatles, but that's not how it should work. They were on everybody's lips for a long time, but so are a lot of the big pop stars now. Hell, there were even droves of people going nuts about them, just like now. I don't think that's something I'd want to see repeat itself. We don't need that. That's how we end up with what we have: artists (term used loosely) put on a pedestal that they may not necessarily deserve. The thing is, we need something refreshing in the musical environment. When it came around, grunge was refreshing compared to hair metal, rock was refreshing compared to blues, metal was refreshing compared to disco. Something inspiring has to replace what's popular. Unfortunately anything that replaces something that was popular is likely to suffer the same fate. THAT is worrying. Rock had a great run for a few decades, but maybe it's better as a genre when it's not in the spotlight. Don't get me wrong, I love hair metal and I don't see anything wrong with some of the modern rock out there, but I don't think that it's going to live up to the artists of the rock heyday. I have my doubts that even the older acts that are still going can revitalize the genre. I'm a grass is greener on the other side kind of person, but maybe it's better off this way, at least for the time being.
    who else didnt take the time to read this novel